The Nutritional Power In 1 Cup Of Raw Tomatoes

The following information was covered in a lecture I gave on the nutrient density of raw living food when compared to cooked foods. I shared this information with Creative Health Institute (CHI) students in October 2009. I hope it helps you to appreciate the amazing health benefits we receive, when we eat the way we were intended to eat. Dr. Ann Wigmore’s teachings have inspired me to research the science or raw living foods. I am planning on adding an additional section to the blog that focuses on raw living food nutrition.

Peace, Blessings, Love & Gratitude,

Bobby

Nutrients In One Cup Of Tomatoes

Protein: 1.58 g – The recommended daily protein requirements for humans are derived from “ideal body weight”. The ideal body weight is calculated based on height and varies slightly for men and women.

Our protein requirements can also be expressed in terms of total caloric intake, The World Health Organization (WHO), and many national health agencies have independently conducted studies, which (even though they differ slightly) all conclude our daily protein requirement should be between 10% to 15% of our daily caloric intake. Proteins are necessary for building the structural components of the human body, such as muscles and organs. You also need proteins to keep your immune system healthy, synthesize neurotransmitters, create and signal hormones, and much more. A balanced raw living food diet supplies the body with all of the protein it needs. Living food protein is found in nuts, seeds, sprouts, vegetables and sweet and non-sweet fruits.

Calcium: 18 mg – daily requirement is 1000 -1200 mg. Calcium is a mineral that gives strength to bones and teeth. It is important for muscle contraction, blood clotting, and nerve function. Calcium is the most abundant mineral in the body.Good sources – sunflower seeds, dark-green leafy vegetables

Iron: 0.49 mg – Daily requirement 8 mg a day for men 16 mg a day for women. Iron is a mineral found in every living cell. It is part of red blood cells and muscle proteins. Iron helps the blood cells and muscles to carry and hold oxygen and then release it when needed. Iron is essential to make enzymes and hormones. Good sources – dark-green vegetables,

Magnesium: 20 mg – Daily requirement – 420 mg/day for Males · 320 mg/day for Females. Magnesium is a mineral important for muscle contractions, a healthy nervous system, immune system and strong bones. It is involved in hundreds of enzyme reactions in the body. Good sources seeds, nuts, dark green vegetables, wheat grass. 

Phosphorus: 43 mg – Daily requirement 700 mg/day.  Phosphorous is a critical component of every cell. It works with the B vitamins to generate energy. Phosphorus is necessary for growth of bones and teeth; bones and teeth are 85% phosphorous. It works with sodium and potassium to maintain acid-base balance, and assist in muscle contraction, kidney function, heartbeat regulation, and in nerve conduction. Second to calcium in the body. Bones and teeth are 85% Phosphorus. Good sources all fruits, vegetables, nuts and seeds, and sprouts.

Potassium:427 mg No minimum RDA An adequate daily amount of potassium for adults is 4,700 mg/ day. Potassium maintains heartbeat and is important in many metabolic reactions. It balances fluid inside and outside the cells to maintain normal cell function. Potassium blunts the rise of blood pressure in response to excess dietary sodium. A high potassium diet might help prevent bone loss and kidney stones. Good sources – The highest sources are apricots, figs, prunes, bananas, oranges and orange juice, cantaloupe, honeydew, sweet potatoes and tomatoes

Sodium: 9 mg –  250 -500 mg a day is sufficient. Our  kidneys conserve and release sodium as needed. For “salt-sensitive” people, blood pressure will increases in direct proportion to increases in sodium intake. About 60% of adults with high blood pressure are salt sensitive. Blood pressure above120 systolic/80 diastolic is high. In countries where sodium intake is low, there is less hypertension, cardiovascular disease and stroke. Excess sodium may also weaken the bones by promoting calcium excretion.

Zinc: 0.31 mg The RDA for Zinc for healthy adults is:11 mg/day for healthy males 8 mg/day for healthy females. Zinc is a mineral that is needed for growth, especially during pregnancy and childhood, and for tissue building and repair. It is involved in wound healing, maintaining a healthy immune system, and cell reproduction. Zinc is a component of over 100 enzymes in the body. Good sources – sunflower seeds pumpkin seeds, Almonds pine nuts, pecans, walnuts, cashews, nuts, blackberries and kiwi.

