Be The Reason Someone Believes In The Goodness Of People. Now Show Someone You Love Them. Brownies Anyone?

Nothing like raw vegan brownies to put smiles on our faces and bring us together.

The Most Delicious Raw Vegan Brownies You Have Ever Eaten!

Paige Brummett, the creator of this fantastic brownie recipe, interned at CHI while I was Director and showed us her extraordinary talent for developing allergen- and agave-free desserts. We love you, Paige!!! :-).

Equipment you will need:
Food Processor
High-Speed Blender or Coffee Grinder
Optional: Dehydrator

Ingredients:
2 cups Coconut water
20 Dates
1 Tbsp Vanilla powder
3/4 cup Cacao Powder
3/4 cup Carob Powder
1/2 cup melted Coconut Oil (melt in a dehydrator or put the jar in hot water)
1/2 cup melted Cacao Butter (same as above)
2 cups Ground Golden Flax (Grind whole flax seed in a high-speed blender or coffee grinder)

Directions:

  1. Blend all ingredients (except for golden flax) in a food processor until creamy.
  2. Combine all ingredients together in a big bowl and mix until a dough-like consistency.
  3. Spread batter into a baking dish and dehydrate or refrigerate for 2 hours.
  4. ENJOY every bite of pure love!

God bless and empower each of you with health, love, and peace. Bobby

Our World Famous Raw Living Foods No Bake Chocolate Cake & Cashew Cream Frosting

This wonderful raw liviing foods chocolate cake is easy to make and actually tastes as good if not better than a baked flour cake.

EQUIPMENT NEEDED: Food Processor or Blender
PREPARATION TIME: 15 minutes

Raw Living Food Chocolate Cake With Chocolate Cashew Frosting

ORGANIC INGREDIENTS (If possible)
– 1 ½ cups raw organic walnuts
– 12 pitted oganic Medjool dates – 1 small organic banana
– 1/4 cup alfalfa sprouts Ooptional living food)
– 1/2 cup unsweetened raw cocoa or raw carob powder – 1 tablespoon organic coconut oil
– 1 tsp pure organic vanilla extract or 2 tsps raw organic vanilla powder – Dash of pure sea salt or Himalayan salt (salt to taste)
– ½ cup fresh raspberries or strawberries (optional)

DIRECTIONS:

  1. Fit the food processor with S-blade.
  2. Put walnuts and salt in the food processor and process until finely ground.
  3. Add all the other ingredents.
  4. Process until ingredients are combined and stick together. Add water or Rejuvelac as needed.
  5. Transfer to a plate and form a 5-inch round cake with your hands or with a mold.
  6. Garnish the cake with fresh raspberries or sliced fresh strawberries before serving. Better yet make up a quick cashew cream frosting then garnish the cake.

WORLD FAMOUS CASHEW CREAM – Serves 4

EQUIPMENT NEEDED: Blender

ORGANIC INGREDIENTS:
– 2 cups cashews
– 2 Tablespoon Tahini (optional)
– 12 -15 dates (not soaked)
– 1/8 cup sprouts (alfalfa, mung or red clover)
– 3 teaspoons nonalcoholic, pure organic vanilla extract – 1 teaspoon organic coconut oil – 2 tsps organic maple syrup (optional)
– Water or Rejuvelac – add the liquid slowly as needed to keep the blender going.

DIRECTIONS:

  1. Blend everything until very, very smooth – almost fluffy.
  2. Add some raw cacao, and you will swoon.

VARIATIONS:

Add Raw Cacao for Chocolate Frosting

Add Strawberries for Frosting

Add Lemon for Lemon frosting, etc.

Creative Health Institutes Teaching On COPD Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

Many people come to Creative Health Institute to learn how to get relief from COPD. We have a complete training program for those who need help or would like to help those who suffer from this terrible disease.
Our Health and Education Director Robert “Bobby Morgan” teaches classes which cover all the specific types of foods and herbs which are used in helping COPD sufferers obtain relief. If you know of anyone who is suffering from this disease or you would like to lean learn more about COPD, call Creative Health Institutes toll free number, 866.426.1213 and we will send a information packed brochure, which cover CHI’s COPD programs.

