Learning to Live the Robust Raw Life

 

Ann Hartenbach of Winneconne Wisconsin had a gentle epiphany on Thursday after breakfast.

It was the day something shifted inside Ann, who has lost 18 pounds since arriving at Creative Health Institute May 1. Following the 10-Day-Detox Program she participated in, Ann became an intern. And this week she’s been getting experience preparing food in our raw kitchen.

She had been through detox programs at CHI in the past and reaped emotional, spiritual and physical rewards from them.  The 10-Day Detox she went through this month was extremely beneficial, too. But the experience she has been gaining behind the scenes in the kitchen since her internship began is really what’s helping Ann take her raw living foods lifestyle to another level.

“The kitchen supervisors create confidence and show how easy the lifestyle can be,” Ann said. “I feel I can go home now and know  what to buy and how long to keep it.”

Ann’s new-found confidence in the kitchen helped her to look at a bowl of leftover oatmeal from breakfast and see a future batch of oatmeal cookies. Before long, Ann was mixing together ingredients from an oatmeal cookie recipe developed for Creative Health Institutes own Master Chef and creator of the Raw Chef Level 1 Certification Class, Bobby Morgan.

Her cookies were a huge hit and other interns were eating them right out of the dehydrator.

It was her first batch of raw cookies. Now that she realizes it’s just as simple to make raw cookies as it is to make baked cookies, Ann expects to be doing quite a bit of “un”baking.

Ann recommends the CHI internship program for budding raw foodists who want to learn more at an accelerated pace.

And for those who can’t commit three months for an internship, she still recommends  the 10-Day Detox program.

“The detox is more than just losing weight. It clears toxins leaving you with a clear head and lighter feeling, ” Ann said.

She is so grateful for all she is learning at Creative Health Institute — and for her new confidence to continue the lifestyle when she returns home.

“Good tasting healthy food is in abundance,” Ann said. “Healthy food does not have to be without flare, spice and richness.”

Bobby’s Really Rawsome Oatmeal Cookies ©

  • 2 cups oats
  • 1/2 cup dates
  • 1/2 cup dried raisins
  • 1/2 cup raw walnuts coarsely chopped
  • ¼ cup of raw agave or honey
  • 2 apples grated
  • ½ cup of macadamia nuts finely ground- (leave out a dozen to chunk up and put in the batter)
  • ½ cup cashew nuts finely ground – (leave out a dozen to chunk up and put in the batter)
  • ½ teaspoon of sea salt
  • 1 teaspoon of vanilla

Place oats  in a food processor and pulse two short bursts. If you don’t have a food processor, use a blender. Transfer the oats to a mixing bowl and add the dates, raisins, walnuts agave or honey and apples and mix the batter well. Set aside.

Robert (Bobby) Morgan

Master Raw Chef

Creative Health Institute

 

 

 

Excerpts from The Wheatgrass Book by Ann Wigmore

More great information from the wheatgrass place, Creative Health Institute…

WHEATGRASS JUICE…

Increases red blood-cell count and lowers blood pressure. It cleanses the blood, organs and gastrointestinal tract of debris. Wheatgrass also stimulates metabolism and the body’s enzyme systems by enriching the blood. It also aids in reducing blood pressure by dilating the blood pathways throughout the body.

Stimulates the thyroid gland, correcting obesity, indigestion, and a host of other complaints.

Restores alkalinity to the blood. The juice’s abundance of alkaline minerals helps reduce over-acidity in the blood. It can be used to relieve many internal pains, and has been used successfully to treat peptic ulcers, ulcerative colitis, constipation, diarrhea, and other complaints of the gastrointestinal tract.

Is a powerful detoxifier, and liver and blood protector. The enzymes and amino acids found in wheatgrass can protect us from carcinogens like no other food or medicine. It strengthens our cells, detoxifies the liver and bloodstream, and chemically neutralizes environmental pollutants.

Fights tumors and neutralizes toxins. Recent studies show that wheatgrass juice has a powerful ability to fight tumors without the usual toxicity of drugs that also inhibit cell-destroying agents. The many active compounds found in grass juice cleanse the blood and neutralize and digest toxins in our cells.

Contains beneficial enzymes. Whether you have a cut finger you want to heal or you desire to lose five pounds…enzymes must do the actual work. The life and abilities of the enzymes found naturally in our bodies can be extended if we help them from the outside by adding exogenous enzymes, like the ones found in wheatgrass juice. Don’t cook it. We can only get the benefits of the many enzymes found in grass by eating it uncooked. Cooking destroys 100 percent of the enzymes in food.