Vitamin C: 22.9 mg  – The Recommended Dietary Allowance is 90 milligrams a day for males and 75 milligrams a day for females. Vitamin C is a powerful antioxidant  protecting cells against oxidizing damage, helps wounds to heal, fights infections, promotes healthy bones, teeth, gums and blood vessels, and aids in the absorption of iron. Good sources -Fruits and vegetables are high in Vitamin C. The highest are red and green peppers, oranges, cantaloupe, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cabbage, and tomatoes. 

Thiamin B Vitamin:0.067 mg – RDA 1.2 mg/day for males and 1.1 mg/day for females. Thiamin is a water soluble B vitamin, also known as vitamin B1. It helps produce energy from carbohydrate on a cellular level, and is very important for nerve conduction and muscle function. Alcoholics are very low on Thiamin – Not enough causes BERIBERI , both  wet and dry. Good sources – Brazil nuts, pecans, spinach, tomatoes, cantaloupe and oranges.

Riboflavin B2 Vitamin: 0.034 mg –  adults are 1.3 mg/day for males and 1.1 mg/day for females. Riboflavin is a water-solublevitamin, which helps us get energy from carbohydrates. It is important for growth and red blood cell production. It also helps to convert the amino acid, tryptophan, to the B vitamin, niacin. Good sources- Almonds,  broccoli, asparagus, and spinach.

Niacin B Vitamin: 1.069 mg The RDA for niacin (as NE) in healthy adults is 16 mg/day for males and 14 mg/day for females. Niacin is a water-soluble B vitamin, essential for energy metabolism in the cells, the proper functioning of the gastrointestinal and nervous systems, healthy skin, and the release of energy from carbohydrates, fats and protein. Affects the proper functioning of over 50 much-needed enzymes in the body. Niacin also has the ability to lower the LDL cholesterol (coined as bad cholesterol) level and prevent build-up of plaque on arterial walls. Good sources –  Niacin rich foods include almonds and seeds, wheat grass, green leafy vegetables, carrots, turnips and celery.

Pantothenic Acid – B Complex Vitamin:0.160 mg – 5mg a day is good. Pantothenic Acid is a water-soluble vitamin that is one of the B complex vitamins. It is involved in the release of energy from carbohydrates and helps to metabolize protein, fat and carbohydrates from food. Pantothenic acid plays a part in 100 different chemical reactions needed to produce lipids, steroids, hemoglobin, and other substances in the body. Good Sources – mushrooms, avocadoes, broccoli, and sweet potatoes.

Vitamin B6:0.144 mg – 1.3 – 1.7 mg per day. Vitamin B6, is a water-soluble vitamin needed by the nervous and immune systems. Vitamin B6 helps nerve cells to communicate. It is involved in making hormones, insulin, antibodies, and cell membranes, and is needed for the normal breakdown of protein, carbohydrates and fat. Vitamin B6 helps to maintain blood sugar within the normal range. Vitamin B6 also aids in the formation of niacin from the amino acid, tryptophan. Good sources – bananas, spinach, leafy greens, wheat grass, sprouts.

Folate:27 mcg –  The RDA for folic acid is 400 micrograms /day. Folate is one of several B vitamins found in foods. It is vital for making new, healthy body cells. Low Folate causes –  General weakness, fatigue, depression, gastrointestinal problems, and frequent infections. Good sources – strawberries and citrus fruits and juices; leafy green vegetables such as spinach and romaine lettuce, wheatgrass Folic acid, a man-made form of folate.

Vitamin A:1500 IU – International Units (IU) on food and supplement labels. Adult men require 3000 IU/day and women need 2310 IU/day. There is no RDA for provitamin A. Vitamin A is needed for: Vision, immunity, growth and reproduction. It keeps the mucous linings of he respiratory, urinary, and intestinal tracts healthy to prevent bacteria and viruses from entering.  Vitamin A is usually abundant in colorful fruits and vegetables is in a form that can be converted to Vitamin A (provitamin A). Carotenoids, like beta-carotene, are examples of provitamin A.  Good sources – Pro vitamin A is found in dark green and bright orange vegetables and fruits like spinach, sweet potatoes carrots, cantaloupe, apricots, tomatoes and others. Deeper colors are associated with higher levels of  Pro Vitamin A.

