Being Vegetarian Compared to Raw Foodist

Is there a difference between vegetarian and raw food diets? A raw foodist is a vegetarian, but one who generally is not going to cook his vegetables or fruits. A vegetarian is someone who simply doesn’t eat meat, fish or poultry, but only consumes vegetables, pasta, and rice. A vegetarian might eat meatless spaghetti sauce or order onion rings in a restaurant. (Not the healthiest choice, but sometimes it’s hard to find something to eat in a restaurant if you’re vegetarian – even harder if you’re a raw foodist.)

RELATED: What Does It Mean To Eat Raw Foods?

There are different categories of vegetarians, like vegans, or fruitarians, and raw foodist is a category of vegetarianism. We haven’t seen anything about sushi being considered a raw food, but it is. Raw food, though, generally means eating raw, uncooked fruits, vegetables, dried fruits, seaweeds, etc.

But to be a raw food purist means raw broccoli, not steamed. To a vegetarian, someone committed to not eat meat or fish or animal products, steamed vegetables are just as good, although everyone would agree that steaming can take out nutrients from foods, rendering them less nutritious. A vegetarian might consume dairy or egg products; however a vegan will not consume any animal products at all. And a raw foodist is a vegan who consumes only uncooked, unprocessed raw foods.

Proponents of the raw diet believe that enzymes are the life force of a food and that every food contains its own perfect mix. These enzymes help us digest foods completely, without relying on our body to produce its own cocktail of digestive enzymes.

It is also thought that the cooking process destroys vitamins and minerals and that cooked foods not only take longer to digest, but they also allow partially digested fats, proteins and carbohydrates to clog up our gut and arteries.

Followers of a raw diet cite numerous health benefits, including:

  • increased energy levels
  • improved appearance of skin
  • improved digestion
  • weight loss
  • reduced risk of heart disease

FOR MORE INFORMATION DOWNLOAD THE EBOOK: Raw Foods Diet

Thank you to Healthy News Articles for posting this article. The above link is my way of saying thank you to you and our readers. Blessings, Dr. Bobby.

Researcher Jailed After Uncovering Deadly Virus Delivered Through Human Vaccine

Her research led to the discovery that deadly retroviruses have been transmitted to 25 million Americans through vaccines.

By Richard Enos

IN BRIEF

  • The Facts:Dr. Judy A. Mikovits, PhD, was thrown in prison after she refused to discredit her own research that led to the discovery that deadly retroviruses have been transmitted to 25 million Americans through vaccines.
  • Reflect On:What is the role of the Awakening Community in honoring and protecting courageous whistleblowers who risk their lives and careers to stand in their truth?

If you have been following stories in recent years of scientists and researchers who make discoveries that are threatening to the Deep State and the bottom line of Big Pharma, you will have seen the pattern before. Those doctors are often ‘persuaded’ to recant their studies, offered bribes or other benefits to distance themselves from or even destroy their data, and even threatened with jail time or, if a legal case is too difficult to fabricate against them, they may simply be killed.

Such is the tale of molecular biologist Judy A. Mikovits, PhD, in the disturbing true story first detailed in this Natural News article that included the video below of how she was thrown in prison for research that led to the discovery that deadly retroviruses have been transmitted to twenty-five million Americans through human vaccines.

Isolating The Virus

With a well-established history of working for the National Cancer Institute as a cancer researcher, Dr. Mikovits worked with human retroviruses like HIV. Her work focused on immunotherapy research. In 2009, she was working on autism and related neurological diseases. She found that many of the study subjects had cancer, motor-neuron disorders and chronic fatigue Syndrome (CFS). She believed a virus may have been responsible for these symptoms, and through her research, she isolated the viruses that turned out to come from mice.

It looked like a virus, it smelled like a virus, a retrovirus, because those are the types of viruses that disrupt the immune system. And several other investigators back in the 90s had actually isolated retroviruses from these people but the government called them ‘contaminants,’ that they weren’t real and that they didn’t have anything to do with the disease. Well, we isolated a new family of viruses that were called xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus. So these viruses were murine leukemia viruses, mouse viruses.

So spin forward two years, our paper published in one of the best scientific journals in the world in Science, October 8th, 2009. Usually that makes one’s career, in my case it ended my life as a scientist as I knew it.