Has remarkable similarity to our own blood. The second important nutritional aspect of chlorophyll is its remarkable similarity to hemoglobin, the compound that carries oxygen in the blood. Dr. Yoshihide Hagiwara, president of the Hagiwara Institute of Health in Japan, is a leading advocate for the use of grass as food and medicine. He reasons that since chlorophyll is soluble in fat particles, and fat particles are absorbed directly into the blood via the lymphatic system, that chlorophyll can also be absorbed in this way. In other words, when the “blood” of plants is absorbed in humans it is transformed into human blood, which transports nutrients to every cell of the body.

When used as a rectal implant, reverses damage from inside the lower bowel. An implant is a small amount of juice held in the lower bowel for about 20 minutes. In the case of illness, wheatgrass implants stimulate a rapid cleansing of the lower bowel and draw out accumulations of debris.

Externally applied to the skin can help eliminate itching almost immediately.

Will soothe sunburned skin and act as a disinfectant. Rubbed into the scalp before a shampoo, it will help mend damaged hair and alleviate itchy, scaly, scalp conditions.

Is soothing and healing for cuts, burns, scrapes, rashes, poison ivy, athlete’s foot, insect bites, boils, sores, open ulcers, tumors, and so on. Use as a poultice and replace every two to four hours.

Works as a sleep aide. Merely place a tray of living wheatgrass near the head of your bed. It will enhance the oxygen in the air and generate healthful negative ions to help you sleep more soundly.

Enhances your bath. Add some to your bath water and settle in for a nice, long soak.

Sweetens the breath and firms up and tightens gums. Just gargle with the juice.

Neutralizes toxic substances like cadmium, nicotine, strontium, mercury, and polyvinyl chloride.

Offers the benefits of a liquid oxygen transfusion since the juice contains liquid oxygen. Oxygen is vital to many body processes: it stimulates digestion (the oxidation of food), promotes clearer thinking (the brain utilizes 25% of the body’s oxygen supply), and protects the blood against anaerobic bacteria. Cancer cells cannot exist in the presence of oxygen.

Turns gray hair to its natural color again and greatly increases energy levels when consumed daily.

Is a beauty treatment that slows down the aging process when the juice is consumed. Wheatgrass will cleanse your blood and help rejuvenate aging cells, slowing the aging process way down, making you feel more alive right away. It will help tighten loose and sagging skin.

Lessens the effects of radiation. One enzyme found in wheatgrass, SOD, lessens the effects of radiation and acts as an anti-inflammatory compound that may prevent cellular damage following heart attacks or exposure to irritants.

Restores fertility and promotes youthfulness.

Can double your red blood cell count just by soaking in it. Renowned nutritionist Dr. Bernard Jensen found that no other blood builders are superior to green juices and wheatgrass. In his book Health Magic Through Chlorophyll from Living Plant Life he mentions several cases where he was able to double the red blood cell count in a matter of days merely by having patients soak in a chlorophyll-water bath. Blood building results occur even more rapidly when patients drink green juices and wheatgrass regularly.

Our deepest thanks to Dr. Ann Wigmore and all of those who have given so much to help us renew our health.

Wishing everyone a blessed day,

Robert Morgan

Director

Creative Health Institute

15 Food Combining Guidelines

Food Combining Guidelines

  1. Avoid eating carbohydrates, starches, sugar or sweet fruits with acid fruits.  Too many times we mix: (strawberries and bananas) (cereal with strawberries) (pineapple upside down cake).
  2. Avoid eating concentrated proteins with concentrated carbohydrates.  (meat and potatoes) 
  3. Do not consume two concentrated proteins at the same meal. (meat and cheese*) (nuts and cheese) (shrimp and steak) (avocado and nuts) 
  4. Do not consume fats with proteins. (cheese* and meat again) 
  5. Use fats sparingly.  Beware of many items in the store that say “no fat” in their sales pitch.  They wouldn’t contain fat anyway. (animal fats, dairy products, palm oil, cottonseed oil and coconut) 
  6. Do not eat acid fruits with proteins.  Some lemon juice is fine on proteins.  Avocados combine well with acid fruit, sub-acid fruit and greens. (pineapple and ham) (tomatoes, meat, noodles – goulash, spaghetti) 
  7. Do not combine sweet fruits with proteins, starches or acid fruits, a common dessert mistake. (bananas on cereals) (strawberries and bananas) (dried fruit dehydrates the stomach). 
  8. Eat only one concentrated starch at a meal (potatoes, corn, pumpkin, etc.). 
  9. Acid fruits may be used with sub-acid fruits.  Don’t combine fruits opposite ends; combine at mid-ground. 
  10. Sub-acid fruits may be used with sweet fruit. 
  11. Combine fruit only with lettuce and celery.  Lettuce and celery may even enhance fruit digestion. 
  12. Salads combine very well with proteins, oil and starches.  Greens should make up a majority of our diet.  They leave the stomach quickly unless weighed down by oily dressings.
  13. Sprouts are great.  The best way to eat grains: referring back to #12, salads go well with starches or grains, so sprouts are great with salad. 
  14. Do not consume melons with any other foods.  They move through the stomach in 20 minutes.  If melons don’t agree with you, try them alone. 
  15. Liquids should not be used at any meal.  Dilutes your digestive juices / Prevents us from chewing / Prevents us from secreting saliva. 