Causes of COPD
The primary causes of COPD is long term cigarette smoking, the more years you smoke and the more packs you smoke, the greater your risk. Symptoms of COPD usually appear about 10 years after you start smoking, but other irritants can cause COPD including second hand smoke, occupational dust, vapors, hazardous fumes, asbestos as well as air pollution have all been shown to be contributing factors. In very rare cases, COPD results from a genetic disorder that causes low levels of a protein called alpha-1-antitrypsin.

Early Warning Signs
Early warning signs of COPD are unique to each person and you may not even realize that you are having trouble breathing. Therefore we have put together some signs to watch for. If you find that you have any of these symptoms you may want to talk to your doctor since a change, combination or increase in the symptoms I have listed may be an early warning sign of COPD.

Are You Experiencing One Or More Of The Following:
1. An increase in the amount of sputum produced (Sputum: The mucus and other matter brought up from the lungs, bronchi, and trachea that one may cough up and spit out or swallow)
2. An increase in the thickness or stickiness of sputum
3. A change in sputum color to yellow or green or the presence of blood in the sputum
4. An increase in the severity of shortness of breath, cough and/or wheezing
5. Using more pillows or sleeping in a chair instead of a bed to avoid shortness of breath
6. A general feeling of ill health
7. Ankle swelling
8. Forgetfulness, confusion, slurring of speech and sleepiness
9. Increasing morning headaches, dizzy spells, restlessness
10. Trouble sleeping
11. An unexplained increase or decrease in weight
12. Increased feeling of fatigue and lack of energy that is persistent
13. A lack of sexual drive

Once COPD has been diagnosed, early treatment is most effective, timely assessment of your symptoms can help you and your healthcare provider decide the type of treatment that will most benefit you.

Many of our guests have chosen to augment their treatment of COPD with more holistic approaches designed to strengthening their immune systems. They feel that eating raw living foods diet, drinking wheatgrass and taking wheatgrass baths, enemas and implants, help to alleviate many of their COPD symptoms. Guests also use herbs and supplements. to enhance their ability to deal effectively with COPD. Some of the herbs and supplements our guests seem to find helpful are:

Herbs & Supplements
1. Comfrey leaves – help because they stimulate new cell growth and support quick healing. This makes it an excellent natural remedy for the lungs. It inhibits the cough reflex, softens and soothes damaged and inflamed bronchial mucus membranes. It helps to loosen mucus from the bronchial tubes so that it does not accumulate. You can buy comfrey leaf or root in various forms. Check with your Doctor before taking this herb.
2. Black tea – many COPD sufferers turn to tea for relief from tightening in the chest. Black tea contains chemicals related to the stimulant theophylline, which is also the basis of many modern medical remedies. Three or four cups of black tea can open airway passages and ease breathing.
3. Ginkgo – when used regularly the active ingredient has helped some patients to cut down on prescribed medication. Taken three times a day for a week or a month at a time. Ginkgo helps relax the lungs and keeps the breathing passage clear. Check with your Doctor before taking this herb.
4. Vitamin C and magnesium – improves lung function.
5. Pleurisy Root – possesses a specific action on the lungs, assisting expectoration, subduing inflammation and exerting a general mild tonic effect on the system, making it valuable in all chest complaints. It is of great use in pleurisy, mitigating the pain and relieving the difficulty of breathing, and is also recommended in pulmonary catarrh. The infusion may be prepared by taking 1 teaspoonful of the powder in a cupful of boiling water. The decoction is taken in doses of 2 to 3 fluid ounces. The dose of the fluid extract is 1/2 to 1 drachm; of Asclepin, 1 to 4 grains. A much-recommended herbal recipe is: Essence of composition powder, 1 OZ.; fluid extract of Pleurisy Root, 1 OZ. Mix and take a teaspoonful three or four times daily in warm water. Doctor before taking this herb.
6. Yerba Santa Holy Herb – medicines prepared with it or its extracts to treat bronchial and laryngeal problems. In addition, in combination with other herbs such as Grindelia robusta (good for Asthmatic bronchitis) yerba santa is also effective in curing insistent pulmonary infections, hay fever and asthma. There is no proven safe or effective dose for yerba santa in adults. Traditionally, 1-2 milliliters of fluid extract has been taken by mouth with a spoon every 3-4 hours for no more than ten days.