Virus Delivered Through Vaccines

Dr. Mikovits’ paper, in and of itself, did not immediately bring the wrath of the powerful pharmaceutical industry. However, when a paper published 2 years later made the connection between this new virus and vaccines, then Mikovits’ research findings became too dangerous for the Deep State. Here is how Mikovits explains it in the video:

So in 2011, another AIDS researcher in a journal called Frontiers in Microbiology wrote a paper that really cost me a lot; I didn’t know that he was going to write this paper, but it basically said the most likely way that these murine leukemia virus-related viruses, these types of viruses, entered humans, was through vaccines.

So when did we start vaccines? 1953, 1934, right in the 30s with the polio, and what we were doing to attenuate, to make the virus less pathogenic, less toxic, is we were passing them through mouse brains, so we were passing them through the brains of mice, and every scientist who works with these viruses, and worked at the National Cancer Institute recognized the possibility that if you put human tissue and mouse tissue together the possibility is that you’re going to pick up a virus that is silent, in the mouse, that is it doesn’t hurt the mouse, but it kills the human, or causes serious disease in the human.

Deep State Comes Knocking

It was not long after the implications from the paper became clear and the Deep State saw the threat that was being posed to the vaccine industry that their powerful mechanisms of cover-up, obfuscation, and deception were activated:

I was fired, jailed, without cause, without hearing, without any civil rights at all, just drug out of my house in shackles one day, on November 18th, 2011, I refused to denounce the data, I refused to say it was a mistake, we have the data, I showed the data, I showed all of the data, and I just refused, they basically said tell everybody you made it all up, and you can go home. And if you don’t, we’ll destroy you. And they did.

She was arrested without a warrant and held in jail for 5 days without the opportunity for bail as a fugitive from justice, and was given a 4-year gag order. Her career was destroyed. Her story is documented in the book Plague: One Scientist’s intrepid Search For the Truth about Human Retroviruses and Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Autism, and Other Diseases.

Ironically, the FDA has now approved a testing protocol to detect retroviruses in the U.S. blood supply which is worth millions of dollars, and based in large part on Dr. Mikovits’ research, but it is being managed by Big Pharma. So while this distinguished scientist is now bankrupt and without employment, others are allegedly capitalizing on her research to earn millions of dollars to clean up the U.S. blood supply.

The Takeaway

Whistleblowers in all fields of human endeavor need to get the attention and the support of the Awakening Community. Brave people like Dr. Judy Mikovits show us that it is possible to keep your integrity even under tremendous pressure being brought down by the Deep State. We need to hear and proliferate their stories, since they provide us important insights into the way the world really operates, and help us to distinguish between those seeking the truth and those hiding it. Let’s all work together in continuing to remove the veils of deception in our world.

“Taste Like Heaven – Smells Like HELL”

Hail the King of Tropical Fruits

When we head to the fruit market, we are sure to be greeted by the sight of a familiar variety of fruits like apples, bananas, grapes, oranges, watermelon and many more locally grown produce. Thanks to the import and export industry, we are able to even enjoy the fruits of labor from neighboring countries and even countries from across the globe.

There is quite a luxurious selection of fruits ranging from an assortment of berries, citrus, tropical to the more exotic types. Of all the types of fruits out there, one fruit reign supreme over the others, well primarily in Southeast Asia. Known as the ‘King of Tropical Fruits’, the ‘Durio Zibethinus’ as it is scientifically named, is one fruit that is described to taste like heaven but smell like hell. Although it is acclaimed to have a rich heavenly taste, this fruit is very much an acquired taste. The late Anthony Bourdain, who tasted the fruit, said the experience is indescribable, and it would be something that you will either love or hate.

Introduction to Durian

The ‘Durio Zibethinus’ is also known generally by the public as durian. It is a highly prized fruit in a number of Southeast Asean countries and is best enjoyed when it is in season. Durian is a seasonal fruit, but its production periods are sometimes unstable, varying from year to year for the different varieties. The durian fruit is a native produce in Thailand, Malaysia, Brunei, and Indonesia but is also grown in some other Southeast Asean countries like The Philippines as well. High-quality durian fruit can be found in Malaysia and Thailand, and the latter is considered one of the largest exporters of the fruit.

