You Can Learn How To Reverse The Effects Of Your Diabetes Now!

We Believe

We believe every diabetic should have the opportunity to have a say in their treatment, and to try a natural holistic approach to addressing their disease before they are given over to a lifetime of dangerous medications.

What We Offer

We find that all of the students who come to us for the purpose of learning diabetes self-care management and taking personal charge of reversing the effects of their type II diabetes have been able to do so; In fact, all of them have learned how to address their diabetes challenge and have lowered or eliminated their need for diabetic medications.

From their first day with us, they begin experiencing the reversal of the effects of the disease and in as little as two to three day’s many of them experience the joy of seeing their blood sugar beginning to normalize.

It doesn’t’ matter what the cause of our student’s diabetes is, whether it’s due to lack of insulin, its ineffectiveness when the body fails to use the insulin properly, or their body is not producing enough insulin.  So no matter what type of diabetes challenge our students face, they will be able to participate in the reversal process and experience a reduction or elimination of medications, by just following the dietetic changes we teach them.

 “Maintaining a diet with more consumption of raw vegetables, five fruits a day, and plenty of water is highly recommended in beating diabetes naturally. Adding fiber to food consumption is good not only because it helps move the food out of the intestinal tract but also because their chromium content helps control the blood sugar level.” Roger Guzman, M.D.

We offer a safe and supportive environment, a place of learning where each student is taught, coached and encouraged, to take charge of their diabetes health challenge.  All of our regular, as well as our diabetic students, benefit from our detoxification/rebuild program which works hand in hand with their eating the most nourishing foods on the planet which are inclusive of Dr. Ann Wigmore’s living foods lifestyle, health, and wellness technologies.

Give Yourself Thirty Days

Students who have participated in the diabetes reversal program have been able to drastically lower or eliminate their diabetic medications within 30 days. Everyone deserves to take control of their health and enjoy the freedom from medications and the side effects associated with having to take any kind of diabetic medication.

With more than 5 million people taking insulin every day, the measure of success for a diabetic should be how little medication they need to control their blood sugar levels.  As the above quote indicates, many doctors because of excessive patient loads and not enough hours in the day, find it impossible not to prescribe potentially harmful medications, not having the time to help their patients implement health strategies and technologies that would lower or in most cases eliminate the need for diabetic medications. Many of our students have come to us and found they missed the warning signs associated with diabetes. There are six signs of uncontrolled blood sugar:

  1. Frequent Urination
  2. Blurry Vision
  3. Extreme Thirst
  4. Increased Hunger
  5. Un-warranted Fatigue
  6. Slow Wound Healing

If you are experiencing any of these symptoms, you should immediately seek medical care. Once you have met with your doctor and have stabilized your blood sugar, this is the time to begin considering alternative health strategies, designed to strengthen your immune system and enable you to control your blood sugar with little or no medication.

Remember, if left unchecked, diabetes can lead to many other health complications, including amputation, cardiovascular disease, stroke, high blood pressure, kidney disease, blindness, nervous system disease, and death.

We hope this health update and management protocol will make a positive difference in your life or the life of someone you know. Please pass this information on to anyone who may benefit from knowing more about diabetes or who may want to attend the institute and work on reversing their diabetes.

Do not forget we are here to help and support you in learning how to take control of your health, no matter whether you are newly diagnosed or just needing to taking preventative measures.  If you would like to get more information about us or like to sign up to attend one of our retreats or participate in one of our programs, just fill out the contact form.

Blessings, Bobby

What Are Normal Blood Sugar Levels

Normal blood sugar level range between 80 and 120. A dangerous blood sugar level can mean it is too high or to low. Creative Health Institute does not treat or diagnosis diabetes. After you have been diagnosed diabetes type 2, we can teach you how to work on reversing it and bringing your blood sugar levels into the normal range, usually within 21 days.  Whether you have diabetes or not you should consult your doctor if you  are experiencing symptoms of abnormal blood sugar, or feel that its  not within the normal range.  So consult with your doctor, then you can make an informed decision as to where to go from there.

Some symptoms of abnormal blood sugar levels

  • The first symptom of diabetes is often excessive thirst (unrelated to exercise, hot weather, or short-term illness)
  • Excessive hunger (you know you’ve eaten “enough” but are still hungry all the time)
  • Frequent urination (often noticed because you must wake up repeatedly during the night)
  • Tiredness and fatigue (possibly severe enough to make you fall asleep unexpectedly after meals), one of the most common symptoms of diabetes.