 *Keep in mind Creative Health Institutes program does not include meat, dairy, or any other food products linked to animals.

Wishing everyone the best year ever.

Bobby Morgan

Director

Creative Health Instituute

A Brief History Of Wheatgrass

“Wheatgrass juice is the nectar of rejuvenation, the plasma of youth, the blood of all life. The elements that are missing in our body’s cells – especially enzymes, vitamins, hormones, and nucleic acids can be obtained through this daily green sunlight transfusion”. Viktoras Kulvinskas, Author of Survival into the Twenty First Century

Throughout the history of wheatgrass, it has been recognized for its beneficial health effects.  Mankind has always known that livestock showed improved health and vigor when they feed on the young grasses of early spring.  Herdsmen have moved their livestock across every continent in search of the best grass for the their animals.

Today, grass is the world’s most widespread form of vegetation. There are over 9,000 species of grass found across the planet, covering more than 25% of all earths land mass. You will find grass wherever there is sun, water and soil. Grass has truly become recognized as the staff of life with four of the world’s top five crops being grains/grasses.

The use of wheatgrass can be traced back more than six thousand years, to ancient early Mesopotamian and Egyptian civilizations.

Five thousand years ago, Egyptians were using wheatgrass for health purposes. The Priests, Pharaohs and powerful members of ancient Egyptian society used wheatgrass on a regular basis, believing that it improved their health.

Nebuchadnezzar, king of the Babylonian Empire, and builder of the Hanging Gardens reigned  from 605 BC – 562 BC.,  reportedly restricted his diet to grasses and attributed the health benefits of this magnificent chlorophyll rich plant to the improvement of his physical and mental health.

Almost two thousand years ago, during the first century A.D., we find a Jewish sect known as the Essene’s using wheatgrass as a healing food.  From their holy book The Gospel of Peace, translated by Edmund Bordeaux Szekely, we read:

We may eat also of the tender blades of grass that the strength of the Earthly Mother may enter into us. But chew well the blades, for the Son of Man has teeth unlike those of beasts, and only when we chew well the blades of grass can the Angel of Water enter our blood and give us strength. Eat, then, Sons of Light, of this most perfect herb from the table of our Earthly Mother, that your days may be long upon the earth, for such finds favor in the eyes of God.”

Welcome to Wheatgrass Science in The 20th Century

In 1915 Dr. Richard Willstätter’s pioneering work on natural products; especially chlorophyll was honored with the 1915 Nobel Prize in chemistry. His founding of  the healthful link between the chlorophyll in plants and the hemoglobin in our blood, was the start of  scientific research into how close the composition of  chlorophyll and human blood are. He showed that chlorophyll molecules bonded in in a very similar way as  the iron molecule in hemoglobin.

Close to the time of  Dr. Willstätter’s work and discover of the wonder of chlorphyll,  in the laboratory, war had broken out across Europe and in the small county of Lithuania, a young girl named Ann Wigmore watched as her grandmother treated soldiers with it and later used wheatgrass to treat her own colon disease.

In the late 1920’s and early 1930’s scientists including Charles Francis Schnabel were studying grasses and green leafy vegetables and unlocking the nutritional mysteries. They tested all types of vegetable and meat based feeds and found that animals could did not only survive on grass but thrived on it, but, in contrast, their health failed when they were fed other healthy vegetables, including green leafy vegetables.

In 1931 Charles Francis Schnabel an American school teacher and agricultural chemist who is kindly referred to as the “father of wheatgrass” discovered  that wheat and barley grasses reached their nutritional peak at or just prior to the commencement of the jointing stage. Being an agricultural chemist, the focus of his studies were based in developing feeds for livestock which would  help them recover more quickly from sickness, grow faster and increase fertility. His research proved to be the the most indepth study of its time proving the nutritional value of grasses and how the nutritonal values changed through different stages of the plant’s life.

