Lose Up To A Pound A Day – The CHI Way By Just Eating An Alkaline Balanced Diet?

 

Believe it or not there is a good side to having a high percentage of body fat, as it plays a major role in extending lives because it provides the first line of defense from the acid wastes that go hand-in-hand with the Standard American Diet (SAD).

When we eat the SAD, we consume vast amounts of acid-based foods.  These acidic foods cause acidic waste, so our body’s first line of defense is to use the body’s optimal amount of fat cells to store the toxins. This defensive measure is helpful, although for most of us it’s no match for the amount of acidic foods we are accustomed to eating – so the body must make more fat cells so that the acidic waste will not be dumped in to our blood stream. 

Our health problems are compounded when our fat cells multiply beyond our body’s ability to handle them at natural healthy levels.  When  this happens we find ourselves not only dealing with unhealthy levels of fat cells, we find our bodies soon show signs of disease in the heart, lungs, liver, colon, kidneys, pancreas, gall bladder and other vital organs.

When I speak about high acidic foods which are part of the SAD, I’m primarily referring to all processed food along with dairy, meat, bread and any foods which are high in sugar. All of these foods are highly acidic and cause acid wastes to build up through out the body, including the fat cells.  

This brings me to why you can healthfully loose up to a pound a day stopping the toxic poisoning of your fat cells and balancing your pH!  

Here at Creative Health Institute, our students and guests are always amazed at the amount of fat that just seems to melt off their bodies on a daily basis. This quick weight loss is not water weight, as every participant is eating two and a half to three pounds of high alkaline raw living food per day, along with drinking a minimum of half their body weight in ounces of water.  The key to their success is the power of the alkaline foods and their ability to help the fat cells safely release their toxic acidic waste into the bloodstream, without adversely affecting the blood or bodies vital organs and systems.

There are a million-and-one weight loss programs and diets. It’s proven that 99% of the craze diets fail, not because the dieter is lazy or has no self-control, but because the weight loss program or diet is not based in eliminating acidic toxic waste and poisons from the first line of the body’s defenses, i.e., fat cells.

So, are you ready to experience the joy that is a natural expression of being able to free your fat cells of toxic acidic waste and poisons?  If so, then simply begin eating two and a half to three pounds of raw highly alkaline food per day, drink a minimum of half your body weight in ounces of water and combine this simple eating regiment with just a ½ hour exercise daily. So, now that you know how it’s done, what’s keeping you from having the healthy toxin free body that you deserve?

If you need more information or need help with losing weight naturally, or want to know more about how you can have more natural energy, gain lean muscle, sleep better, wake more refreshed and be much less likely to get sick,  feel free to contact us at 866.426.1213. Creative Health Institutes programs are alkaline and oxygen based full body detoxification and rebuild counseling and direct learning programs, designed to help you be the healthy, happy person you deserve to be.

Blessings and peace,

Robert C Morgan  – Bobby

Health Education Program Director

Creative Health Institute, Union City, Michigan  49094

 Some Examples of Alkaline Forming Foods:

  • Alfalfa sprouts
  • Almonds
  • Apples
  • Apricots
  • Artichokes
  • Bananas
  • Beets & beet tops
  • Blackberries
  • Blueberries
  • Broccoli
  • Brussel Sprouts
  • Cabbage
  • Cantaloupe
  • Carrots
  • Cauliflower
  • Celery
  • Chard
  • Cherries
  • Coconut
  • Cranberries
  • Cucumbers
  • Currants
  • Dandelion greens – One of Dr. Ann Wigmore’s Favorites…
  • Dates
  • Dill
  • Dulse
  • Endive
  • Figs
  • Flaxseed
  • Garlic
  • Grapes
  • Grapefruit
  • Green beans
  • Guava
  • Huckleberries
  • Kelp
  • Kohlrabi
  • Lettuce
  • Limes
  • Logan berries
  • Loquats
  • Leeks
  • Lemons
  • Mango
  • Melons
  • Millet
  • Mint
  • Mulberries
  •  Mustard greens
  • Nectarines
  • Olives – raw
  • Olive oil
  • Onions
  • Oranges
  • Papaya
  • Parsley
  • Parsnips
  • Passion fruit
  • Peaches
  • Pears
  • Persimmons
  • Pineapple
  • Plums
  • Pumpkin
  • Radishes
  • Raisins
  • Raspberries
  • Rhubarb
  • Rutabagas
  • Sea Vegetables
  • Soybeans
  • Spinach
  • Squash
  • Strawberries
  • Swiss chard
  • Tangerine
  • Turnips
  • Water chestnuts
  • Watercress
  • Watermelon

 

Can You Be An Athlete And Eat A Raw Living Foods Diet?