Vitamin E:0.97 mg – The RDA for vitamin E for adults is 15mg/day. Vitamin E is an antioxidant that protects cells membranes from damage. It is particularly important for cells that carry oxygen like the cells of lungs and red blood cells. Vitamin E also has a role in immune function, DNA repair, and other metabolic processes. Good Sources – seeds, nuts,  wheat grass, sprouts, dark green leafy vegetables (like spinach, etc.), and tomato.

Vitamin K:14.2 mcg  – Vitamin K aids blood clotting, protects the heart, and helps to build bones. Allow your blood to clot normally; Helps protect against osteoporosis; Prevent oxidative cell damage.
Good sources – the major source of Vitamin K is green, leafy, vegetables – kale, collards, spinach, and turnip greens are the highest.

Phytonutrients

Beta Carotene:808 mcg. Beta Carotene, as an anti-oxidant, supports the cardiovascular system. And, after the body transforms Beta Carotene to Vitamin A, it helps maintain the health of the skin, immune system, and eyes. Vitamin A is an essential component of the epithelial cells which guard us from environmental toxins. Beta carotene both lowers cholesterol and helps minimize arterial hardening. It may also benefit sufferers of cataracts, cancer, AIDS, high blood pressure, heart disease, Alzheimer’s disease, rheumatoid arthritis, headaches, and asthma. Beta carotene may also, because of its ability to act as a powerful antioxidant within the human body help prevent cancer and heart disease. In addition, because anti-oxidants neutralize the cell-structure damaging chemical reactions of free radical, beta carotene may slow free radical related aging and disease. A Harvard University study indicated that those who take 50mg of beta carotene daily have their risk of heart attacks and strokes cut in half! Beta carotene will also improve vision and skin conditions like psoriasis and eczema, and beta carotene acts to prevent the development of precancerous cells mouth and respiratory tract.

Lycopene: 4631 mcg. Lycopene is a natural pigment that gives the tomato its red colour.  It is also one of our most powerful antioxidants. Antioxidants have a protective effect on our cells and are often described as being ‘anti-aging’. Lycopene in particular has been noted for its ability to protect DNA and prevent disease, and it continues to be the subject of studies on heart disease and cancer. Lycopene is  released when the food is cooked or when the cell walls are broken down by a high speed blender. Good Sources – Tomatoes and other bright colored vegetables.

Lutein: 221 mcg. Lutein is concentrated in the retinas of your eyes and is necessary for good vision. A diet rich in lutein may lower your risk of developing cataract and macular degeneration. Lutein may also help prevent or slow down atherosclerosis, the thickening of arteries, which is a major risk for cardiovascular disease. Good Sources – Carrots, squash and other orange and yellow fruits and vegetables are sources of lutein. Green leafy vegetables, such as spinach, also contain high amounts of lutein.

I hope this information will help you to better understand how important it is that we have a good variety of fresh fruits, leafy greens, sprouts, nuts and seeds in our diet.

Blessings,

Robert Morgan – Bobby

Health & Education Director

Creative Health Institute

Union City,  Michigan 49094

866.426.1213

Experience The Healthful Feelings That Go With A Balanced pH

“Your energy will increase, you’ll find new mental clarity and powers of concentration, you’ll build strength and stamina, and you’ll lose excess body fat while increasing muscle mass. You’ll have bright eyes and clear skin. You’ll look better. You’ll improve your athletic performance. Your entire body will function more efficiently. Whatever health challenges you’ve been facing will improve and most likely evaporate altogether. In short, you’ll regain all the effortless energy and wellness you thought was lost with your childhood.”  Dr Robert O. Young, MS, D.Sc., Ph.D.   Author of “The pH Miracle”