Appearance

Unlike other fruits, durian possesses an appearance that is intimidating with a thick stem and spiky thorns. The durian is called the ‘King of Tropical Fruits’ for a reason, due to its spiky thorns which make it seem like it’s wearing a crown around its mighty stem. In fact, the name of the fruit is derived from the Malay word ‘duri’ for thorns. The spiky thorns actually serve an evolutionary purpose of reducing the probability of the fruit being attacked and eaten by birds, rodents or small creatures before it matures or ripens.

Smell

Its appearance is indeed scary for the uninitiated, but what is more menacing about the durian fruit is its pungent smell. The fruit emits an odor that is easily detectable yards away even before it appears within your field of vision. Quoting food writer Richard Sterling, the fruit smells like a combination of turpentine and onions, garnished with a gym sock. Well, this description seems like a complex blend of mismatched aroma that will do a great assault on one’s olfactory receptors. Because of its pungent smell, the durian is the only fruit that has a ban against it in certain places, like airline cabins, hotels, and public transportation. Scientists have tried to unravel the reason behind the stench produced by the fruit. In a new study in the Journal of Agriculture and Food Chemistry, a group of scientists from the German Research Center for Food Chemistry studied a sample of Thai durians and found out that there were over 50 discrete compounds in the durian fruit that is responsible for the uncommon aroma.

Preparation to Savor the Fruit

If you successfully conquered the hurdle of its appearance and smell, it would bring you a step closer to savoring this one-of-a-kind fruit. The next challenge would be to reach the golden nuggets of flesh without hurting yourself in the process. Opening the fruit requires technique and some preparation. The basic preparation would be a cloth glove – to protect your hands when you hold the fruit, a small cleaver – to pry open the fruit, and courage as well as strength to tackle the task.

Taste

Once you successful pry opens the fruit, it is time to put your taste bud to the test. Depending on the variety, you may come across golden colored or slightly yellowish chunks of flesh. The texture of the flesh may come across as custardy and foamy, ‘dry’ and firm or ‘wet’ and creamy. Durian lovers usually seek for a silky smooth and creamy finish, which makes the fruit an addictive treat. As for the taste, different varieties of the fruit possess different flavor profile. The sweeter variety is surely a hit, but some durian lovers actually prefer if the fruit carries a bitter-sweet tasting flesh. One account made by naturalist Alfred Russel Wallace in his Malay Archipelago in 1869, described durian as “A rich butter-like custard highly flavored with almonds gives the best general idea of it, but intermingled with it, come wafts of flavor that call to remind cream-cheese, onion-sauce, brown sherry, and other incongruities… To eat durians is a new sensation, worth a voyage to the east to experience.”

Demand and Supply

Despite its infamous characteristics, durian is gaining more worldwide acceptance. As a matter of fact, the Chinese fell head over heels with the taste of the fruit. Many Chinese tourists flock over to Thailand and Malaysia during the fruit’s peak season to savor it. Due to China’s appetite for the stinky fruit, many countries that produce durian took the opportunity to export their top quality batch over to accommodate the demand for the fruit. However, this doesn’t seem enough to satisfy the craving of the Chinese for this fruit that they are looking into buying in at the source by making investments into Malaysia’s durian orchards that produce the famous ‘Musang King’ variety. Apart from tapping into the sale of the fruit itself, some entrepreneurs also capitalize on the commercialization potential by using the flesh from the fruit in a variety of products marketed in various forms such as ice-cream, sweets, puff and pastry and many more.

Durian Tree

Source

Here are some extra ‘tit-bits’ on the ‘King of Tropical Fruits’ for you to savor.