If you have questions about any Creative Health Institute program conact Robert (Bobby) Morgan, health education director.

CHI DETOX – Family Style

Jimmy Ehrhart, 15


Jessica Ehrhart, 12

Standing in front of a small group of Creative Health Institute guests with a Sharpie in hand and a smile on his face, Jimmy Ehrhart, 15, recorded numbers on a large pad of paper propped upon an easel.

“I feel great right now,” Jimmy told the other guests who were going through a 10-day detox with him. It was the beginning of Day 8 and relief had come for Jimmy and others who had experienced the typical uncomfortable symptoms people have when they withdraw from sugar, caffeine, high-protein and high-fat foods.  “I feel better than I have ever felt—honestly.”

The Camden, Michigan, teen was front-and-center for the morning and happy about the progress everybody was making  with the detox. Jimmy came to CHI with his younger sister, older brother, mother and grandfather. All of them wanted to make significant changes to their diets and health. They decided to go raw after reading books such as Victoria Boutenko’s Raw Family and watching videos including Thirty Days Raw.  Now that their detox at CHI is nearly complete, the family agrees visiting our nutritional education center in Hodunk, Michigan,  has been one of the the best things they’ve ever done together.

Jessica Ehrhart, 12, said she plans to spread the word about the great time she’s had with her family and new friends at  Creative Health Institute.

“I would like to see lots of families come here. I wish everyone in the world could do it because then everyone would just be healthy,” Jessica said. “Fast foods are gross!”

After seeing the videos and reading the books his mother exposed the family to in preparation of their detox, Jimmy still was a bit skeptical about how much a raw food diet could affect him. He was willing to give raw living foods a try because he had some health concerns and wanted to see what a difference the Ann Wigmore way of life could make. Jimmy said for several years he has suffered from asthma, allergies, trouble sleeping, snoring and being overweight.  It’s been tough for him to join the fun and games kids his age typically enjoy.

“I couldn’t play sports.  My friends, they all try to run around town and I have a hard time keeping up to them with the asthma, ” Jimmy said. “It is embarrassing to stay over a friend’s house because I snore so loud.”

Now Jimmy feels a new hope and expects he’ll be able to participate more fully in teenage activities he sees others enjoy.  His snoring stopped right away. He’s been sleeping well every night and his asthma hasn’t been bothering him at all.  He’s been exercising every day and says he feels hopeful that he’ll be able to keep up with his friends in basketball, football and baseball. He has always tried to participate in sports but due to his health issues he has spent most of his time on the bench.

Jimmy also had a problem with food allergies.  He said he especially seemed to be allergic to nuts, particularly cashews. At CHI he has found he can eat all different kinds of nuts without any allergic reaction. He said he believes it’s because he had been eating nuts that were not organic and all of the food at the center is organic.  He said he was really happy to learn that eating a raw food diet doesn’t mean a life-sentence of “boring salads.” He was especially impressed with a raw cashew-cheese-based blueberry cheesecake an intern made one night for a CHI guest who was celebrating her birthday during the detox.

Jessica said all along she was excited to come to the Creative Health Institute with her family. She said she knew she needed to make some changes in her life and she was ready to move forward.

“I would like to improve my asthma and coming here definitely helped it,” she said. “I was always on the couch. I couldn’t breathe so I always had to have an inhaler wherever I went. It is really horrible.”

Jessica hasn’t had to use her inhaler once during the 10-day detox.  On day eight she reported feeling better than she has felt in a very long time. She said she has “tons” of energy and now she can breath without wheezing — something she hasn’t been able to do since she was a small child.

One of Jessica’s favorite things about the 10-day detox at CHI has been the cooking lessons. Jessica helped make marinara sauce to serve at dinner one night and she said she was surprised by how simple and tasty it was. She also has enjoyed rebounding (jumping on a miniature trampoline) in the morning and sitting in the banya (our Russian-style sauna). She said she really wants to come back for the raw chef classes to learn how to make gourmet raw living foods.

Jimmy and Jessica’s mother, Kimberly Ehrhart, said she’s very happy her family came to CHI together to detox with raw living food. She’s eager for her next visit and suggesting to staff that she’d like to see a CHI reunion for guests in the summer.

“I would highly suggest the 10-day detox,” Kimberly said.  “It’s more than cleansing for your body and mind, and it’s more than just new relationships — it’s family.”