While many of the signs and symptoms of diabetes can also be related to other causes, testing for diabetes is very easy, and the constant/regular presence of one or more of these symptoms over an extended period of time should be checked by a physician.

If diabetes is suspected, tested for, and diagnosed when those symptoms first start appearing, other more serious symptoms of advanced diabetes can often be prevented or have their onset significantly delayed through diet, exercise and proper blood sugar management.

However, often the ‘minor’ symptoms of diabetes go unrecognized, and physical and neurological problems may arise, resulting in some of the following symptoms:

  • Blurred vision(diabetes can lead to macular degeneration and eventual blindness)
  • Numbness and/or tingling in the hands and feet.  (symptoms of diabetes which causes nerve damage in the extremities)
  • Slow healing of minor scratches and wounds (diabetes often leads to impaired immune system function)
  • Recurrent or hard-to-treat yeast infections in women (another sign of impaired immune function)
  • Dry or itchy skin (peripheral neuropathy also affects circulation and proper sweat gland function)

If you or someone you know are experiencing these symptoms an appointment with a physician should be made as soon as possible.

Reversing Diabetes Is Possible – We See It Happen Every Week At Creative Health Institute

By Val Willingham, CNN
January 28, 2011 10:02 a.m. EST
"It was a big wake-up call, that what I was doing and my current weight were not OK," Jonathan Legg said.
“It was a big wake-up call, that what I was doing and my current weight were not OK,” Jonathan Legg said.
STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • Jonathan Legg began to exercise every day, changed diet to reverse diabetes
  • Diabetes is caused when there is too much glucose or sugar in the body
  • Type 1 diabetes was once known as juvenile diabetes; it’s usually diagnosed in children

For more information on diabetes watch this weekend’s special edition of “SGMD“: “Diabetes 20/20,” Saturday-Sunday, 7:30 a.m. ET

Bethesda, Maryland (CNN) — When Jonathan Legg of Bethesda, Maryland, got a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes at 39, he was shocked.

“I had always been pretty active,” said Legg. “But it was a big wake-up call, that what I was doing and my current weight were not OK.”

That was two years ago. Since that time, the Morgan Stanley executive decided to make some changes and reverse his diabetes. Although his doctor recommended he go on medication to control his illness, Legg took a different approach. Instead of meds, he began to exercise every day and changed his diet, cutting out alcohol, fatty foods and watching his carbs.

Do you have diabetes? How well are you managing it?

“I wanted to be able to know the changes I was making were making a difference, and it wasn’t the drug,” said Legg.

According to new statistics just out from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 25.8 million people, or 8.3% of the U.S. population, are affected by either type 1 or type 2 diabetes. Most, like Legg, have type 2 diabetes, which in many people develops later in life. Caused primarily by genetic makeup, a sedentary lifestyle and poor eating habits, type 2 diabetes can be reversed in some cases. By making changes to their lives such as adding exercise and improving their diets, many type 2 diabetics can drop their glucose or sugar numbers back to the normal range, reversing their condition.

Diabetes type-2 can be reversed
 
“We have seen numerous people reverse their condition,” says Dr. Michelle Magee, director of the MedStar Diabetes Institute in Washington. “But it takes a real dedication for the rest of their lives,” she notes.

So why do exercise and diet help reverse diabetes? To answer that question, we first need to know why people get diabetes in the first place.

Diabetes is caused when there is too much glucose or sugar in the body. We get sugar from the things we eat. The body is designed to process sugar so it can enter our cells and provide energy. But glucose can’t enter our cells without insulin, which is a hormone produced by the pancreas.

If you have diabetes, your body isn’t making any or is not making enough insulin — or it can’t properly use the insulin it is producing. As a result, too much sugar stays in the blood. If this occurs for a long time, it can lead to serious problems.

Tips for dealing with diabetes

Type 1 diabetes was once known as juvenile diabetes because it’s usually diagnosed in children and young adults. About 5% to 10% of all people with diabetes have this type, which is not reversible because the person’s pancreas is not producing insulin at all.

The remainder have type 2 diabetes. For these people, their body can no longer process insulin correctly. Although genetics plays a part, obesity is a major reason people develop type 2 diabetes.

“We know that excess body weight adversely affects every organ system in the body,” says Dr. Gary Foster, director of Temple University’s Center for Obesity Research and Education in Philadelphia. “So it shouldn’t be surprising that as obesity increases, as it has over the past 30 years, that medical conditions, especially conditions like type 2 diabetes, will also increase.”