Struck by the power of wheatgrass, Charles Schnabel started promoting his discoveries to feed mills, chemists and the food industry. Two large corporations that are still with us today (Quaker Oats and American Dairies) invested millions of dollars into funding further research.  Joined by others, such as biochemist George Kohler, his passion inspired a body of scientific research and much of his research finding served as the basis of Dr. Ann Wigmores devleopment of wheatgrass therapy.

The “Wheatgrass Juice Factor”

In the mid 1930s, at the University of Wisconsin, Dr. George Kohler and his colleagues were studying the differences in the nutritional value of cow’s milk produced at different seasons of the year. Although they thrived on summer milk, experimental rats and guinea pigs failed to grow and eventually became sick and died when fed winter milk. The higher nutritional value of the summer milk was found to be due to the grasses eaten by the cows in the spring and summer. Thus began research on the “Grass Juice Factor”, a water soluble extract of grass juice which was responsible for this growth effect.

Most of the individual vitamins that we know about today, were identified during the 1930s by scientists working to identify all the nutritional factors necessary for growth and reproduction in humans and domestic animals.

Scientist were amazed to find that when they added green chlorophyll rich foods to the diets of test animals, the growth and health effects of cereal grass and the “Grass Juice Factor” were far our stripping any other type of supplementation. By the late 1930s, dehydrated and dried cereal grasses were available in several forms for use as a human and animal food supplements.

After many years of research and testing, the scientists at the  University of Wisconsin determine the highest levels of  the  “Grass Juice Factor”, was found in cereal grass (wheatgrass), young white clover, peas, and cabbage.

At the University of California at Berkeley, Dr. Mott Cannon and his colleagues found that guinea pigs failed rapidly when fed a stock ration plus high levels of all the then-known nutrients. When the researchers added standard food supplements such as liver extracts, wheat germ, and brewer’s yeast to the animals’ diets, the guinea pigs remained sick and often died. Addition of grass or grass juice brought about dramatic recovery and restimulated growth in these animals.

In 1935, Danish researchers discovered vitamin K, the “koagulation vitamin”. Because this nutrient was difficult to isolate in large quantities, cereal grasses were used in lieu of purified vitamin K—both for research and for medical therapy.

In 1938 Folic acid was identified, being named after the green leaves, or foliage, which proved to be its richest source. Scientists knew they were on to something as they observed the health and growth benefits that the known vitamins and minerals in the  cereal grasses provided.  Other benefits, however, could not be attributed to known nutrients.

In the early 1940’s, Dr. Charles Kettering (former chairman of the board of General Motors) donated money for the study of chlorophyll. Chlorophyll was studied intensively by medical doctors (there are currently over 40 articles written up in medical journals about the healing effects of chlorophyll.) These medical doctors found that chlorophyll was a great healer.

In 1940, in the American Journal of Surgery,  Benjamin Cruskin, M.D., recommends chlorophyll for its antiseptic benefits. The article suggests the following clinical uses for chlorophyll:

“To clear up foul-smelling odours, neutralize strep infections, heal wounds, hasten skin grafting, cure chronic sinusitis, overcome ear inflammation and infections, reduce varicose veins and heal leg ulcers, eliminate impetigo and other scabby eruptions, heal rectal sores, successfully treat inflammation of the uterine cervix, get rid of parasitic vaginal infections, reduce typhoid fever, and cure advanced pyorrhea in many cases”.

Through the 1940s and 1950s, scientist continued to research the potential of cereal grasses and their effect on humans and animals. Expanded research led to their finding that cereal grass was shown to contain factors which support the growth of lactobacilli and other beneficial intestinal bacteria, block the development of scurvy, stop the formation of histamine induced and peptic ulcers.

Other Unidentified Health Factors in Cereal Grasses

By 1950, all the nutrients now considered essential to the human diet (with the exception of selenium) had been identified. But researchers continued to describe green food “factors” which could not be correlated with any known nutrient.

I see a world without sickness…a world in complete harmony and in perfect physical, mental, and spiritual balance by following nature’s laws of cause and effect. – Ann Wigmore

In the late 1950’s early 1960’s Ann Wigmore “re-discovered” wheatgrass and was able to cure her own ‘untreatable’ colon cancer. She also had been a terrible accident which had crushed her legs, gangrene set in and the doctors wanted to amputate her legs. Ann had made friends with Dr. Earp Thomas, who believed that wheatgrass was one of the most powerful healing foods known to man. Dr. Thomas found that an ounce of wheatgrass in a gallon of fluoridated water would turn the fluorine into harmless calcium-phosphate-fluoride compound. Used in wash water it adds softness to the face and hands. It stops bleeding, eases itching, and helps in wound healing . Dr. Thomas further discovered that fruits and vegetables contaminated by sprays were thoroughly cleaned and the negative food transformed by wash water with a wisp of wheatgrass placed in the water.