  • Durian tree is a tropical fruit crop that grows in well-drained, deep sandy soil or clay soil with a high organic matter with slightly acidic nature between PH5.5 -5.6
  • The optimum conditions to facilitate the growth of durian plantation are – temperatures between 25-35 degree Celcius, relative humidity of 80% and an annual rainfall of 1,500 -2,000mm, which is well distributed throughout the year
  • The flesh of the fruit represents 20-35% of the fruit weight
  • Durian flesh is rich in carbohydrate, proteins, vitamins (Thiamine, Riboflavin, and Vitamins A and C), and minerals (Calcium, Phosphorus, Potassium, and Iron)
  • A durian tree can grow up to 40 meters tall. Trees that are planted from seed mature after seven to 12 years; clonal trees mature in four to five years
  • Durian flesh can be eaten fresh or processed into jams, marmalade, spread, pastilles, or flavoring in ice-cream, candies, cakes, and rolls

Durian On Sale

Thank you Brian (Charles Emerenwa) for posting this article on HubPages. Your contribution is appreciated. Blessings, Bobby.

DERMAL ABSORPTION OF ESSENTIAL OILS

Dermal Absorption of Essential Oils

DERMAL ABSORPTION OF ESSENTIAL OILS

For one reason or another, many of us have applied essential oils topically, either neat (undiluted) or as a blend in a carrier. The integumentary system is designed as a selectively permeable barrier to protect the human organism from its external environment.1,2 The inherent nature of the skin raises some curious questions with regards to essential oil applications, including: “How do essential oils pass through the skin?”… “How readily do they absorb?”… “Do essential oil constituents reach the bloodstream? If so, how much? Enough to elicit systemic therapeutic effects?”… and “Is there a way to increase penetration through and absorption into the various layers of the skin?” Scientific literature is offering great insight into these questions.

BASIC ANATOMY 101: THE INTEGUMENT

First, we must revisit basic anatomy and the layers of the skin. The outermost layer of the skin is the epidermis, which is comprised of 4 to 5 layers (depending on the location in the body). You may remember the mnemonic “Come, Let’s Get Sun Burned” or a similar tool to recall the layers from most superficial to deep: stratum Corneum, stratum Lucidum (palms and soles only), stratum Granulosum, stratum Spinosum, and stratum Basale. As cells mature, they progress from the stratum basale, out toward the stratum corneum.2 By the time they reach the stratum corneum, they have become anucleated and highly keratinized. The highly keratinized nature of the stratum corneum renders it a highly effective protective barrier, especially from transepidermal water loss.1

The innermost layer of the skin is called the dermis. It consists of connective tissue, nerve endings, blood vessels, lymphatic vessels, sweat glands, sebaceous glands, and hair follicles. For the purposes of transdermal absorption, the dermis provides minimal interference. The most significant barrier of transdermal absorption is the epidermis.3 By the time a transdermal agent has passed through the epidermis and reached the dermis, it has now gained easy access to blood vessels for systemic circulation.2

ROUTES OF TRANSDERMAL ABSORPTION

There are 3 mechanisms for transdermal delivery: the intracellular route, the intercellular route, and the shunt route. The intracellular route is where molecules pass directly into the corneocyte (cells of the stratum corneum), and continue inward, passing into and out of corneocytes along the way, whereas, in the intercellular route, molecules are penetrating into the layers of the skin through the tiny spaces in between cells. The shunt route is a clever bypass system in which molecules do not directly pass through the corneocytes or the spaces in between them; instead, they pass through structures that originate in the dermis and span the entire height of the epidermis. Such structures include sweat glands, sebaceous glands, and hair follicles. By disrupting the keratin-rich epidermal layers, these structures allow for a significantly greater relative dermal absorption of molecules. As such, areas on the body that are plentiful in sweat glands, sebaceous glands, and hair follicles (ie, scalp, face) are great locations for absorption.4,5

Depending on the chemical nature of the transdermal agent (ie, its molecular size, polarity), the path(s) that the agent uses and its degree of penetration are determined.

ESSENTIAL OILS: THE LIPID-LOVERS

As their name would imply, essential oil constituents are lipophilic (“fat-loving,” or fat-soluble). This suggests that essential oils mix well with oils, and poorly with water. As discussed previously, the keratinized nature of the epidermis is primarily designed to prevent desiccation; thus, the skin is a relatively lipophilic/hydrophobic barrier. Since both essential oils and the epidermis are relatively lipophilic, they “mix” relatively well together; consequently, essential oils have a greater tendency for transdermal absorption.

