The Nutritional Power In 1 Cup Of Raw Tomatoes

The following information was covered in a lecture I gave on the nutrient density of raw living food when compared to cooked foods. I shared this information with Creative Health Institute (CHI) students in October 2009. I hope it helps you to appreciate the amazing health benefits we receive, when we eat the way we were intended to eat. Dr. Ann Wigmore’s teachings have inspired me to research the science or raw living foods. I am planning on adding an additional section to the blog that focuses on raw living food nutrition.

Peace, Blessings, Love & Gratitude,

Bobby

Nutrients In One Cup Of Tomatoes

Protein: 1.58 g – The recommended daily protein requirements for humans are derived from “ideal body weight”. The ideal body weight is calculated based on height and varies slightly for men and women.

Our protein requirements can also be expressed in terms of total caloric intake, The World Health Organization (WHO), and many national health agencies have independently conducted studies, which (even though they differ slightly) all conclude our daily protein requirement should be between 10% to 15% of our daily caloric intake. Proteins are necessary for building the structural components of the human body, such as muscles and organs. You also need proteins to keep your immune system healthy, synthesize neurotransmitters, create and signal hormones, and much more. A balanced raw living food diet supplies the body with all of the protein it needs. Living food protein is found in nuts, seeds, sprouts, vegetables and sweet and non-sweet fruits.

Calcium: 18 mg – daily requirement is 1000 -1200 mg. Calcium is a mineral that gives strength to bones and teeth. It is important for muscle contraction, blood clotting, and nerve function. Calcium is the most abundant mineral in the body.Good sources – sunflower seeds, dark-green leafy vegetables

Iron: 0.49 mg – Daily requirement 8 mg a day for men 16 mg a day for women. Iron is a mineral found in every living cell. It is part of red blood cells and muscle proteins. Iron helps the blood cells and muscles to carry and hold oxygen and then release it when needed. Iron is essential to make enzymes and hormones. Good sources – dark-green vegetables,

Magnesium: 20 mg – Daily requirement – 420 mg/day for Males · 320 mg/day for Females. Magnesium is a mineral important for muscle contractions, a healthy nervous system, immune system and strong bones. It is involved in hundreds of enzyme reactions in the body. Good sources seeds, nuts, dark green vegetables, wheat grass. 

Phosphorus: 43 mg – Daily requirement 700 mg/day.  Phosphorous is a critical component of every cell. It works with the B vitamins to generate energy. Phosphorus is necessary for growth of bones and teeth; bones and teeth are 85% phosphorous. It works with sodium and potassium to maintain acid-base balance, and assist in muscle contraction, kidney function, heartbeat regulation, and in nerve conduction. Second to calcium in the body. Bones and teeth are 85% Phosphorus. Good sources all fruits, vegetables, nuts and seeds, and sprouts.

Potassium:427 mg No minimum RDA An adequate daily amount of potassium for adults is 4,700 mg/ day. Potassium maintains heartbeat and is important in many metabolic reactions. It balances fluid inside and outside the cells to maintain normal cell function. Potassium blunts the rise of blood pressure in response to excess dietary sodium. A high potassium diet might help prevent bone loss and kidney stones. Good sources – The highest sources are apricots, figs, prunes, bananas, oranges and orange juice, cantaloupe, honeydew, sweet potatoes and tomatoes

Sodium: 9 mg –  250 -500 mg a day is sufficient. Our  kidneys conserve and release sodium as needed. For “salt-sensitive” people, blood pressure will increases in direct proportion to increases in sodium intake. About 60% of adults with high blood pressure are salt sensitive. Blood pressure above120 systolic/80 diastolic is high. In countries where sodium intake is low, there is less hypertension, cardiovascular disease and stroke. Excess sodium may also weaken the bones by promoting calcium excretion.

Zinc: 0.31 mg The RDA for Zinc for healthy adults is:11 mg/day for healthy males 8 mg/day for healthy females. Zinc is a mineral that is needed for growth, especially during pregnancy and childhood, and for tissue building and repair. It is involved in wound healing, maintaining a healthy immune system, and cell reproduction. Zinc is a component of over 100 enzymes in the body. Good sources – sunflower seeds pumpkin seeds, Almonds pine nuts, pecans, walnuts, cashews, nuts, blackberries and kiwi.

Vitamin C: 22.9 mg  – The Recommended Dietary Allowance is 90 milligrams a day for males and 75 milligrams a day for females. Vitamin C is a powerful antioxidant  protecting cells against oxidizing damage, helps wounds to heal, fights infections, promotes healthy bones, teeth, gums and blood vessels, and aids in the absorption of iron. Good sources -Fruits and vegetables are high in Vitamin C. The highest are red and green peppers, oranges, cantaloupe, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cabbage, and tomatoes. 