As Ann spent untold hours with her mentor, Dr. Thomas and as she learned more and more about the medicinal effects of grass, she decided to heal herself of her disease and her injuries. She began drinking fresh wheatgrass and eating natural raw living foods. She shared wheatgrass with several sick friends and along with her, each recovered from their sickness.

Drinking wheatgrass should not be considered a one-stop cure all. Although wheatgrass has helped hundreds of thousands of people recover from serious illness, it is neither a drug nor a magic bullet. Here at Creative Health Institute, (CHI) wheatgrass  is grown on the premises and serves as one of our nutritional cornerstones in our full body detoxification and rebuilding health process.  We believe that when our guests take in substantial quanities of wheatgrass along with raw living foods and take the time address their lifestyle physically, spiritually and  their mental and emotional state they can create an immune system that will not be as greatly affected by illness We invite you to join us on the wonderful journey of health and happiness.

Love & blessings,

Bobby

“Until man duplicates a blade of grass, Nature can laugh at his so-called scientific knowledge.” – Thomas A. Edison

The Nutritional Power In 1 Cup Of Raw Tomatoes

The following information was covered in a lecture I gave on the nutrient density of raw living food when compared to cooked foods. I shared this information with Creative Health Institute (CHI) students in October 2009. I hope it helps you to appreciate the amazing health benefits we receive, when we eat the way we were intended to eat. Dr. Ann Wigmore’s teachings have inspired me to research the science or raw living foods. I am planning on adding an additional section to the blog that focuses on raw living food nutrition.

Peace, Blessings, Love & Gratitude,

Bobby

Nutrients In One Cup Of Tomatoes

Protein: 1.58 g – The recommended daily protein requirements for humans are derived from “ideal body weight”. The ideal body weight is calculated based on height and varies slightly for men and women.

Our protein requirements can also be expressed in terms of total caloric intake, The World Health Organization (WHO), and many national health agencies have independently conducted studies, which (even though they differ slightly) all conclude our daily protein requirement should be between 10% to 15% of our daily caloric intake. Proteins are necessary for building the structural components of the human body, such as muscles and organs. You also need proteins to keep your immune system healthy, synthesize neurotransmitters, create and signal hormones, and much more. A balanced raw living food diet supplies the body with all of the protein it needs. Living food protein is found in nuts, seeds, sprouts, vegetables and sweet and non-sweet fruits.

Calcium: 18 mg – daily requirement is 1000 -1200 mg. Calcium is a mineral that gives strength to bones and teeth. It is important for muscle contraction, blood clotting, and nerve function. Calcium is the most abundant mineral in the body.Good sources – sunflower seeds, dark-green leafy vegetables

Iron: 0.49 mg – Daily requirement 8 mg a day for men 16 mg a day for women. Iron is a mineral found in every living cell. It is part of red blood cells and muscle proteins. Iron helps the blood cells and muscles to carry and hold oxygen and then release it when needed. Iron is essential to make enzymes and hormones. Good sources – dark-green vegetables,

Magnesium: 20 mg – Daily requirement – 420 mg/day for Males · 320 mg/day for Females. Magnesium is a mineral important for muscle contractions, a healthy nervous system, immune system and strong bones. It is involved in hundreds of enzyme reactions in the body. Good sources seeds, nuts, dark green vegetables, wheat grass. 

Phosphorus: 43 mg – Daily requirement 700 mg/day.  Phosphorous is a critical component of every cell. It works with the B vitamins to generate energy. Phosphorus is necessary for growth of bones and teeth; bones and teeth are 85% phosphorous. It works with sodium and potassium to maintain acid-base balance, and assist in muscle contraction, kidney function, heartbeat regulation, and in nerve conduction. Second to calcium in the body. Bones and teeth are 85% Phosphorus. Good sources all fruits, vegetables, nuts and seeds, and sprouts.