FACTORS INFLUENCING TRANSDERMAL ABSORPTION OF ESSENTIAL OILS

Many factors affect transdermal absorption rate and amount. Included among them are surface area of the application, location of the skin application, exposure time, use of an occlusion technique, and temperature.1,2,4-6

Certain factors, as a general rule, have specific effects on transdermal absorption (Table 1).

TABLE 1. FACTORS AFFECTING TRANSDERMAL ABSORPTION

FactorEffect on Absorption
↑ Surface Area of Application↑ Absorption
↑ Exposure Time↑ Absorption
↑ Occlusion↑ Absorption
↑ Temperature↑ Absorption

Regarding location of the skin application, areas with the thinnest epidermal layers, and areas rich in sebaceous glands, sweat glands, and hair follicles, prove to be the best areas of transdermal absorption. These locations include face, neck, scalp, and wrist.4,5

FROM SKIN TO BLOOD

Research suggests that essential oil constituents are found in traceable amounts in the bloodstream following topical applications. One study conducted with lavender essential oil tested for linalool and linalyl acetate (the 2 major constituents of lavender essential oil) in the blood following a gentle abdominal massage with a 2% lavender/98% peanut oil blend. Amounts of both constituents were identified 15 minutes after the beginning of the massage, with the peak occurring around 30 minutes. The study also calculated their half-lives: 13.76 minutes for linalool and 14.30 minutes for linalyl acetate. This demonstrates that these essential oil constituents do not remain in the bloodstream for long, and are readily metabolized by the body.7

CONCLUSION

Their lipophilic nature and small molecular size makes essential oil constituents great candidates for dermal absorption. In fact, these fragrant molecules are able to enter the bloodstream through such topical applications in quantifiable ways.7 Many factors influence transdermal absorption. By understanding the science of essential oils and the physiology of the body, we can target our therapies and maximize our aromatherapeutic effects.


This article was written by Timothy Miller ND, RA, is a naturopathic doctor and registered aromatherapist. His efforts lie in spearheading clinical aromatherapy instruction. Dr Miller believes in dynamic and engaging teaching techniques while focusing on interesting and clinically-relevant material. The webinar-based series “Clinical Aromatherapy for Medical Professionals” can be found online at http://www.ncnm.edu/ce. Coursework has been pre-approved for continuing education through the Oregon Board of Naturopathic Medicine.


REFERENCES:

  1. Menon GK, Cleary GW, Lane ME. The structure and function of the stratum corneum. International Journal of Pharmaceutics. 2012;435(1):3-9.
  2. Graham-Brown R, Burns T. Lecture Notes: Dermatology. 9th ed. Oxford, England: Wiley-Blackwell; 2007.
  3. Andrews SN, Jeong E, Prausnitz MR. Transdermal delivery of molecules is limited by full epidermis, not just stratum corneum. Pharm Res. 2013;30(4):1099-1109.
  4. Mohammed D, Matts P, Hadgraft J, Lane M. Variation of stratum corneum biophysical and molecular properties with anatomic site. AAPS Journal. 2012;14(4):806-812.
  5. Rougier A, Lotte C, Corcuff P, Maibach H. Relationship between skin permeability and corneocyte size according to anatomic site, age and sex in man. J Soc Cosmet Chem. 1988;39(1):15-26.
  6. Berthaud F, Narancic S, Boncheva M. In vitro skin penetration of fragrances: Trapping the evaporated material can enhance the dermal absorption of volatile chemicals. Toxicol in Vitro. 2011;25(7):1399-1405.
  7. Jager W, Buchbauer G, Jirovetz L, Fritzer M. Percutaneous absorption of lavender oil from a massage oil. J Soc Cosmet Chem. 1992;43(1):49-54.

Raw Chocolate Chia Berry Pie

This delicious chocolate, chia, berry pie is easy to make and packed with fiber, antioxidants and protein.

Serves: 12 to 14 depending upon size of slices

Equipment: Blender or Food Processor

Pudding Filling Ingredients:

  • 2 cups chia seeds
  • 6 cups hemp milk (or your favorite nut or seed milk)
  • 2 cups of frozen berries (1 cup of each Blackberries & Raspberries)
  • 4 T cacao powder
  • 1 1/2 cups date paste
  • 1 t Himalayan sea salt
  • 1 T vanilla – or to taste
  • 1 T lecithin

Pudding Directions: Blend all ingredients except chia seeds and pour mixture into a large bowl. Pour in chia seeds; whisk vigourously and set aside.