Thiamin B Vitamin:0.067 mg – RDA 1.2 mg/day for males and 1.1 mg/day for females. Thiamin is a water soluble B vitamin, also known as vitamin B1. It helps produce energy from carbohydrate on a cellular level, and is very important for nerve conduction and muscle function. Alcoholics are very low on Thiamin – Not enough causes BERIBERI , both  wet and dry. Good sources – Brazil nuts, pecans, spinach, tomatoes, cantaloupe and oranges.

Riboflavin B2 Vitamin: 0.034 mg –  adults are 1.3 mg/day for males and 1.1 mg/day for females. Riboflavin is a water-solublevitamin, which helps us get energy from carbohydrates. It is important for growth and red blood cell production. It also helps to convert the amino acid, tryptophan, to the B vitamin, niacin. Good sources- Almonds,  broccoli, asparagus, and spinach.

Niacin B Vitamin: 1.069 mg The RDA for niacin (as NE) in healthy adults is 16 mg/day for males and 14 mg/day for females. Niacin is a water-soluble B vitamin, essential for energy metabolism in the cells, the proper functioning of the gastrointestinal and nervous systems, healthy skin, and the release of energy from carbohydrates, fats and protein. Affects the proper functioning of over 50 much-needed enzymes in the body. Niacin also has the ability to lower the LDL cholesterol (coined as bad cholesterol) level and prevent build-up of plaque on arterial walls. Good sources –  Niacin rich foods include almonds and seeds, wheat grass, green leafy vegetables, carrots, turnips and celery.

Pantothenic Acid – B Complex Vitamin:0.160 mg – 5mg a day is good. Pantothenic Acid is a water-soluble vitamin that is one of the B complex vitamins. It is involved in the release of energy from carbohydrates and helps to metabolize protein, fat and carbohydrates from food. Pantothenic acid plays a part in 100 different chemical reactions needed to produce lipids, steroids, hemoglobin, and other substances in the body. Good Sources – mushrooms, avocadoes, broccoli, and sweet potatoes.

Vitamin B6:0.144 mg – 1.3 – 1.7 mg per day. Vitamin B6, is a water-soluble vitamin needed by the nervous and immune systems. Vitamin B6 helps nerve cells to communicate. It is involved in making hormones, insulin, antibodies, and cell membranes, and is needed for the normal breakdown of protein, carbohydrates and fat. Vitamin B6 helps to maintain blood sugar within the normal range. Vitamin B6 also aids in the formation of niacin from the amino acid, tryptophan. Good sources – bananas, spinach, leafy greens, wheat grass, sprouts.

Folate:27 mcg –  The RDA for folic acid is 400 micrograms /day. Folate is one of several B vitamins found in foods. It is vital for making new, healthy body cells. Low Folate causes –  General weakness, fatigue, depression, gastrointestinal problems, and frequent infections. Good sources – strawberries and citrus fruits and juices; leafy green vegetables such as spinach and romaine lettuce, wheatgrass Folic acid, a man-made form of folate.

Vitamin A:1500 IU – International Units (IU) on food and supplement labels. Adult men require 3000 IU/day and women need 2310 IU/day. There is no RDA for provitamin A. Vitamin A is needed for: Vision, immunity, growth and reproduction. It keeps the mucous linings of he respiratory, urinary, and intestinal tracts healthy to prevent bacteria and viruses from entering.  Vitamin A is usually abundant in colorful fruits and vegetables is in a form that can be converted to Vitamin A (provitamin A). Carotenoids, like beta-carotene, are examples of provitamin A.  Good sources – Pro vitamin A is found in dark green and bright orange vegetables and fruits like spinach, sweet potatoes carrots, cantaloupe, apricots, tomatoes and others. Deeper colors are associated with higher levels of  Pro Vitamin A.

Vitamin E:0.97 mg – The RDA for vitamin E for adults is 15mg/day. Vitamin E is an antioxidant that protects cells membranes from damage. It is particularly important for cells that carry oxygen like the cells of lungs and red blood cells. Vitamin E also has a role in immune function, DNA repair, and other metabolic processes. Good Sources – seeds, nuts,  wheat grass, sprouts, dark green leafy vegetables (like spinach, etc.), and tomato.

Vitamin K:14.2 mcg  – Vitamin K aids blood clotting, protects the heart, and helps to build bones. Allow your blood to clot normally; Helps protect against osteoporosis; Prevent oxidative cell damage.
Good sources – the major source of Vitamin K is green, leafy, vegetables – kale, collards, spinach, and turnip greens are the highest.