People who carry excess weight, especially in their midsection, are more likely to develop type 2 diabetes because the fat in their tissues causes an imbalance of insulin in the body. The condition is called insulin resistance. If they can eliminate that fat by exercising and limiting carbohydrates and alcohol, then many can drop their glucose levels. And for some, they can drop them back into the normal range.

This is also true for people who are prediabetic. According to the CDC, 79 million Americans are prediabetic, which means their glucose readings fall between 100 and 125 while fasting. According to the American Diabetes Association, normal glucose readings are 100 and below when a person has not eaten anything. Numbers above 125 while fasting are considered to be in the diabetic range. So when you’re prediabetic, it’s easier to turn those numbers around. And that’s important, because once you become a diabetic, even if you drop your numbers, you will always be classified as a diabetic, making it difficult to acquire good insurance.

“Once you fall into that glucose range, you are considered at high risk for developing the condition again,” says Magee.

“That’s why we are working on a program right now that goes into the community and reaches those who are at risk of being prediabetic or diabetic,” Magee said. “The results have been so positive, the CDC is looking at the program as a possible protocol for other hospitals to follow.”

As for Jonathan Legg, his numbers are no longer in the diabetic range. He’s lost 40 pounds and watches everything he eats.

“I educated myself, I read the labels,” said Legg. “I enjoy what I eat. I met with nutritionists, and they helped me build a game plan.”

His physician, Dr. Lucy McBride says it’s more than just diet; it’s also the types of foods that Legg eats.

“He cut out significant amounts of sugar and carbs in his diet, really changed how he ate,” says McBride. “He’s increased fiber, increased protein, cut back on alcohol, which is really sugar.”

But McBride notes Legg needs to be tenacious.

“I told him, encouraged as I was, and proud and pleased [but] he’s got to keep up those lifestyle habits for things to stay in the right direction,” McBride said. “Without exercise, without diet and without weight control, the diabetes will come back. It’s something he will need to manage his whole life.”

That’s something Legg says he would rather do than live as a diabetic.

If you are a diabetic and want to improve your life. Call us at 866.426.1213 and talk  to our Health Education Director, Robert Morgan “Bobby” and learn how easy it is to put diabetes behind you – forever!

CHI DETOX – Family Style

Jimmy Ehrhart, 15


Jessica Ehrhart, 12

Standing in front of a small group of Creative Health Institute guests with a Sharpie in hand and a smile on his face, Jimmy Ehrhart, 15, recorded numbers on a large pad of paper propped upon an easel.

“I feel great right now,” Jimmy told the other guests who were going through a 10-day detox with him. It was the beginning of Day 8 and relief had come for Jimmy and others who had experienced the typical uncomfortable symptoms people have when they withdraw from sugar, caffeine, high-protein and high-fat foods.  “I feel better than I have ever felt—honestly.”

The Camden, Michigan, teen was front-and-center for the morning and happy about the progress everybody was making  with the detox. Jimmy came to CHI with his younger sister, older brother, mother and grandfather. All of them wanted to make significant changes to their diets and health. They decided to go raw after reading books such as Victoria Boutenko’s Raw Family and watching videos including Thirty Days Raw.  Now that their detox at CHI is nearly complete, the family agrees visiting our nutritional education center in Hodunk, Michigan,  has been one of the the best things they’ve ever done together.

Jessica Ehrhart, 12, said she plans to spread the word about the great time she’s had with her family and new friends at  Creative Health Institute.

“I would like to see lots of families come here. I wish everyone in the world could do it because then everyone would just be healthy,” Jessica said. “Fast foods are gross!”

After seeing the videos and reading the books his mother exposed the family to in preparation of their detox, Jimmy still was a bit skeptical about how much a raw food diet could affect him. He was willing to give raw living foods a try because he had some health concerns and wanted to see what a difference the Ann Wigmore way of life could make. Jimmy said for several years he has suffered from asthma, allergies, trouble sleeping, snoring and being overweight.  It’s been tough for him to join the fun and games kids his age typically enjoy.

“I couldn’t play sports.  My friends, they all try to run around town and I have a hard time keeping up to them with the asthma, ” Jimmy said. “It is embarrassing to stay over a friend’s house because I snore so loud.”

Now Jimmy feels a new hope and expects he’ll be able to participate more fully in teenage activities he sees others enjoy.  His snoring stopped right away. He’s been sleeping well every night and his asthma hasn’t been bothering him at all.  He’s been exercising every day and says he feels hopeful that he’ll be able to keep up with his friends in basketball, football and baseball. He has always tried to participate in sports but due to his health issues he has spent most of his time on the bench.