Crust Ingredients

  • 2 cups almond flour
  • 1 cup date paste
  • 3 T cacao powder
  • 1/4 cup melted (in dehydrator below 118 degrees) cacao butter
  • 1/2 t Himalayan sea salt

Crust Directions: Blend all ingredients in a high-speed blender. Scoop into spring-form pan and pat evenly at the bottom of the pan. Pour pudding mixture on top. Set in freezer for two hours. Let sit at room temperature for 1/2 hour before serving.  Optional — sprinkle top with cacao nibs.

Added Sugars: The Facts about Caloric Sweeteners

According to Tuff’s University, it’s not just a matter of switching sweeteners, it’s about cutting back on all added sugars.

Image © shakzu | Getty ImagesNo matter what form sugar takes, it looks the same to our bodies.

Americans consume 17 teaspoons of added sugars a day on average (more than one-third cup). That’s not to say we scoop that much into our coffee or tea. Sugar, in one form or another, is added to a huge variety of processed foods, from sweet drinks to cakes, cookies, candy, ice cream, and even breads, yogurt, and seemingly savory condiments and sauces such as ketchup and tomato sauce. Sugars and high added-sugar foods are not healthful choices, and switching sweeteners (say, from high fructose corn syrup to raw cane sugar) is not the answer.

What is Sugar?: When people say “sugar,” they are generally thinking of the white crystals one would find in a sugar bowl, a product typically refined from sugar cane or sugar beets. Technically, the word “sugar” has a different meaning: a sweet-tasting, soluble carbohydrate. There are three “simple” sugars (monosaccharides) in nature, glucose, fructose, and galactose. Every caloric sweetener in the natural world is formed from some combination of these three building blocks (most often glucose and fructose). Simple sugars are treated the same by our bodies whether we ingest them as sucrose (like table sugar) or as high fructose corn syrup. “There is no evidence of any difference in health impact between the major sugars in the U.S. food supply,” says Dariush Mozaffarian, MD, DrPH, dean of Tufts’ Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy and editor-in-chief of Tufts Health & Nutrition Letter. “Refined sugars like cane sugar, beet sugar, and high fructose corn syrup are all metabolically equivalent. Whether or not honey or maple syrup have different health effects needs more study.”

Fruits and vegetables have intrinsic sugars naturally contained within their cell walls, along with nourishing vitamins, minerals, and phytochemicals. They also have fiber that slows the release of sugars into the bloodstream and tends to limit how much one can consume at one sitting. “The health effects of sugar depend more on the dose and speed of ingestion and less on the source and type,” says Mozaffarian, “Our bodies evolved to metabolize small amounts of slowly digested sugars, such as those in a piece of fruit. When we consume added sugars, we are often getting a high dose of rapidly digested refined sugar.” This is the case even for so-called “natural” sugars. “There tends to be a misconception that if the sugar is isolated from a ‘natural’ source it does not count,” says Alice H. Lichtenstein, DSc, senior scientist at Tufts’ Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging and executive editor of Tufts Health & Nutrition Letter. “That simply is not the case. Added sugar is added sugar, even if it comes in the form of concentrated organic fruit juice. There is no getting around that fact.”


SUGAR BY ANY OTHER NAME …

Added sugars appear on ingredient lists by many names, but the body metabolizes them all in essentially the same way. On Nutrition Facts label ingredient lists, added sugars include the following:

  • any ingredient with the word “sugar,” such as white granulated sugar, coconut sugar, brown sugar, beet sugar, raw sugar, or sugar cane juice
  • any ingredient with the word “nectar,” such as agave nectar, peach nectar, or fruit nectar
  • any ingredient with the word “syrup,” such as corn syrup, high fructose corn syrup, carob syrup, maple syrup, brown rice syrup, or malt syrup
  • any ingredient containing a word ending in “-ose,” including sucrose, dextrose, glucose, fructose, maltose, lactose, galactose, saccharose, and mannose
  • cane juice/evaporated cane juice/cane juice crystals
  • caramel
  • corn sweetener/evaporated corn sweetener
  • fruit juice/fruit juice concentrate
  • honey
  • molasses
  • muscovado
  • panela (raspadora)
  • sweet sorghum
  • treacle