*********

For more information about our 10-Day Detox and other programs at the Creative Health Institute, click HERE or contact us by e-mail at info@creativehealthinstitute.com or by phone at 866-426-1213. Our relaxing rural setting is south of Battle Creek, between Detroit and Chicago. We look forward to seeing you soon!  Wishing everyone the best health ever…

Robert Morgan – Bobby

Health & Education Director

Why Has Obesity Gotten Worse Over The Years?

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Bobby Say’s Two Ounces Of Almonds Contain More Protein Than A Typical Egg

Almond Nutrients

Nutrient Amount DV
(%)
Nutrient
Density
World’s Healthiest
Foods Rating
Manganese- 0.90 mg 45.0 3.9 very good
vitamin E 8.97 mg 44.9 3.9 very good
magnesium 98.67 mg 24.7 2.2 good
tryptophan 0.07 g 21.9 1.9 good
copper 0.40 mg 20.0 1.7 good
vitamin B2 (riboflavin) 0.30 mg 17.6 1.5 good
phosphorus 168.70 mg 16.9 1.5 good

The Nutritional Power In 1 Cup Of Raw Tomatoes

The following information was covered in a lecture I gave on the nutrient density of raw living food when compared to cooked foods. I shared this information with Creative Health Institute (CHI) students in October 2009. I hope it helps you to appreciate the amazing health benefits we receive, when we eat the way we were intended to eat. Dr. Ann Wigmore’s teachings have inspired me to research the science or raw living foods. I am planning on adding an additional section to the blog that focuses on raw living food nutrition.

Peace, Blessings, Love & Gratitude,

Bobby

Nutrients In One Cup Of Tomatoes

Protein: 1.58 g – The recommended daily protein requirements for humans are derived from “ideal body weight”. The ideal body weight is calculated based on height and varies slightly for men and women.

Our protein requirements can also be expressed in terms of total caloric intake, The World Health Organization (WHO), and many national health agencies have independently conducted studies, which (even though they differ slightly) all conclude our daily protein requirement should be between 10% to 15% of our daily caloric intake. Proteins are necessary for building the structural components of the human body, such as muscles and organs. You also need proteins to keep your immune system healthy, synthesize neurotransmitters, create and signal hormones, and much more. A balanced raw living food diet supplies the body with all of the protein it needs. Living food protein is found in nuts, seeds, sprouts, vegetables and sweet and non-sweet fruits.

Calcium: 18 mg – daily requirement is 1000 -1200 mg. Calcium is a mineral that gives strength to bones and teeth. It is important for muscle contraction, blood clotting, and nerve function. Calcium is the most abundant mineral in the body.Good sources – sunflower seeds, dark-green leafy vegetables

Iron: 0.49 mg – Daily requirement 8 mg a day for men 16 mg a day for women. Iron is a mineral found in every living cell. It is part of red blood cells and muscle proteins. Iron helps the blood cells and muscles to carry and hold oxygen and then release it when needed. Iron is essential to make enzymes and hormones. Good sources – dark-green vegetables,

Magnesium: 20 mg – Daily requirement – 420 mg/day for Males · 320 mg/day for Females. Magnesium is a mineral important for muscle contractions, a healthy nervous system, immune system and strong bones. It is involved in hundreds of enzyme reactions in the body. Good sources seeds, nuts, dark green vegetables, wheat grass. 

Phosphorus: 43 mg – Daily requirement 700 mg/day.  Phosphorous is a critical component of every cell. It works with the B vitamins to generate energy. Phosphorus is necessary for growth of bones and teeth; bones and teeth are 85% phosphorous. It works with sodium and potassium to maintain acid-base balance, and assist in muscle contraction, kidney function, heartbeat regulation, and in nerve conduction. Second to calcium in the body. Bones and teeth are 85% Phosphorus. Good sources all fruits, vegetables, nuts and seeds, and sprouts.