Jimmy also had a problem with food allergies.  He said he especially seemed to be allergic to nuts, particularly cashews. At CHI he has found he can eat all different kinds of nuts without any allergic reaction. He said he believes it’s because he had been eating nuts that were not organic and all of the food at the center is organic.  He said he was really happy to learn that eating a raw food diet doesn’t mean a life-sentence of “boring salads.” He was especially impressed with a raw cashew-cheese-based blueberry cheesecake an intern made one night for a CHI guest who was celebrating her birthday during the detox.

Jessica said all along she was excited to come to the Creative Health Institute with her family. She said she knew she needed to make some changes in her life and she was ready to move forward.

“I would like to improve my asthma and coming here definitely helped it,” she said. “I was always on the couch. I couldn’t breathe so I always had to have an inhaler wherever I went. It is really horrible.”

Jessica hasn’t had to use her inhaler once during the 10-day detox.  On day eight she reported feeling better than she has felt in a very long time. She said she has “tons” of energy and now she can breath without wheezing — something she hasn’t been able to do since she was a small child.

One of Jessica’s favorite things about the 10-day detox at CHI has been the cooking lessons. Jessica helped make marinara sauce to serve at dinner one night and she said she was surprised by how simple and tasty it was. She also has enjoyed rebounding (jumping on a miniature trampoline) in the morning and sitting in the banya (our Russian-style sauna). She said she really wants to come back for the raw chef classes to learn how to make gourmet raw living foods.

Jimmy and Jessica’s mother, Kimberly Ehrhart, said she’s very happy her family came to CHI together to detox with raw living food. She’s eager for her next visit and suggesting to staff that she’d like to see a CHI reunion for guests in the summer.

“I would highly suggest the 10-day detox,” Kimberly said.  “It’s more than cleansing for your body and mind, and it’s more than just new relationships — it’s family.”

*********

For more information about our 10-Day Detox and other programs at the Creative Health Institute, click HERE or contact us by e-mail at info@creativehealthinstitute.com or by phone at 866-426-1213. Our relaxing rural setting is south of Battle Creek, between Detroit and Chicago. We look forward to seeing you soon!  Wishing everyone the best health ever…

Robert Morgan – Bobby

Health & Education Director

Obesity: Ten Things You Thought You Knew

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Millions Die Due to Withheld Medical Treatment

This post is by Dr. Mark Hyman, MD.
Dr. Hyman’s insight into the world of conventional medicine and how it affects our lives is amazing. I hope you will take the time to read all of it. Wishing you the greatest of health and blessings.
Bobby
Imagine we found the cure for heart disease or diabetes, but as a society chose to withhold that treatment from those who need it most. Would it be ethical to withhold effective treatments when the result is unnecessary suffering and death that costs our health care system hundreds of billions of dollars a year?

The answer is obvious, yet that is exactly what occurs today in America. We know the most effective treatments for some of the deadliest diseases of our time, but millions are denied access to them. In effect, we are conducting a large experiment on our population without their consent. This happened in America once before. It is a dark stain on our scientific history that most of us would rather forget. It was the Tuskegee experiment.

Tuskegee: Human Experimentation Without Consent

From 1932 to 1972 scientists from the US Public Health Service conducted the Tuskegee syphilis study on 399 impoverished African American sharecroppers from Tuskegee, Alabama without their consent. They withheld a known effective treatment for syphilis–namely penicillin–in order to observe what happened over time to those with untreated syphilis. Scientists wondered how the disease affected the body and mind, so they drew blood from these men and monitored their progress but did nothing to stop the progression of the illness even though they knew they could cure it and prevent horrid disability with a few simple shots of penicillin.

Right now we are in the midst of a similar experiment, but few know about it. The tragedy of this experiment happened in my own family. My stepfather, who had diabetes and heart disease, was a victim of our modern Tuskegee experiment. He ultimately died last year as a result, and cost our health care system $400,000 along the way. If he were simply provided the choice of a different treatment–a treatment that is proven to be more effective and cost less than medication and surgery–namely a program for sustainable and comprehensive lifestyle change, perhaps he would still be alive and our national debt would be reduced by $400,000.

My stepfather was diabetic. He had the best medical, pharmaceutical, and surgical care available. Nonetheless, he suffered from very poor health and functioning. He went to the emergency room with chest pain and was treated with a cardiac bypass operation, even though evidence has shown no reduced mortality for cardiac bypass or angioplasty in diabetics.(i) Not providing effective treatment is one thing, but providing harmful, costly, and ineffective treatment like this is unethical.