Health Impact of Added Sugars: Studies indicate that added sugars are associated with a number of adverse health concerns. “Natural sugars in fruits, vegetables, dairy, and grains are not associated with negative health outcomes,” says Lichtenstein, “but sugars that are removed from these natural sources, concentrated, and added to beverages and foods in processing are.” Sugary drinks and foods contribute directly to dental caries (cavities), and the caloric nature of many sweet treats may lead to weight gain. Being overweight or obese is, in itself, a risk factor for a number of chronic health conditions, including cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes and some cancers, but intake of added sugars may impact health even when weight is in the so-called “normal” range. “There is strong evidence that added sugar intake is a risk factor for type 2 diabetes,” says Lichtenstein. Strong evidence also indicates higher intake of added sugars is associated with increased cardiovascular disease risk in children and moderate evidence indicates an association with increased risk of high blood pressure, stroke, and coronary heart disease in adults. In a 2014 study in JAMA Internal Medicine, people who consumed more added sugars had a much higher risk of death from cardiovascular disease (CVD). Subjects who consumed ten percent to 25 percent of their calories from added sugars were 30 percent more likely to die from CVD than those for whom added sugars contributed less than ten percent of calories.

The Whole Package: High intake of added sugars is also associated with poorer diet quality. This means that people who eat a lot of foods with added sugars could be missing out on important, necessary, and health-promoting nutrients. Data indicate that it is not just the added sugars themselves (or the calories they add to our diets) that lead to health problems, it is also what we are not eating when we eat sweets and treats. A Finnish study published in the Journal of Nutrition Science in 2017 found that high added sugar intake (from foods like sugar-sweetened beverages, sugars and syrups, sweet bakery products, chocolate, and other sweets) was associated with low intake of fiber, lower fruit and vegetable consumption, and higher wheat consumption (likely from refined wheat products, rather than whole wheat). Those who consumed the most naturally occurring sugar had higher intake of fiber and fruits and vegetables (and they were also more likely to be physically active and less likely to smoke). “These findings reinforce the importance of evaluating a whole diet and not just individual components,” says Lichtenstein. “What we don’t eat can be as important as what we do eat.”

High intake of added sugars is associated a number of negative health impacts, including increased risk of diabetes, even without weight gain.

Recommendations: If we consume too much added sugar, it is difficult to meet our nutrient needs without exceeding our calorie needs. For this reason, the Dietary Guidelines for Americans (DGA) recommend limiting calories from added sugars to less than 10 percent of total daily calorie intake. For someone consuming a 2,000-calorie diet, this would mean less than about 12 teaspoons (50 grams) of added sugars a day. People who require less calories should aim for even lower added sugar intake. “Keep in mind this is a maximum, not something to aim for,” says Lichtenstein.

According to the USDA’s analysis of the most recent national survey data, only 44 percent of adults and 33 percent of children kept their added sugar intake below the DGA recommended maximum ten percent of calories in 2013-2014. On average, those who reported eating a diet in which added sugars exceeded this guideline consumed over 25 teaspoons a day.

Given the evidence associating higher intake of added sugars with heart disease, the American Heart Association (AHA) has issued recommendations that are more stringent than the DGA recommendations. The AHA suggests women and children get no more than 6 teaspoons (around 25 grams) of added sugars per day, and men no more than 9 teaspoons (around 38 grams) per day.

Sources of Added Sugars: Over 30 percent of added sugars in the American diet come from snacks and sweets (and ready-to-eat cereals are a significant contributor, especially in children) but nearly half of all added sugars in the American diet come from beverages. These include soft drinks (soda/pop), but also sweetened tea and coffee drinks, sports and energy drinks, and fruit drinks (which by definition contain added sugars). The DGA does not include sugars found naturally in 100 percent fruit juice in this category, although these beverages, too, are associated with weight gain. The World Health Organization includes the “free sugars” in 100 percent fruit juice in their recommendation to limit sugar intake.