Potassium:427 mg No minimum RDA An adequate daily amount of potassium for adults is 4,700 mg/ day. Potassium maintains heartbeat and is important in many metabolic reactions. It balances fluid inside and outside the cells to maintain normal cell function. Potassium blunts the rise of blood pressure in response to excess dietary sodium. A high potassium diet might help prevent bone loss and kidney stones. Good sources – The highest sources are apricots, figs, prunes, bananas, oranges and orange juice, cantaloupe, honeydew, sweet potatoes and tomatoes

Sodium: 9 mg –  250 -500 mg a day is sufficient. Our  kidneys conserve and release sodium as needed. For “salt-sensitive” people, blood pressure will increases in direct proportion to increases in sodium intake. About 60% of adults with high blood pressure are salt sensitive. Blood pressure above120 systolic/80 diastolic is high. In countries where sodium intake is low, there is less hypertension, cardiovascular disease and stroke. Excess sodium may also weaken the bones by promoting calcium excretion.

Zinc: 0.31 mg The RDA for Zinc for healthy adults is:11 mg/day for healthy males 8 mg/day for healthy females. Zinc is a mineral that is needed for growth, especially during pregnancy and childhood, and for tissue building and repair. It is involved in wound healing, maintaining a healthy immune system, and cell reproduction. Zinc is a component of over 100 enzymes in the body. Good sources – sunflower seeds pumpkin seeds, Almonds pine nuts, pecans, walnuts, cashews, nuts, blackberries and kiwi.

Vitamin C: 22.9 mg  – The Recommended Dietary Allowance is 90 milligrams a day for males and 75 milligrams a day for females. Vitamin C is a powerful antioxidant  protecting cells against oxidizing damage, helps wounds to heal, fights infections, promotes healthy bones, teeth, gums and blood vessels, and aids in the absorption of iron. Good sources -Fruits and vegetables are high in Vitamin C. The highest are red and green peppers, oranges, cantaloupe, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cabbage, and tomatoes. 

Thiamin B Vitamin:0.067 mg – RDA 1.2 mg/day for males and 1.1 mg/day for females. Thiamin is a water soluble B vitamin, also known as vitamin B1. It helps produce energy from carbohydrate on a cellular level, and is very important for nerve conduction and muscle function. Alcoholics are very low on Thiamin – Not enough causes BERIBERI , both  wet and dry. Good sources – Brazil nuts, pecans, spinach, tomatoes, cantaloupe and oranges.

Riboflavin B2 Vitamin: 0.034 mg –  adults are 1.3 mg/day for males and 1.1 mg/day for females. Riboflavin is a water-solublevitamin, which helps us get energy from carbohydrates. It is important for growth and red blood cell production. It also helps to convert the amino acid, tryptophan, to the B vitamin, niacin. Good sources- Almonds,  broccoli, asparagus, and spinach.

Niacin B Vitamin: 1.069 mg The RDA for niacin (as NE) in healthy adults is 16 mg/day for males and 14 mg/day for females. Niacin is a water-soluble B vitamin, essential for energy metabolism in the cells, the proper functioning of the gastrointestinal and nervous systems, healthy skin, and the release of energy from carbohydrates, fats and protein. Affects the proper functioning of over 50 much-needed enzymes in the body. Niacin also has the ability to lower the LDL cholesterol (coined as bad cholesterol) level and prevent build-up of plaque on arterial walls. Good sources –  Niacin rich foods include almonds and seeds, wheat grass, green leafy vegetables, carrots, turnips and celery.

Pantothenic Acid – B Complex Vitamin:0.160 mg – 5mg a day is good. Pantothenic Acid is a water-soluble vitamin that is one of the B complex vitamins. It is involved in the release of energy from carbohydrates and helps to metabolize protein, fat and carbohydrates from food. Pantothenic acid plays a part in 100 different chemical reactions needed to produce lipids, steroids, hemoglobin, and other substances in the body. Good Sources – mushrooms, avocadoes, broccoli, and sweet potatoes.

Vitamin B6:0.144 mg – 1.3 – 1.7 mg per day. Vitamin B6, is a water-soluble vitamin needed by the nervous and immune systems. Vitamin B6 helps nerve cells to communicate. It is involved in making hormones, insulin, antibodies, and cell membranes, and is needed for the normal breakdown of protein, carbohydrates and fat. Vitamin B6 helps to maintain blood sugar within the normal range. Vitamin B6 also aids in the formation of niacin from the amino acid, tryptophan. Good sources – bananas, spinach, leafy greens, wheat grass, sprouts.