Physicians do what they know (often as a result of training in a medical educational system dominated by Big Pharma) and what is paid for by insurance. Having a cardiac bypass after experiencing chest pain isn’t the best treatment option for diabetics, but it is what is paid for by insurance. After the bypass post-operative infection of his sternum with MRSA (an antibiotic-resistant staph bacteria) lead to a month in the intensive care unit, plastic surgery to repair the chest defect, and “mini-strokes” following bypass surgery which led to memory loss or “pre-dementia”,(ii) and a protracted recovery from hospitalization requiring months of home care.

The surgery and subsequent medical therapy with blood pressure medication, cholesterol-lowering medication, and blood thinners did not enhance the quality of his health and life. In fact, he continued to be sedentary, craved sugars and refined carbohydrates, and rapidly declined physically and mentally.

My stepfather was not offered a treatment that exists today, would have cost less than 2 percent of the $400,000 his care cost, and would have likely created an infinitely enhanced quality of life. It should be our right to have access to proven treatments that provide better value for the individual and for the health care system. This shift must be made if we are going to significantly impact our chronic disease epidemic and the frightening convergence of the GDP and health care cost curves.

How is our modern Tuskegee experiment happening today? How did this happen to my stepfather? What treatment was he denied that may have saved his life? Let me explain.

Treatments We are Denied by Conventional Medicine

Overwhelming evidence proves that the most effective prevention and treatment for chronic diseases such as heart disease and diabetes is what we eat, how much we exercise, how we handle stress, and our social connections. These factors are often referred to collectively as “lifestyle medicine.” Environmental toxins are also known to play a role in these epidemics but are less modifiable.

Lifestyle medicine is not just about preventing chronic diseases but also about treating them. It is often more effective and less expensive than relying exclusively on drugs and surgery. Nearly all the major medical societies recently joined in publishing a review of the scientific evidence for lifestyle medicine both for the prevention and TREATMENT of chronic disease. That report is called the ACPM Lifestyle Initiative, and I encourage you to read it. It concluded there is strong evidence that a lifestyle-based approach to chronic disease often works better than medication or surgery and saves money.

Taken collectively, the evidence is actually overwhelming. Lifestyle intervention is often more effective in reducing cardiovascular disease, hypertension, heart failure, stroke, cancer, diabetes and all cause mortality than almost any other medical intervention.(iii) This data in conjunction with a number of extraordinary recent research papers that call into question the very foundations of our current approach–treating risk factors such as high blood pressure, high cholesterol, or high blood sugar to prevent heart disease and diabetes–forces us to rethink our whole approach to medicine. These studies showed that lowering blood pressure, blood sugar, and cholesterol in pre-diabetics with medication didn’t reduce the risk of heart attacks or death and created unnecessary side effects.(iv),(v),(vi),(vii)

We’re targeting the wrong things–we need to treat the cause, not the effects. High blood pressure, high cholesterol, and high blood sugar are NOT the cause of heart disease or diabetes. The real culprit is what we eat, how much we exercise, stress, and environmental toxins. Our lifestyle and environment influences the fundamental biological mechanisms that lead to disease: Changes in gene expression, which modulate inflammation, oxidative stress, and metabolic dysfunction. Treating risk factors is like blowing away the smoke while the fire rages on. Lifestyle medicine puts out the fire.

Unfortunately, insurance doesn’t usually pay for it. No one profits from lifestyle medicine, so it is not part of medical education or practice. It should be the foundation of our health care system, but doctors ignore it because doctors do what they get paid to do. They get paid to dispense medication and perform surgery. They also need to be paid to develop and conduct practice-based and community programs in sustainable lifestyle change such as those pioneered by Dr. Dean Ornish.

The new health care bill provides for community based wellness initiatives like these, and that’s a step in the right direction. The National Council on Prevention, Health Promotion, and Public Health has begun to develop policies that will create a healthier nation. But what’s missing is insurance and Medicare reimbursement for treatments known to be effective for heart disease and diabetes–lifestyle-based therapies that are critical not just for prevention but also for the treatment and reversal of these modern epidemics. By not offering reimbursement for these treatments we have, in effect, begun the Tuskegee experiment of the 21st century.

The future of medical care must be to transform general lifestyle guidance–the mandates to eat a healthy diet and get regular exercise that many physicians try to provide to their patients–into individually-tailored lifestyle prescriptions for both the prevention and treatment of chronic diseases. The only way this is going to happen is if doctors are paid to do it. Lifestyle is often the best medicine when applied correctly, and it is the only thing that will end our modern Tuskegee experiment.