According to a 2018 analysis published in the journal Nutrients, soft drinks were the main sugar-sweetened beverages (SSB) for adolescents, teens, and adults, but sweetened fruit drinks were the key contributor for children. Sports and energy drinks were increasingly prevalent in the nine and up age groups, but especially for nine- to 18-year-olds. Research has linked high intake of SSBs with poor dental health, weight gain, type 2 diabetes, heart disease, and metabolic syndrome (a cluster of symptoms associated with increased risk for cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes).

Sugar-sweetened beverages contribute the majority of added sugars to the American diet. Cutting back on carbonated beverages, sweet teas, sports drinks, juice drinks, and the like can make a significant health impact.

In response to rising concerns about the negative health effects of diets high in added sugars, the FDA has made “added sugars” a separate category on Nutrition Facts labels. This change should make it easier for consumers to monitor their intake of added sugars in particular.

The American Medical Association has called for further measures to protect the public’s health, including front-of-package warning labels for foods high in added sugars and an FDA limit to the amount of sugar that can be added to products that claim to have health or nutritional benefits. With or without these policy changes, we, as individuals, are the only ones who can choose to find a balance between the sweetness of our diets and the sweet possibility of a long, healthy life.

Chewy Superfood Hemp Protein Bars

These awesome superfood protein bars are great to keep on-hand for snacking or a quick on the go meal.

Written By:McKel Kooienga, MS, RDN, LDN Dietitian, Founder and CEO

McKel is a leading voice in nutrition and wellness, awarded “Top 20 Role Models” named by Arianna Huffington. As an RD, wellness advisor, and author of the Nutrition Stripped Cookbook — her mission is to teach others how to apply the science of nutrition and practice the art of healthy living by creating long-term health change out of daily practices. Featured in: Oprah.com, The Good Life by Dr. Oz, SELF, Vogue, Bon Appetit, Real Simple, Women’s Health, and other major media outlets.

THE RECIPE

SERVES 12+

Ingredients:

  • DRY //
  • 1 1/2 cup hemp protein powder, chocolate flavor (or original just add more cocoa)
  • 1/2 cup hemp hearts, shelled
  • 1/2 cup cocoa powder
  • 1/2 cup walnuts, ground into a coarse flour
  • 1/2 cup pumpkin seeds, whole
  • 1/4 cup chia seeds, ground
  • 1/4 cup dried mulberries
  • 2 tablespoons cacao nibs (optional)
  • 2 tablespoons spirulina powder
  • 1/4 teaspoon pink himalayan sea salt
  • dash of ground cinnamon
  • WET //
  • 1 1/2-2 cups dates, about 20 pitted
  • 1/2 cup dried tart cherries
  • 5 tablespoons coconut oil, melted
  • 1 heaping tablespoon almond butter
  • 1/2 cup water (start with 1/4 and add gradually)
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract

Directions:

  1. DRY //
  2. Coarsely grind walnuts and chia seeds. Pour into a large mixing bowl and combine all remaining dry ingredients (hemp powder, seeds, cocoa, pumpkin seeds, mulberries, cacao nibs, and seasonings). Set aside.
  3. WET//
  4. Combine all wet ingredients in a high speed blender or food processor. This mixture is very thick and sticky so you’ll need a powerful kitchen appliance or mix in small batches. Start with 1/4 cup of water in this mixture.
  5. Pour wet ingredients into the large mixing bowl with dry ingredients. This is where you can adjust the water and pay close attention to how much you use.
  6. Using your hands (the best tools for this!), massage and combine the mixture until everything has come together to form a large ball.
  7. If the mixture gets too wet, simply add more cocoa or hemp protein powder. If the mixture isn’t wet enough, try adding more coconut oil or a few more dates. The desired texture is a thick, chewy, sticky bar.
  8. In a 8×8 or 9×9 inch parchment lined pan, evenly spread the protein bar mixture into the pan. Using your hands and fingertips firmly press the mixture into an even layer until it’s even and smooth on top.
  9. Chill for at least 2 hours in the fridge.
  10. Cut into small pieces or 12 whole bars.
  11. Keep some for later in the freezer by wrapping individually in clear wrap or keep in the fridge for later use that week.
  12. Enjoy!

I love this recipe. We have a recipe that is very similar, accept it incorporates living foods. I will post it next week. Blessings, Bobby

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