Before we really get into the understanding of how to balance your pH we really need to under stand what is going on in our bodies. After food is digested in the body, it leaves behind a mineral residue (ash), which is excreted in the bodies systems.. Thus, specific foods have specific effects on the pH balance. All foods are either acid-ash, alkaline-ash or neutral-ash, meaning that they either decrease, increase or do not change the pH.  Your  pH can be changed by making different food choices. Scientifically it is explained as: pH, (from potential of Hydrogen) the logarithm of the reciprocal of hydrogen-ion concentration in gram atoms per liter; provides a measure on a scale from 0 to 14 of the acidity or alkalinity of a solution (where 7 is neutral and greater than 7 is more basic and less than 7 is more acidic);)

More important than the scientific definition is that we need to understand that different fluids, organs and systems in the human body have a delicate range of acid-alkaline balance that must be maintain for optimal functioning.

The only fluid that must remain constant, is our blood. Our blood pH should be slightly alkaline (7.35-7.45) and never go below or above this range. If our blood pH moves below 6.8 or above 7.8, cells stop functioning and the body dies. Therefore our bodies continually strives to balance our pH. When we measure pH a healthy range is between 6.4 and 7.5 for our bodies systems. This does not reflect our bloods pH

When our pH balance is compromised and drops below 6.4 then we must immediately do what we can to bring it back into balance. One of the easiest ways to re-balance our pH is to  drink water and ingest foods that reblance the pH. 

Generally, nutritionists hold that the ratio of alkaline to acid foods in the diet should be about 4 to 1—in other words, 80 percent of a person’s food intake should be alkaline and 20 percent acidic. The American diet tends to be more acidic than this ratio dictates; even the balanced diet prescribed by the food pyramid will leave more acid ash than is recommended by nutritionists concerned with pH.

At Creative Health Institute we see many guests who encounter health challenges  as well as life threatening diseases which may have been caused by over consuming foods which are acidic or acid-producing after they have been digested. It is our belief that millions of people suffer from problems caused by food induced acidosis. When we combine this problem with our fast paced modern lifestyle and our poorly combined Standard American Diet (SAD), we promote dangerous levels of acidification within our bodies.

An imbalanced diet high in acidic-producing foods such as animal protein, sugar, caffeine, and processed foods puts pressure on the body’s systems and cause them to struggle to maintain pH neutrality. A good example  would be soft drinks; To neutralize a glass of cola with a pH of 2.5, it would take 32 glasses of alkaline water with a pH of 10. The extra buffering that is needed to keep the body’s systems in a balanced state can deplete our bodies of alkaline minerals such as sodium, potassium, magnesium, and calcium, making us prone to serious health challenges and degenerative disease.

Every morning we test our pH levels before doing anything else. By using pH test strips our guests and students are able to determine their resting pH, which would be at the lowest point of the day.  pH should rise through out the day as we take in properly combined food that are designed to keep our bodies balanced and to protect the functioning of our immune system.

When our body’s systems are forced to keep doing extra duty in keeping our blood  and systems at the proper pH levels, minerals are borrowed from vital organs and bones to balance the pH,  neutralize acid and safely remove it from our body. Because of this strain, our bodies many times suffer severe and extenuating damage; This damage may take years to detect.

Our diet plays a major part in our ability to maintain proper pH levels, but acidosis can occur from other acid-forming stresses such as, emotional stress, toxic overload, and/or immune reactions and any process which deprives our body’s cells of oxygen and other nutrients. 

Scientific research continues to shed more light on how important it is to avoid acidosis and have the body’s pH level slightly alkaline, so that the body  not has the ability to repair the immune system and heal itself. When we find ourselves in acidosis we may experience:

Cardiovascular damage.
Weight gain, obesity and diabetes.
Bladder conditions.
Kidney stones.
Immune deficiency.
Acceleration of free radical damage.
Hormonal problems.
Premature aging.
Osteoporosis and joint pain.
Aching muscles and lactic acid buildup.
Low energy and chronic fatigue.
Slow digestion and elimination.
Yeast/fungal overgrowth.
Lack of energy and fatigue.
Lower body temperature.
Tendency to get infections.
Loss of drive, joy, and enthusiasm.
Depressive tendencies.
Easily stressed.
Pale complexion.
Headaches.
Inflammation of the corneas and eyelids.
Loose and painful teeth.
Inflamed, sensitive gums.
Mouth and stomach ulcers.
Cracks at the corners of the lips.
Excess stomach acid.
Gastritis.
Nails are thin and split easily.
Hair looks dull, has split ends, and falls out.
Dry skin.
Skin easily irritated.
Leg cramps and spasms.