To your good health,

Mark Hyman, MD

References

(i) BARI 2D Study Group, Frye R.L., August P., Brooks M.M. et al. 2009. A randomized trial of therapies for type 2 diabetes and coronary artery disease. N Engl J Med. 360(24): 2503-15.

(ii) Neurological Outcome Research Group and the Cardiothoracic Anesthesiology Research Endeavors Investigators, Newman M.F., Kirchner J.L., Phillips-Bute B.,et al. 2001, Longitudinal assessment of neurocognitive function after coronary-artery bypass surgery. N Engl J Med. 344(6): 395-402.

(iii) http://www.acpm.org/LifestyleMedicine.htm

(iv) The ACCORD Study Group. 2010. Effects of intensive blood-pressure control in type 2 diabetes mellitus. N Engl J Med. 362(17): 1575-1585.

(v) The NAVIGATOR Study Group. 2010. Effect of nateglinide on the incidence of diabetes and cardiovascular events. N Engl J Med. 362(16): 1463-1476.

(vi) The NAVIGATOR Study Group. 2010. Effect of valsartan on the incidence of diabetes and cardiovascular events. N Engl J Med. 362(16): 1477-1490.

(vii) Ray K.K., Seshasai S.R., Wijesuriya S, et al. 2009. Effect of intensive control of glucose on cardiovascular outcomes and death in patients with diabetes mellitus: A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. Lancet. 373(9677): 1765-72.

Mark Hyman, M.D. is a practicing physician, founder of The UltraWellness Center, a four-time New York Times bestselling author, and an international leader in the field of Functional Medicine. You can follow him on Twitter, connect with him on LinkedIn, watch his videos on YouTube, become a fan on Facebook, and subscribe to his newsletter.

The Nutritional Power In 1 Cup Of Raw Tomatoes

The following information was covered in a lecture I gave on the nutrient density of raw living food when compared to cooked foods. I shared this information with Creative Health Institute (CHI) students in October 2009. I hope it helps you to appreciate the amazing health benefits we receive, when we eat the way we were intended to eat. Dr. Ann Wigmore’s teachings have inspired me to research the science or raw living foods. I am planning on adding an additional section to the blog that focuses on raw living food nutrition.

Peace, Blessings, Love & Gratitude,

Bobby

Nutrients In One Cup Of Tomatoes

Protein: 1.58 g – The recommended daily protein requirements for humans are derived from “ideal body weight”. The ideal body weight is calculated based on height and varies slightly for men and women.

Our protein requirements can also be expressed in terms of total caloric intake, The World Health Organization (WHO), and many national health agencies have independently conducted studies, which (even though they differ slightly) all conclude our daily protein requirement should be between 10% to 15% of our daily caloric intake. Proteins are necessary for building the structural components of the human body, such as muscles and organs. You also need proteins to keep your immune system healthy, synthesize neurotransmitters, create and signal hormones, and much more. A balanced raw living food diet supplies the body with all of the protein it needs. Living food protein is found in nuts, seeds, sprouts, vegetables and sweet and non-sweet fruits.

Calcium: 18 mg – daily requirement is 1000 -1200 mg. Calcium is a mineral that gives strength to bones and teeth. It is important for muscle contraction, blood clotting, and nerve function. Calcium is the most abundant mineral in the body.Good sources – sunflower seeds, dark-green leafy vegetables

Iron: 0.49 mg – Daily requirement 8 mg a day for men 16 mg a day for women. Iron is a mineral found in every living cell. It is part of red blood cells and muscle proteins. Iron helps the blood cells and muscles to carry and hold oxygen and then release it when needed. Iron is essential to make enzymes and hormones. Good sources – dark-green vegetables,

Magnesium: 20 mg – Daily requirement – 420 mg/day for Males · 320 mg/day for Females. Magnesium is a mineral important for muscle contractions, a healthy nervous system, immune system and strong bones. It is involved in hundreds of enzyme reactions in the body. Good sources seeds, nuts, dark green vegetables, wheat grass. 

Phosphorus: 43 mg – Daily requirement 700 mg/day.  Phosphorous is a critical component of every cell. It works with the B vitamins to generate energy. Phosphorus is necessary for growth of bones and teeth; bones and teeth are 85% phosphorous. It works with sodium and potassium to maintain acid-base balance, and assist in muscle contraction, kidney function, heartbeat regulation, and in nerve conduction. Second to calcium in the body. Bones and teeth are 85% Phosphorus. Good sources all fruits, vegetables, nuts and seeds, and sprouts.