What Do These World Class Athletes Have In Common? 

Bob Mionske, Esq. Portland, OR – U.S. Olympic Racing Cyclist, 1992;

Tim VanOrden – US Masters Champion Mountain Runner, 2010

Brendan Brazier – Canadian Champion:  50km Ultra Marathon, 2006;

Christine Vardaros – Champion World Class Cyclo-Cross Racer, 2007 Team USA

Kenneth G. Williams-Third at the U.S. Natural Mr. Olympia, 2004

James Southwood – International Kickboxing Champion, 2006

    They represent a new group of elite, super-vegan champion athletes, who are raising the competitive bar and setting new records  in the world of sports, according to recent press articles.  The secret weapon of these super athletes secret weapon is a nutrition coming from almost an exclusively or mainly made up of raw living foods.  All of them are dedicated to the live food diet and lifestyle, as it gives them the competitive edge,  enabling  them to achieve levels of health, strength, speed, stamina and agility that was not available to them before making this diet the center of their training regimen, according to their own comments.

     The ranks of professional champion and amateur  athletes are growing daily as they are reaping the benefits of utilizing raw live foods to enhance their performance.  They understand the raw living foods they’re eating are enzyme rich, loaded with oxygen and nutrient dense, according to what I’ve read about them.  With their old diets of mainly cooked food they were missing out on the enzymes and oxygen along with tremendous losses of vitamins and phyto-nutrients. 

     Enzymes are especially vulnerable to heat and many of them begin to lose their ability to function at 110 degrees Fahrenheit and are completely destroyed when the foods they are in reach 120 degrees Fahrenheit, according to my reading.  Once the exogenous enzymes are dead the entire digestion and nutrient assimilation process is left up to the indigenous enzymes to perform these functions, according to the legendary health practitioner Ann Wigmore, NMD.

    The problem is that our bodies only have a limited number of enzymes available and as we get older we are not able to make them at the levels that are required for optimum athletic performance, in-fact by the time a human reaches 50 years old they have less than 50% of the indigenous enzymes that they had at 25 years of age, according to my research.

   All humans, not just elite athletes need enzymes, which are the organic catalysts responsible for either starting chemical reactions or speeding them up, according to Dr. Ann.  Enzymes are also proteins, but unlike other proteins they have innate intelligentsia, according to many scientists.  Think of enzymes working much like a traffic cop, in that they direct and regulate the actions of the vitamins, minerals, phyto-nutrient and amino acids sending them along the body’s highways making sure they get off at the right exit.   You can also picture them as workers on a house construction site.   The vitamins, minerals and other nutrients are the building blocks.   As the workers on the house building site the enzymes take the building block to the house and place them where they should go. 

   Live, raw foods are the only 100% natural, healthy, source of nutrients that have what the body needs so it can function at the highest health levels possible, according to my experience.  The enzymes and high levels of oxygen, which athletes require to build and maintain muscles, are only found in raw living foods.  Best of all these foods do not have the toxins that are created by cooked foods and as much as 95% of the protein is available from all raw living foods, according to my experience.  Athletes who want to perform at the highest levels need high levels of protein and iron.   These necessary levels are found in sprouted seeds, grains and nuts which provide athletes with the highest levels of oxygen and bio-available amino acids, which insures high levels of protein and easy bio-availability and assimilation.