This list could be expanded, but it gives you a good idea of just how important it is to not let your body experience bouts of acidosis.

The following chart is designed to give you and overview of the levels of acidity and alkalinity some foods have.  For a more extensive chart, drop me an email and I will forward one that contains more then 500 different foods.

FOOD CATEGORY  High Alkaline Alkaline Low Alkaline Low Acid Acid High Acid
BEANS, VEGETABLES, LEGUMES  Vegetable Juices, Parsley, Raw Spinach, Broccoli, Celery, Garlic, Barley Grass Carrots, Green Beans, Lima Beans, Beets, Lettuce, Zucchini, Carob Squash, Asparagus, Rhubarb, Fresh Corn, Mushrooms, Onions, Cabbage, Peas, Cauliflower, Turnip, Beetroot, Potato, Olives, Soybeans, Tofu Sweet Potato, Cooked Spinach, Kidney Beans Pinto Beans, Navy Beans Pickled Vegetables
FRUIT  Dried Figs, Raisins Dates, Blackcurrant, Grapes, Papaya, Kiwi, Berries, Apples, Pears Coconut,  Cherries, Tomatos, Oranges, Cherries, Pineapple, Peaches, Avocados, Grapefruit, Mangoes, Strawberries, Papayas, Lemons, Watermelon, Limes Blueberries, Cranberries, Bananas, Plums, Processed Fruit Juices Canned Fruit  
GRAINS, CEREALS          Amaranth, Lentils, Sweetcorn, Wild Rice, Quinoa, Millet, Buckwheat Rye Bread, Whole Grain Bread, Oats, Brown Rice White Rice, White Bread, Pastries, Biscuits, Pasta  
MEAT              Liver, Oysters, Organ Meat Fish, Turkey, Chicken, Lamb Beef, Pork, Veal, Shellfish, Canned Tuna & Sardines
EGGS & DAIRY      Breast Milk Soy Cheese, Soy Milk, Goat Milk, Goat Cheese, Buttermilk, Whey Whole Milk, Butter, Yogurt, Cottage Cheese, Cream, Ice Cream Eggs, Camembert, Hard Cheese Parmasan, Processed Cheese
NUTS & SEEDS      Hazelnuts, Almonds Chestnuts, Brazils, Coconut Pumpkin, Sesame, Sunflower Seeds Pecans, Cashews, Pistachios Peanuts, Walnuts
OILS     Flax Seed Oil, Olive Oil, Canola Oil Corn Oil, Sunflower Oil, Margarine, Lard        
BEVERAGES Herb Teas, Lemon Water Green Tea Ginger Tea  Raw Cocoa Wine, Soda/Pop Tea (black), Coffee, Beer, Liquor
SWEETENERS, CONDIMENTS Stevia Maple Syrup, Rice Syrup  Raw Honey, Raw Agave White Sugar, Processed Honey Milk Chocolate, Brown Sugar, Molasses, Jam, Ketchup, Mayonnaise, Mustard, Vinegar Artificial Sweeteners

 Blessings, Bobby

A Simple Yeast Overgrowth Test You Can Do At Home

 
Yeast Over Growth Test

“Some health care professionals believe that Up to 89% of Americans May Have Candida” – If you would like to have a good indication if you have an over abundance of yeast… 

Try this Fast Candida Saliva Test Our Students & Guest Do It Every Day!` 

When you awake in the morning, before you brush your teeth, drink anything or eat any food, bring your tongue to the roof of your mouth and make a chewing motion until you have enough saliva in your mouth, then spit the saliva into a clear 8 oz  glass of water. Within 5-15 minutes, look in the glass. If there are strings coming down from your saliva, or if the water turned cloudy, or if your saliva sank to the bottom, You May have a Candida concern.  Healthy saliva will simply float on the top! 