Potassium:427 mg No minimum RDA An adequate daily amount of potassium for adults is 4,700 mg/ day. Potassium maintains heartbeat and is important in many metabolic reactions. It balances fluid inside and outside the cells to maintain normal cell function. Potassium blunts the rise of blood pressure in response to excess dietary sodium. A high potassium diet might help prevent bone loss and kidney stones. Good sources – The highest sources are apricots, figs, prunes, bananas, oranges and orange juice, cantaloupe, honeydew, sweet potatoes and tomatoes

Sodium: 9 mg –  250 -500 mg a day is sufficient. Our  kidneys conserve and release sodium as needed. For “salt-sensitive” people, blood pressure will increases in direct proportion to increases in sodium intake. About 60% of adults with high blood pressure are salt sensitive. Blood pressure above120 systolic/80 diastolic is high. In countries where sodium intake is low, there is less hypertension, cardiovascular disease and stroke. Excess sodium may also weaken the bones by promoting calcium excretion.

Zinc: 0.31 mg The RDA for Zinc for healthy adults is:11 mg/day for healthy males 8 mg/day for healthy females. Zinc is a mineral that is needed for growth, especially during pregnancy and childhood, and for tissue building and repair. It is involved in wound healing, maintaining a healthy immune system, and cell reproduction. Zinc is a component of over 100 enzymes in the body. Good sources – sunflower seeds pumpkin seeds, Almonds pine nuts, pecans, walnuts, cashews, nuts, blackberries and kiwi.

Vitamin C: 22.9 mg  – The Recommended Dietary Allowance is 90 milligrams a day for males and 75 milligrams a day for females. Vitamin C is a powerful antioxidant  protecting cells against oxidizing damage, helps wounds to heal, fights infections, promotes healthy bones, teeth, gums and blood vessels, and aids in the absorption of iron. Good sources -Fruits and vegetables are high in Vitamin C. The highest are red and green peppers, oranges, cantaloupe, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cabbage, and tomatoes. 

Thiamin B Vitamin:0.067 mg – RDA 1.2 mg/day for males and 1.1 mg/day for females. Thiamin is a water soluble B vitamin, also known as vitamin B1. It helps produce energy from carbohydrate on a cellular level, and is very important for nerve conduction and muscle function. Alcoholics are very low on Thiamin – Not enough causes BERIBERI , both  wet and dry. Good sources – Brazil nuts, pecans, spinach, tomatoes, cantaloupe and oranges.

Riboflavin B2 Vitamin: 0.034 mg –  adults are 1.3 mg/day for males and 1.1 mg/day for females. Riboflavin is a water-solublevitamin, which helps us get energy from carbohydrates. It is important for growth and red blood cell production. It also helps to convert the amino acid, tryptophan, to the B vitamin, niacin. Good sources- Almonds,  broccoli, asparagus, and spinach.

Niacin B Vitamin: 1.069 mg The RDA for niacin (as NE) in healthy adults is 16 mg/day for males and 14 mg/day for females. Niacin is a water-soluble B vitamin, essential for energy metabolism in the cells, the proper functioning of the gastrointestinal and nervous systems, healthy skin, and the release of energy from carbohydrates, fats and protein. Affects the proper functioning of over 50 much-needed enzymes in the body. Niacin also has the ability to lower the LDL cholesterol (coined as bad cholesterol) level and prevent build-up of plaque on arterial walls. Good sources –  Niacin rich foods include almonds and seeds, wheat grass, green leafy vegetables, carrots, turnips and celery.

Pantothenic Acid – B Complex Vitamin:0.160 mg – 5mg a day is good. Pantothenic Acid is a water-soluble vitamin that is one of the B complex vitamins. It is involved in the release of energy from carbohydrates and helps to metabolize protein, fat and carbohydrates from food. Pantothenic acid plays a part in 100 different chemical reactions needed to produce lipids, steroids, hemoglobin, and other substances in the body. Good Sources – mushrooms, avocadoes, broccoli, and sweet potatoes.

Vitamin B6:0.144 mg – 1.3 – 1.7 mg per day. Vitamin B6, is a water-soluble vitamin needed by the nervous and immune systems. Vitamin B6 helps nerve cells to communicate. It is involved in making hormones, insulin, antibodies, and cell membranes, and is needed for the normal breakdown of protein, carbohydrates and fat. Vitamin B6 helps to maintain blood sugar within the normal range. Vitamin B6 also aids in the formation of niacin from the amino acid, tryptophan. Good sources – bananas, spinach, leafy greens, wheat grass, sprouts.

Folate:27 mcg –  The RDA for folic acid is 400 micrograms /day. Folate is one of several B vitamins found in foods. It is vital for making new, healthy body cells. Low Folate causes –  General weakness, fatigue, depression, gastrointestinal problems, and frequent infections. Good sources – strawberries and citrus fruits and juices; leafy green vegetables such as spinach and romaine lettuce, wheatgrass Folic acid, a man-made form of folate.