     Bobby’s ABC’s of Raw Living Food Athlete’s Diet

  1. 100% Live Foods:  Mix and match sprouted seeds nuts and grains.  These amazing foods are rich in amino acids, complex carbohydrate, zinc, B vitamins and enzymes.  To get the full benefit of these foods, blend them into energy soups or smoothies.  See the spouting chart at creativehealthinstitute/blog.com.
  2. Raw Fruits and Vegetables:  Choose from every color of the rainbow!  The high antioxidant ratings found in these amazing foods will ward off the toxins that are part of our internal and external environment, according to research arising from original work by Nobel Laureate Otto Warburg.  Don’t forget the leafy greens as they are loaded with more bio-available amino acids along with calcium, iron and every vitamin, mineral, &phyto-nutrient your body requires for strength, health and vitality, according to nutritionists.  Eat these foods in blended form and your body will not cry out for any kind of vitamin supplementation.   
  3. Probiotics:  Healthy bacteria are an essential part of your digestive system.  Fermented foods such as rejuvelac, seed cheese and sauerkraut provides super-powerful strains of pro-biotics, amino acids, vitamins, minerals, enzymes and antioxidants.

 

Wishing all of our friends and family the healthiest lives ever!

Robert  Morgan – Bobby

Director, Creative Health Institute

Sweet Poison

A century ago Americans consumed 40lbs of sugar a year

Last year we consumed 140lbs per person

 124 Ways Sugar Ruins Your Health

1. Sugar can suppress the immune system.

2. Sugar upsets the mineral relationships in the body.

3. Sugar can cause hyperactivity, anxiety, difficulty concentrating, and crankiness in children.

4. Sugar can produce a significant rise in triglycerides.

5. Sugar contributes to the reduction in defense against bacterial infection (infectious diseases).

6. Sugar causes a loss of tissue elasticity and function, the more sugar you eat the more elasticity and function you loose.