Why does this work? 

Candida overgrowth begins in the colon. Overtime, as the fungal yeast multiplies it begins to migrate through the digestive tract, moving up into the small intestine, then the stomach (bloating, indigestion), up the esophagus and into the mouth. If it becomes strongly entrenched there and many times you can see a white film on your tongue and inside your cheeks. Once it has moved up to the mouth and you spit into a glass of water the yeast will sink because it is heavier than water. If there is no yeast, it will float on top. 

Remember this test is not 100% accurate and may miss yeast that has not traveled into the up the digestive track and entrenched itself on the tongue or in the mouth.  At Creative Health Institute we use the test as an indicator making sure our students understand that it is both a science and an art, when it comes to reading the results of the saliva test.

Physicians have other testing modalites which help with identifying Candida Overgrowth (CO).  One of the most reliable is the Candida Immune Complexes test, followed by a combinatoin of IgA, IgG and IgM test.  These tests range from $100 to $250, excluding the cost of your office visit.

Checklist for Candida Albicans  

This test is reviewing the signs and symptoms to determine if you have Candida Albicans yeast infection Overgrowth. 

Candida Albicans yeast infection Overgrowth, Candida Overgrowth (CO) symptoms are so numerous and seemingly unrelated that they can be confusing to both doctor and patient. The majority of people who have CO do not realize they have it until they become seriously ill. Why? Because candida yeast not only steals nutrients from the food that you eat, it then poisons the tissues with waste material containing over 75 known toxins. Candida albicans is linked, directly or indirectly, to the following list of conditions and symptoms. A “symptom” is an outward sign that points to a deeper problem. 

Review the 80 likely symptoms listed below to see if any apply to you. Give yourself ONE POINT for each of those which you have had persistently (for a month or longer, either currently or at anytime in the past).

Digestive Troubles

  • Bad Breath,
  • Gas/Bloating,
  • Indigestion,
  • Diarrhea,
  • Constipation,
  • Intestinal Pain,
  • Low Blood Sugar,
  • Food / sugar cravings,
  • Mouth or stomach ulcers,
  • Allergies (Air or Food),
  • Food Sensitivities,
  • Heartburn,
  • Dry Mouth,
  • Receding Gums,
  • Hemorrhoids, rectal itch
  • Irritable bowel.

Behavioral 

  • Anti-social Behavior,
  • Suicidal Tendencies,
  • Insomnia,
  • Depression,
  • Anxiety, high strung.
  • Irritability.

Skin & Joint Problems 

  • Thrush, Diaper Rash,
  • Acne, Skin Rash or Hives,
  • Dry Skin & Itching,
  • Finger, toe or foot Fungus,
  • Athlete’s Foot,
  • Liver Spots,
  • Water Retention,
  • Joint Pain,
  • Muscle Aches,
  • Numbness.

Troubles 

  • Hyperactivity
  • Attention Deficit Disorder,
  • Lack of Impulse Control,
Female Problems

  • Infertility,
  • Vaginal Yeast Infection,
  • Menstrual Problems,
  • PMS Symptoms,
  • Bladder Infections,
  • Endometriosis,
  • No Sex Drive,
  • Hormonal Imbalance,
  • Iron Deficiency.

Mental & Emotional 

  • Dizziness,
  • Mental Fogginess, (Confused, spaced-out, blank stares, day dreaming)
  • Inability to Concentrate (Having to re-read the same thing twice)
  • Poor memory (Where are my car keys? or, Why did I come into this room?)
  • Mood Swings,
  • Headaches.

Immune Problems 

  • Lethargic/Laziness,
  • Chronic Fatigue,
  • Asthma, Hay Fever,
  • Colds & Flu,
  • Puffy Eyes,
  • Respiratory Problems,
  • Chemical Sensitivity,
  • Epstein Barr Virus,
  • Adrenal/Thyroid Failure,
  • Cold/Shaky,
  • Ear Infections,
  • Chronic sore throat,
  • Post nasal drip,
  • Hair Loss,
  • Stuffed sinus (sinusitis),
  • Overweight,
  • Underweight,
  • Diabetes,
  • Burning Eyes,
  • Premature Aging,
  • Autism

YOUR ADDED SCORE IS _____ (one point per symptom) 

0-4 points – Indicates variations of normal living (unless persistent and severe).
5-9 Points– Indicates a Clear Pattern shows likely development of CO dysbiosis.
10 or more – Indicates Strong Pattern and almost certain CO dysbiosis. 