Vitamin A:1500 IU – International Units (IU) on food and supplement labels. Adult men require 3000 IU/day and women need 2310 IU/day. There is no RDA for provitamin A. Vitamin A is needed for: Vision, immunity, growth and reproduction. It keeps the mucous linings of he respiratory, urinary, and intestinal tracts healthy to prevent bacteria and viruses from entering.  Vitamin A is usually abundant in colorful fruits and vegetables is in a form that can be converted to Vitamin A (provitamin A). Carotenoids, like beta-carotene, are examples of provitamin A.  Good sources – Pro vitamin A is found in dark green and bright orange vegetables and fruits like spinach, sweet potatoes carrots, cantaloupe, apricots, tomatoes and others. Deeper colors are associated with higher levels of  Pro Vitamin A.

Vitamin E:0.97 mg – The RDA for vitamin E for adults is 15mg/day. Vitamin E is an antioxidant that protects cells membranes from damage. It is particularly important for cells that carry oxygen like the cells of lungs and red blood cells. Vitamin E also has a role in immune function, DNA repair, and other metabolic processes. Good Sources – seeds, nuts,  wheat grass, sprouts, dark green leafy vegetables (like spinach, etc.), and tomato.

Vitamin K:14.2 mcg  – Vitamin K aids blood clotting, protects the heart, and helps to build bones. Allow your blood to clot normally; Helps protect against osteoporosis; Prevent oxidative cell damage.
Good sources – the major source of Vitamin K is green, leafy, vegetables – kale, collards, spinach, and turnip greens are the highest.

Phytonutrients

Beta Carotene:808 mcg. Beta Carotene, as an anti-oxidant, supports the cardiovascular system. And, after the body transforms Beta Carotene to Vitamin A, it helps maintain the health of the skin, immune system, and eyes. Vitamin A is an essential component of the epithelial cells which guard us from environmental toxins. Beta carotene both lowers cholesterol and helps minimize arterial hardening. It may also benefit sufferers of cataracts, cancer, AIDS, high blood pressure, heart disease, Alzheimer’s disease, rheumatoid arthritis, headaches, and asthma. Beta carotene may also, because of its ability to act as a powerful antioxidant within the human body help prevent cancer and heart disease. In addition, because anti-oxidants neutralize the cell-structure damaging chemical reactions of free radical, beta carotene may slow free radical related aging and disease. A Harvard University study indicated that those who take 50mg of beta carotene daily have their risk of heart attacks and strokes cut in half! Beta carotene will also improve vision and skin conditions like psoriasis and eczema, and beta carotene acts to prevent the development of precancerous cells mouth and respiratory tract.

Lycopene: 4631 mcg. Lycopene is a natural pigment that gives the tomato its red colour.  It is also one of our most powerful antioxidants. Antioxidants have a protective effect on our cells and are often described as being ‘anti-aging’. Lycopene in particular has been noted for its ability to protect DNA and prevent disease, and it continues to be the subject of studies on heart disease and cancer. Lycopene is  released when the food is cooked or when the cell walls are broken down by a high speed blender. Good Sources – Tomatoes and other bright colored vegetables.

Lutein: 221 mcg. Lutein is concentrated in the retinas of your eyes and is necessary for good vision. A diet rich in lutein may lower your risk of developing cataract and macular degeneration. Lutein may also help prevent or slow down atherosclerosis, the thickening of arteries, which is a major risk for cardiovascular disease. Good Sources – Carrots, squash and other orange and yellow fruits and vegetables are sources of lutein. Green leafy vegetables, such as spinach, also contain high amounts of lutein.

I hope this information will help you to better understand how important it is that we have a good variety of fresh fruits, leafy greens, sprouts, nuts and seeds in our diet.

Blessings,

Robert Morgan – Bobby

Health & Education Director

Creative Health Institute

Union City,  Michigan 49094

866.426.1213

Really Rawsome Oatmeal Cookies

Really Rawsome Oatmeal Cookies

  • 2 cups oats
  • 1/2 cup dates
  • 1/2 cup dried raisins
  • 1/2 cup raw walnuts coarsely chopped
  • ¼ cup of raw agave or honey
  • 2 apples grated
  • ½ cup of macadamia nuts finely ground- (leave out a dozen to chunk up and put in the batter)
  • ½ cup cashew nuts finely ground – (leave out a dozen to chunk up and put in the batter)
  • ½ teaspoon of sea salt
  • 1 teaspoon of vanilla                                                                                                                                                     

Place oats  in a food processor and pulse two short bursts. If you don’t have a food processor, use a blender. Transfer the oats to a mixing bowl and add the dates, raisins, walnuts agave or honey and apples and mix the batter well. Set aside.