Phytonutrients

Beta Carotene:808 mcg. Beta Carotene, as an anti-oxidant, supports the cardiovascular system. And, after the body transforms Beta Carotene to Vitamin A, it helps maintain the health of the skin, immune system, and eyes. Vitamin A is an essential component of the epithelial cells which guard us from environmental toxins. Beta carotene both lowers cholesterol and helps minimize arterial hardening. It may also benefit sufferers of cataracts, cancer, AIDS, high blood pressure, heart disease, Alzheimer’s disease, rheumatoid arthritis, headaches, and asthma. Beta carotene may also, because of its ability to act as a powerful antioxidant within the human body help prevent cancer and heart disease. In addition, because anti-oxidants neutralize the cell-structure damaging chemical reactions of free radical, beta carotene may slow free radical related aging and disease. A Harvard University study indicated that those who take 50mg of beta carotene daily have their risk of heart attacks and strokes cut in half! Beta carotene will also improve vision and skin conditions like psoriasis and eczema, and beta carotene acts to prevent the development of precancerous cells mouth and respiratory tract.

Lycopene: 4631 mcg. Lycopene is a natural pigment that gives the tomato its red colour.  It is also one of our most powerful antioxidants. Antioxidants have a protective effect on our cells and are often described as being ‘anti-aging’. Lycopene in particular has been noted for its ability to protect DNA and prevent disease, and it continues to be the subject of studies on heart disease and cancer. Lycopene is  released when the food is cooked or when the cell walls are broken down by a high speed blender. Good Sources – Tomatoes and other bright colored vegetables.

Lutein: 221 mcg. Lutein is concentrated in the retinas of your eyes and is necessary for good vision. A diet rich in lutein may lower your risk of developing cataract and macular degeneration. Lutein may also help prevent or slow down atherosclerosis, the thickening of arteries, which is a major risk for cardiovascular disease. Good Sources – Carrots, squash and other orange and yellow fruits and vegetables are sources of lutein. Green leafy vegetables, such as spinach, also contain high amounts of lutein.

I hope this information will help you to better understand how important it is that we have a good variety of fresh fruits, leafy greens, sprouts, nuts and seeds in our diet.

Blessings,

Robert Morgan – Bobby

Health & Education Director

Creative Health Institute

Union City,  Michigan 49094

866.426.1213

Author: Robert Morgan Certified Naturopath

Robert C Morgan - "Bobby" is the past Health Education Director at CHI. A certified Naturopath, Iridologist, Energy Practitioner, Colonic Therapist, Master Raw Live Food, Chef, Author, International lecturer, Teacher and Cancer "Surthrivor". Bobby is dedicated to continuing to carry out the work of Creative Health Institute, the vision of Dr. Ann Wigmore and all of the souls who have dedicated their lives to love peace, and natural health.

9 thoughts on “The Nutritional Power In 1 Cup Of Raw Tomatoes”

  1. Pingback: Find The Best Online Diet Program
  2. Whenever you follow the six abs load up diet strategy, you have to limit your calorie intake to 1600 calories per day. You need to consume MUFA or monosaturated fatty acid and also you need to consume every 4 hours simply because depending on the diet strategy, this is enough to get rid of stubborn fatty acids particularly in the midsection of the entire body.

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  3. Bobby, I was with Dr. Wigmore over 22 years, and I never saw her eat a tomato. She used it for decorations, but she was, like most women, allergic to the inflammatory properties of the tomato, as well as to the other nightshade vegetables: potatoes, eggplants, green and other colored peppers and also to citrus.

    Please send me an email at drflora3rd@netzero.net so we can discuss some of the recipe ingredients that have been added to the menu that are really not healthy, i.e. coconut oil, agave syrup, cocoa powder. There is no such thing as raw chocolate unless you eat the white ball of cocoa! The rest is just a dead starch that will react with the syrup and cause an acid alcohol buildup in one’s system, leading to cell destruction and gas, bloating, intoxication, etc. No one with cancer, heart disease or diabetes should ever use any type of oil. Please have whoever wrote some of those recipes read Dr. Caldwell Esselstyn’s book, “How to Prevent and Reverse Heart Disease” where there is a good explanation of why not to.

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  4. PS. Watermelon is a much better, safer source of lutein. Spinach is not a good food for anyone; because of the high oxalic acid content, it makes gall and kidney stones, and will lead a person into anemia because of it being a selfish veggie which not only robs us of the iron in it, but in other fruits, veggies and nuts/seeds we eat it with.

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