The term dysbiosis was originally introduced in the early 1900s by Dr Eli Metchnikoff to describe an imbalance of the bacteria in the gut. Literally it means ‘dys’ incorrect and ‘biosis’ life. The word comes from ‘symbiosis’ meaning to reside together harmoniously with the ‘dys’ meaning the opposite. He coined the expression that “Death begins in the gut!”. Metchnikoff was awarded the Nobel Prize in 1908 for his work on friendly bacterial flora [1]. He introduced the idea that fermented milk products could prove beneficial to the gut, inhibiting bacterial infection. He believed that the root of many diseases was via intestinal bacteria decomposing protein in the bowel. Lactic acid producing bacteria were believed to stunt the production of the pathogenic bacteria. 

Evidence has suggested that Dysbiosis plays a part in many conditions such as: Over production of yeast, Irritable Bowel Syndrome, Anklyosing Spondylitus, Rheumatoid Arthritis, Inflammatory Bowel Disease, Multiple Sclerosis, Chronic Fatigue, Eczema, food allergies. Many people are unaware that they are even suffering from Dysbiosis.  

Please call us if you need more information about our programs and how we deal with helping you to eliminate yeast overgrowth.

Blessings,

Robert Morgan – Bobby

Creative Health Institute

Union City, Michigan 49094

866.426.1213

How To Peserve Food & Enzymes From Your Summer Garden…

Its nearing the end of summer in the northern hemisphere and it time to store our fruits, vegetables and berries which we have collected from our summer gardens. What we are going to share with you will not necessarily prove popular with some in the raw food community, but we believe in good science an therefore we have to speak out, as the health of 0ur family and friends is much more important to us than raw food dogma.

We therefore  suggest freezing as much locally grown organic raw vegetables, fruits and berries as possible, unless you have access t this level of fresh living  nutrition year around.

The freezing process will cause the enzymes to become inactive thereby preserving the nutritional values. Testing shows there will be a reduction in the enzymatic action of some of the enzymes but the freezing will not denature all the enzymes, like cooking does.  Scientist estimate only 10%-30%. of the enzymes are denatured in the freezing process.produce hauling  truck We feel you will be much better off eating fresh, frozen, organically grown produce, rather than having to purchase food that has not been left to ripen on the vine . The grocery stores are also selling food which has traveled across the country, or has been flown in from halfway around the world, so the food source is sometimes unknown and with the loss of water volume much of the vitamins and phyto-nutrients have been reduced.

Once fruits, vegetables or berries are cut from the vine ,their nutrient source, they begin to immediately looses nutrients. A piece of produce two weeks enzyme deathold may have lost 50% of its nutritional value.

Our bodies need real food that is nutritionally dense, whether raw and untouched or frozen. The choice is your and we honor your choices.prehistoric man

Cooking food was the way early man preserved it. There was no refrigeration or dehydration. To keep there food from rotting they had to stop the enzymatic processes and that’s why when we cook our food the enzymes begin to decrease. This decrease starts between 104 and 106 degrees and by the time the temperature reaches 120 degrees all the enzymes are destroyed.

Cooking food also diminishes the oxygen levels, destroying the foods ability to bring life giving oxygen to our cells.  An easy way to remember the best temperature to cook you foods is “105 stay alive”.

If you are in the area we would love you to stop by and visit the garden here at Creative Health Institute. Dr. Ann Wigmore loved the gardens here at the institute and we have many unpublished pictures of her in the garden and on the grounds picking more than 30 varieties of wild edibles.

Remember raw food is amazing and nutritious, but raw living food is what you need to be eating to experience the highest level of health.Wishing you  healthiest life ever.

Bobby