In a coffee grinder grind the macadamia’s and cashews until they resemble a silky flour. Add to the batter and stir in.  On a mesh dehydrator sheet shape the batter. Keep in mind that the thicker you shape the cookies the longer they take to dehydrate. Dehydrate the cookies at 110 degrees until they reach your preferred texture, around 12 hours.

May you be blessed,

Bobby

Exotic Herbs Which May Help Contol And Help Reverse Diabetes…

We do not recommend ever utilizing herbs for medicinal purposes without discussing them with your doctor. Creative Health Institutes twenty-one day diabetes reversal program is based in our belief that a living body needs living food and when it is supplied a variety of living foods it will respond and heal itself.  We considered, it wise for you to refer to your family doctor before proceeding to enter into any treatments.

Bitter Gourd appears to have a very positive affect on keeping sugar spikes down and insulin levels stable. Many diabetics consume bitter gourd as a regularly as part of their diet. Bitter gourd is also been shown to have many other  health benefits.

Bitter gourd is a tropical vegetable, which is cultivated mainly in the Asian and African countries. It is also known by the name of ‘Karela’ and has a rough, warty skin. As the name suggests, the vegetable is bitter in taste and has a skin that is dark green in color.

Diabetics usually consume bitter gourd in the form of a powder or juice, but it is also used in traditional Asian dishes. The standard protocol is to consume bitter gourd first thing in the morning.  Many diabetics sprinkle bitter gourd on their first meal of the day. While others feel its better to consume it alone, or if in a powder form mix it with warm water and drink it.

Butea Leaves, is another amazing herb from India.  Though the tree has many other healing properties it isthe leaf when boiled, that releases  the phytochemicals which almost immediately reduce blood sugar. The picture that should have been here (sorry)  shows the flowering of the pods on the tree. Each pod has a seed that when dried and powered becomes a very powerful worm and parasite remover.  In Ayurveda medicine the leaf a also chewed.

 Cinnamonis such an amazing herb and of all the exotic herbs its most familiar to North Americana.  What is not generally known is that cinnamon is antiviral and  is  strong stimulator of insulin activity and is very beneficial in the treatment of diabetes and many other health challenges which require the reduction of viral pathogens and the regulation of blood sugar. It helps to keep the blood sugar in check and has been shown to be more powerful than turmeric, cloves or bay leaves.  Like most herbs the bark and twigs of the cinnamon tree has many other uses in helping our bodies to overcome health challenges.

Curry Leaves, is being shown to be a major player in the reversal of diabetes. Researchers from the department of pharmacy at King’s College London say they have found scientific justification for the use of alternative medicine.  Scientists believe that the Indian curry leaf  may contain phyto-chemicals which slow down the rate of starch-to-glucose breakdown in people with diabetes. The tree’s leaves could have the ability to control the amount of glucose entering the bloodstream. Chewing on ten fully grown leave every morning is believed to help with the lowering blood sugar and to help the pancreas to regulate insulin. chewing curry leaves is also said to help with weight loss. Its is estimated that 80% of the baby boomers are overweight and that many of them are suffering from the effects of type 2 diabetes. 

Fenugreek is easy to grow right in your kitchen and had the ability to control glucose metabolis and at the same time it  has a strong modulating effect on blood lipid levels which may substantially reduce the risk of atherosclerosis. Most diabetics, have lipid imbalances, Fenugreek has demonstrated to have the remarkable ability to lower cholesterol, triglycerides and LDL levels while raising HDL levels (good cholesterol) .

Fenugreek Seeds can be consumed in man different ways and forms. Some people eat the spouts and seeds raw before retiring while others put them in with juices and drinks. You can also purchase the powdered form. Another way to get the benefits of fenugreek is to soak the seeds in the water overnight and drink them along with the water the next morning. 

Indian Gooseberry a middle-sized tree and is indigenous to India. The berry can only be harvested about 3 months of the year. The berry is high in Vitamin C helps in controlling diabetes. The juice of the Indian Gooseberry can be added to bitter gourd and with a small amount of honey as a carrier, this combination is  thought to be an excellent way to diabetes since it provides nutrients for the pancreas, helping to release insulin.

Even though there is little to worry about when taking these natural herbs, they still might have interaction with whatever medication you are taking. It is better to be safe than sorry. This list of exotic herbs is not an exhaustive one and there are many more that are believed to have a great affect on diabetes.  I am planning on discussing them in the near future, any help or information from our readers as to what they have found would be greatly appreciated.

Love and Blessings,

Bobby