7. Sugar reduces high density lipoproteins.

8. Sugar leads to chromium deficiency.

9. Sugar leads to cancer of the breast, ovaries, prostate, and rectum.

10. Sugar can increase fasting levels of glucose.

11. Sugar causes copper deficiency.

12. Sugar interferes with absorption of calcium and magnesium.

13. Sugar can weaken eyesight.

14. Sugar raises the level of neurotransmitters: dopamine, serotonin, and norepinephrine.

15. Sugar can cause hypoglycemia.

16. Sugar can produce an acidic digestive tract.

17. Sugar can cause a rapid rise of adrenaline levels in children.

18. Sugar malabsorption is frequent in patients with functional bowel disease.

19. Sugar can cause premature aging.

20. Sugar can lead to alcoholism.

21. Sugar can cause tooth decay.

22. Sugar contributes to obesity.

23. High intake of sugar increases the risk of Crohn’s disease, and ulcerative colitis.

24. Sugar can cause changes frequently found in person with gastric or duodenal ulcers.

25. Sugar can cause arthritis.

26. Sugar can cause asthma.

27. Sugar greatly assists the uncontrolled growth of Candida Albicans (yeast infections).

28. Sugar can cause gallstones.

29. Sugar can cause heart disease.

30. Sugar can cause appendicitis.

31. Sugar can cause multiple sclerosis.

32. Sugar can cause hemorrhoids.

33. Sugar can cause varicose veins.

34. Sugar can elevate glucose and insulin responses in oral contraceptive users.

35. Sugar can lead to periodontal disease.

36. Sugar can contribute to osteoporosis.

37. Sugar contributes to saliva acidity.

38. Sugar can cause a decrease in insulin sensitivity.

39. Sugar can lower the amount of Vitamin E in the blood.

40. Sugar can decrease growth hormone.

41. Sugar can increase cholesterol.

42. Sugar can increase the systolic blood pressure.

43. Sugar can cause drowsiness and decreased activity in children.

44. High sugar intake increases advanced glycation end products (AGEs) (Sugar bound non-enzymatically to protein)

45. Sugar can interfere with the absorption of protein.

46. Sugar causes food allergies.

47. Sugar can contribute to diabetes.

48. Sugar can cause toxemia during pregnancy.

49. Sugar can contribute to eczema in children.

50. Sugar can cause cardiovascular disease.

51. Sugar can impair the structure of DNA

52. Sugar can change the structure of protein.

53. Sugar can make our skin age by changing the structure of collagen.

54. Sugar can cause cataracts.

55. Sugar can cause emphysema.

56. Sugar can cause arteriosclerosis.

57. Sugar can promote an elevation of low density lipoproteins (LDL).

58. High sugar intake can impair the physiological homeostasis of many systems in the body.

59. Sugar lowers the enzymes ability to function.

60. Sugar intake is higher in people with Parkinson’s disease.

61. Sugar can cause a permanent altering the way the proteins act in the body.

62. Sugar can enlarge the liver by making the liver cells divide.

63. Sugar can increase the amount of liver fat.

64. Sugar can enlarge the kidney and produce pathological changes in it.

65. Sugar can damage the pancreas.

66. Sugar can increase the body’s fluid retention.

67. Sugar is enemy #1 of the bowel movement.

68. Sugar can cause myopia (nearsightedness).

69. Sugar can compromise the lining of the capillaries.

70. Sugar can make the tendons more brittle.

71. Sugar can cause headaches, including migraine.

72. Sugar plays a role in pancreatic cancer in women.

73. Sugar can adversely affect school children’s grades and cause learning disorders.

74. Sugar can cause an increase in delta, alpha, and theta brain waves.

75. Sugar can cause depression.

76. Sugar increases the risk of gastric cancer.

77. Sugar and cause dyspepsia (indigestion).

78. Sugar can increase your risk of getting gout.

79. Sugar can increase the levels of glucose in an oral glucose tolerance test over the ingestion of complex carbohydrates.

80. Sugar can increase the insulin responses in humans consuming high-sugar diets compared to low sugar diets.

81 High refined sugar diet reduces learning capacity.

82. Sugar can cause less effective functioning of two blood proteins, albumin, and lipoproteins, which may reduce the body’s ability to handle fat and cholesterol.

83. Sugar can contribute to Alzheimer’s disease.

84. Sugar can cause platelet adhesiveness.

85. Sugar can cause hormonal imbalance; some hormones become under active and others become overactive.

86. Sugar can lead to the formation of kidney stones.

87. Sugar can lead to the hypothalamus to become highly sensitive to a large variety of stimuli.

88. Sugar can lead to dizziness.

89. Diets high in sugar can cause free radicals and oxidative stress.

90. High sucrose diets of subjects with peripheral vascular disease significantly increase platelet adhesion.

91. High sugar diet can lead to biliary tract cancer.

92. Sugar feeds cancer.

93. High sugar consumption of pregnant adolescents is associated with a twofold increased risk for delivering a small-for-gestational-age (SGA) infant.

94. High sugar consumption can lead to substantial decrease in gestation duration among adolescents.

95. Sugar slows food’s travel time through the gastrointestinal tract.

96. Sugar increases the concentration of bile acids in stools and bacterial enzymes in the colon. This can modify bile to produce cancer-causing compounds and colon cancer.

97. Sugar increases estradiol (the most potent form of naturally occurring estrogen) in men.

98. Sugar combines and destroys phosphatase, an enzyme, which makes the process of digestion more difficult.

99. Sugar can be a risk factor of gallbladder cancer.

100. Sugar is an addictive substance.

101. Sugar can be intoxicating, similar to alcohol.

102. Sugar can exacerbate PMS.

103. Sugar given to premature babies can affect the amount of carbon dioxide they produce.

104. Decrease in sugar intake can increase emotional stability.

105. The body changes sugar into 2 to 5 times more fat in the bloodstream than it does starch.

106. The rapid absorption of sugar promotes excessive food intake in obese subjects.

107. Sugar can worsen the symptoms of children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

108. Sugar adversely affects urinary electrolyte composition.

109. Sugar can slow down the ability of the adrenal glands to function.

110. Sugar has the potential of inducing abnormal metabolic processes in a normal healthy individual and to promote chronic degenerative diseases.

111..IVs (intravenous feedings) of sugar water can cut off oxygen to the brain.

112. High sucrose intake could be an important risk factor in lung cancer.

113. Sugar increases the risk of polio.

114. High sugar intake can cause epileptic seizures.

115. Sugar causes high blood pressure in obese people.

116. In Intensive Care Units: Limiting sugar saves lives.

117. Sugar may induce cell death.

118. Sugar may impair the physiological homeostasis of many systems in living organisms.

119. In juvenile rehabilitation camps, when children were put on a low sugar diet, there was a 44% drop in antisocial behavior.