Potassium:427 mg No minimum RDA An adequate daily amount of potassium for adults is 4,700 mg/ day. Potassium maintains heartbeat and is important in many metabolic reactions. It balances fluid inside and outside the cells to maintain normal cell function. Potassium blunts the rise of blood pressure in response to excess dietary sodium. A high potassium diet might help prevent bone loss and kidney stones. Good sources – The highest sources are apricots, figs, prunes, bananas, oranges and orange juice, cantaloupe, honeydew, sweet potatoes and tomatoes

Sodium: 9 mg –  250 -500 mg a day is sufficient. Our  kidneys conserve and release sodium as needed. For “salt-sensitive” people, blood pressure will increases in direct proportion to increases in sodium intake. About 60% of adults with high blood pressure are salt sensitive. Blood pressure above120 systolic/80 diastolic is high. In countries where sodium intake is low, there is less hypertension, cardiovascular disease and stroke. Excess sodium may also weaken the bones by promoting calcium excretion.

Zinc: 0.31 mg The RDA for Zinc for healthy adults is:11 mg/day for healthy males 8 mg/day for healthy females. Zinc is a mineral that is needed for growth, especially during pregnancy and childhood, and for tissue building and repair. It is involved in wound healing, maintaining a healthy immune system, and cell reproduction. Zinc is a component of over 100 enzymes in the body. Good sources – sunflower seeds pumpkin seeds, Almonds pine nuts, pecans, walnuts, cashews, nuts, blackberries and kiwi.

Vitamin C: 22.9 mg  – The Recommended Dietary Allowance is 90 milligrams a day for males and 75 milligrams a day for females. Vitamin C is a powerful antioxidant  protecting cells against oxidizing damage, helps wounds to heal, fights infections, promotes healthy bones, teeth, gums and blood vessels, and aids in the absorption of iron. Good sources -Fruits and vegetables are high in Vitamin C. The highest are red and green peppers, oranges, cantaloupe, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cabbage, and tomatoes. 

Thiamin B Vitamin:0.067 mg – RDA 1.2 mg/day for males and 1.1 mg/day for females. Thiamin is a water soluble B vitamin, also known as vitamin B1. It helps produce energy from carbohydrate on a cellular level, and is very important for nerve conduction and muscle function. Alcoholics are very low on Thiamin – Not enough causes BERIBERI , both  wet and dry. Good sources – Brazil nuts, pecans, spinach, tomatoes, cantaloupe and oranges.

Riboflavin B2 Vitamin: 0.034 mg –  adults are 1.3 mg/day for males and 1.1 mg/day for females. Riboflavin is a water-solublevitamin, which helps us get energy from carbohydrates. It is important for growth and red blood cell production. It also helps to convert the amino acid, tryptophan, to the B vitamin, niacin. Good sources- Almonds,  broccoli, asparagus, and spinach.

Niacin B Vitamin: 1.069 mg The RDA for niacin (as NE) in healthy adults is 16 mg/day for males and 14 mg/day for females. Niacin is a water-soluble B vitamin, essential for energy metabolism in the cells, the proper functioning of the gastrointestinal and nervous systems, healthy skin, and the release of energy from carbohydrates, fats and protein. Affects the proper functioning of over 50 much-needed enzymes in the body. Niacin also has the ability to lower the LDL cholesterol (coined as bad cholesterol) level and prevent build-up of plaque on arterial walls. Good sources –  Niacin rich foods include almonds and seeds, wheat grass, green leafy vegetables, carrots, turnips and celery.

Pantothenic Acid – B Complex Vitamin:0.160 mg – 5mg a day is good. Pantothenic Acid is a water-soluble vitamin that is one of the B complex vitamins. It is involved in the release of energy from carbohydrates and helps to metabolize protein, fat and carbohydrates from food. Pantothenic acid plays a part in 100 different chemical reactions needed to produce lipids, steroids, hemoglobin, and other substances in the body. Good Sources – mushrooms, avocadoes, broccoli, and sweet potatoes.

Vitamin B6:0.144 mg – 1.3 – 1.7 mg per day. Vitamin B6, is a water-soluble vitamin needed by the nervous and immune systems. Vitamin B6 helps nerve cells to communicate. It is involved in making hormones, insulin, antibodies, and cell membranes, and is needed for the normal breakdown of protein, carbohydrates and fat. Vitamin B6 helps to maintain blood sugar within the normal range. Vitamin B6 also aids in the formation of niacin from the amino acid, tryptophan. Good sources – bananas, spinach, leafy greens, wheat grass, sprouts.