Folate:27 mcg –  The RDA for folic acid is 400 micrograms /day. Folate is one of several B vitamins found in foods. It is vital for making new, healthy body cells. Low Folate causes –  General weakness, fatigue, depression, gastrointestinal problems, and frequent infections. Good sources – strawberries and citrus fruits and juices; leafy green vegetables such as spinach and romaine lettuce, wheatgrass Folic acid, a man-made form of folate.

Vitamin A:1500 IU – International Units (IU) on food and supplement labels. Adult men require 3000 IU/day and women need 2310 IU/day. There is no RDA for provitamin A. Vitamin A is needed for: Vision, immunity, growth and reproduction. It keeps the mucous linings of he respiratory, urinary, and intestinal tracts healthy to prevent bacteria and viruses from entering.  Vitamin A is usually abundant in colorful fruits and vegetables is in a form that can be converted to Vitamin A (provitamin A). Carotenoids, like beta-carotene, are examples of provitamin A.  Good sources – Pro vitamin A is found in dark green and bright orange vegetables and fruits like spinach, sweet potatoes carrots, cantaloupe, apricots, tomatoes and others. Deeper colors are associated with higher levels of  Pro Vitamin A.

Vitamin E:0.97 mg – The RDA for vitamin E for adults is 15mg/day. Vitamin E is an antioxidant that protects cells membranes from damage. It is particularly important for cells that carry oxygen like the cells of lungs and red blood cells. Vitamin E also has a role in immune function, DNA repair, and other metabolic processes. Good Sources – seeds, nuts,  wheat grass, sprouts, dark green leafy vegetables (like spinach, etc.), and tomato.

Vitamin K:14.2 mcg  – Vitamin K aids blood clotting, protects the heart, and helps to build bones. Allow your blood to clot normally; Helps protect against osteoporosis; Prevent oxidative cell damage.
Good sources – the major source of Vitamin K is green, leafy, vegetables – kale, collards, spinach, and turnip greens are the highest.

Phytonutrients

Beta Carotene:808 mcg. Beta Carotene, as an anti-oxidant, supports the cardiovascular system. And, after the body transforms Beta Carotene to Vitamin A, it helps maintain the health of the skin, immune system, and eyes. Vitamin A is an essential component of the epithelial cells which guard us from environmental toxins. Beta carotene both lowers cholesterol and helps minimize arterial hardening. It may also benefit sufferers of cataracts, cancer, AIDS, high blood pressure, heart disease, Alzheimer’s disease, rheumatoid arthritis, headaches, and asthma. Beta carotene may also, because of its ability to act as a powerful antioxidant within the human body help prevent cancer and heart disease. In addition, because anti-oxidants neutralize the cell-structure damaging chemical reactions of free radical, beta carotene may slow free radical related aging and disease. A Harvard University study indicated that those who take 50mg of beta carotene daily have their risk of heart attacks and strokes cut in half! Beta carotene will also improve vision and skin conditions like psoriasis and eczema, and beta carotene acts to prevent the development of precancerous cells mouth and respiratory tract.

Lycopene: 4631 mcg. Lycopene is a natural pigment that gives the tomato its red colour.  It is also one of our most powerful antioxidants. Antioxidants have a protective effect on our cells and are often described as being ‘anti-aging’. Lycopene in particular has been noted for its ability to protect DNA and prevent disease, and it continues to be the subject of studies on heart disease and cancer. Lycopene is  released when the food is cooked or when the cell walls are broken down by a high speed blender. Good Sources – Tomatoes and other bright colored vegetables.

Lutein: 221 mcg. Lutein is concentrated in the retinas of your eyes and is necessary for good vision. A diet rich in lutein may lower your risk of developing cataract and macular degeneration. Lutein may also help prevent or slow down atherosclerosis, the thickening of arteries, which is a major risk for cardiovascular disease. Good Sources – Carrots, squash and other orange and yellow fruits and vegetables are sources of lutein. Green leafy vegetables, such as spinach, also contain high amounts of lutein.

I hope this information will help you to better understand how important it is that we have a good variety of fresh fruits, leafy greens, sprouts, nuts and seeds in our diet.

Blessings,

Robert Morgan – Bobby

Health & Education Director

Creative Health Institute

Union City,  Michigan 49094

866.426.1213