Folate:27 mcg –  The RDA for folic acid is 400 micrograms /day. Folate is one of several B vitamins found in foods. It is vital for making new, healthy body cells. Low Folate causes –  General weakness, fatigue, depression, gastrointestinal problems, and frequent infections. Good sources – strawberries and citrus fruits and juices; leafy green vegetables such as spinach and romaine lettuce, wheatgrass Folic acid, a man-made form of folate.

Vitamin A:1500 IU – International Units (IU) on food and supplement labels. Adult men require 3000 IU/day and women need 2310 IU/day. There is no RDA for provitamin A. Vitamin A is needed for: Vision, immunity, growth and reproduction. It keeps the mucous linings of he respiratory, urinary, and intestinal tracts healthy to prevent bacteria and viruses from entering.  Vitamin A is usually abundant in colorful fruits and vegetables is in a form that can be converted to Vitamin A (provitamin A). Carotenoids, like beta-carotene, are examples of provitamin A.  Good sources – Pro vitamin A is found in dark green and bright orange vegetables and fruits like spinach, sweet potatoes carrots, cantaloupe, apricots, tomatoes and others. Deeper colors are associated with higher levels of  Pro Vitamin A.

Vitamin E:0.97 mg – The RDA for vitamin E for adults is 15mg/day. Vitamin E is an antioxidant that protects cells membranes from damage. It is particularly important for cells that carry oxygen like the cells of lungs and red blood cells. Vitamin E also has a role in immune function, DNA repair, and other metabolic processes. Good Sources – seeds, nuts,  wheat grass, sprouts, dark green leafy vegetables (like spinach, etc.), and tomato.

Vitamin K:14.2 mcg  – Vitamin K aids blood clotting, protects the heart, and helps to build bones. Allow your blood to clot normally; Helps protect against osteoporosis; Prevent oxidative cell damage.
Good sources – the major source of Vitamin K is green, leafy, vegetables – kale, collards, spinach, and turnip greens are the highest.

Phytonutrients

Beta Carotene:808 mcg. Beta Carotene, as an anti-oxidant, supports the cardiovascular system. And, after the body transforms Beta Carotene to Vitamin A, it helps maintain the health of the skin, immune system, and eyes. Vitamin A is an essential component of the epithelial cells which guard us from environmental toxins. Beta carotene both lowers cholesterol and helps minimize arterial hardening. It may also benefit sufferers of cataracts, cancer, AIDS, high blood pressure, heart disease, Alzheimer’s disease, rheumatoid arthritis, headaches, and asthma. Beta carotene may also, because of its ability to act as a powerful antioxidant within the human body help prevent cancer and heart disease. In addition, because anti-oxidants neutralize the cell-structure damaging chemical reactions of free radical, beta carotene may slow free radical related aging and disease. A Harvard University study indicated that those who take 50mg of beta carotene daily have their risk of heart attacks and strokes cut in half! Beta carotene will also improve vision and skin conditions like psoriasis and eczema, and beta carotene acts to prevent the development of precancerous cells mouth and respiratory tract.

Lycopene: 4631 mcg. Lycopene is a natural pigment that gives the tomato its red colour.  It is also one of our most powerful antioxidants. Antioxidants have a protective effect on our cells and are often described as being ‘anti-aging’. Lycopene in particular has been noted for its ability to protect DNA and prevent disease, and it continues to be the subject of studies on heart disease and cancer. Lycopene is  released when the food is cooked or when the cell walls are broken down by a high speed blender. Good Sources – Tomatoes and other bright colored vegetables.

Lutein: 221 mcg. Lutein is concentrated in the retinas of your eyes and is necessary for good vision. A diet rich in lutein may lower your risk of developing cataract and macular degeneration. Lutein may also help prevent or slow down atherosclerosis, the thickening of arteries, which is a major risk for cardiovascular disease. Good Sources – Carrots, squash and other orange and yellow fruits and vegetables are sources of lutein. Green leafy vegetables, such as spinach, also contain high amounts of lutein.

I hope this information will help you to better understand how important it is that we have a good variety of fresh fruits, leafy greens, sprouts, nuts and seeds in our diet.

Blessings,

Robert Morgan – Bobby

Health & Education Director

Creative Health Institute

Union City,  Michigan 49094

866.426.1213