120. Sugar can cause gastric cancer.

121. Sugar dehydrates newborns.

122. Sugar can cause gum disease.

123. Sugar increases the estradiol in young men.

124. Sugar can cause low birth-weight babies.

Best day ever,

Bobby Morgan

Creative Health Institute

 Creative Health Institute

Vegan Diet Out Scores American Diabetes Associations Recommended Diet

J Am Diet Assoc. 2008 Oct;108(10):1636-45.

Changes in nutrient intake and dietary quality among participants with type 2 diabetes following a low-fat vegan diet or a conventional diabetes diet for 22 weeks.

CONCLUSIONS: Vegan diets increase intakes of carbohydrate, fiber, and several micronutrients, in contrast with the American Diabetes Association recommended diet. The vegan group improved its AHEI score whereas the American Diabetes Association recommended diet group’s AHEI score remained unchanged.

Turner-McGrievy GM, Barnard ND, Cohen J, Jenkins DJ, Gloede L, Green AA.

Department of Nutrition, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA. brie@unc.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Although vegan diets improve diabetes management, little is known about the nutrient profiles or diet quality of individuals with type 2 diabetes who adopt a vegan diet.

OBJECTIVE: To assess the changes in nutrient intake and dietary quality among participants following a low-fat vegan diet or the 2003 American Diabetes Association dietary recommendations.

DESIGN: A 22-week randomized, controlled clinical trial examining changes in nutrient intake and diet quality.

SUBJECTS/SETTING: Participants with type 2 diabetes (n=99) in a free-living setting.

RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Participants were randomly assigned to a low-fat vegan diet or a 2003 American Diabetes Association recommended diet.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Nutrient intake and Alternate Healthy Eating Index (AHEI) scores were collected at baseline and 22 weeks.

STATISTICAL ANALYSES PERFORMED: Between-group t tests were calculated for changes between groups and paired comparison t tests were calculated for changes within-group. Pearson’s correlation assessed relationship of AHEI score to hemoglobin A1c and body weight changes.

RESULTS: Both groups reported significant decreases in energy, protein, fat, cholesterol, vitamin D, selenium, and sodium intakes. The vegan group also significantly reduced reported intakes of vitamin B-12 and calcium, and significantly increased carbohydrate, fiber, total vitamin A activity, beta carotene, vitamins K and C, folate, magnesium, and potassium. The American Diabetes Association recommended diet group also reported significant decreases in carbohydrate and iron, but reported no significant increases. The vegan group significantly improved its AHEI score (P<0.0001), while the American Diabetes Association recommended diet group did not (P=0.7218). The difference in AHEI score at 22 weeks between groups was significant (P<0.0001). With both groups combined, AHEI score was negatively correlated with both changes in hemoglobin A1c value (r=-0.24, P=0.016) and weight (r=-0.27, P=0.007).

CONCLUSIONS: Vegan diets increase intakes of carbohydrate, fiber, and several micronutrients, in contrast with the American Diabetes Association recommended diet. The vegan group improved its AHEI score whereas the American Diabetes Association recommended diet group’s AHEI score remained unchanged.

Sleep is a Necessity … Not a Luxury At Creativee Health Institute

Here at Creative Health all of our students are taught how to incorporate good sleep habits and how to identify which natural non habit forming sleep aids will assist them and others in their healing journeys.  We know,  for our bodies to overcome physical stresses we need to feed ourselves living foods combined with proper rest. These two elements are the basis for boosting the bodies immune system and putting the brakes on illnesses and disease that stress the body.

 The Center for Disease Control has adopted the slogan, “Sleep is a necessity … not a luxury” and has even implemented a viral e-card campaign on the Internet to spread the word.

Are you getting by with 5 to 6 hours of sleep or less per night? Have you convinced yourself you can function just fine on this small amount of of sleep?

The National Sleep Foundation has noted that the need for sleep changes as we age, but as a general guideline, adults need at least 7 to 9 hours of sleep during every 24 hour period. Sleep is when our body rebuilds muscle, calms nerves, balances hormones and does overall repair to the damages that  physical and mental stresses our body systems have endured during our waking hours. 

30% to 50%  of north Americans are getting insufficient sleep. Pour sleeping habits and insomnia weaken the immune system, brings on depression, aches and pains, weight gain,  lowered mental capabilities,  confusion, irritability, headaches and even death.

Best Life Ever!

Robert Morgan – Bobby

Creative Health Institute

Union City, Michigan

Is It Time To Leave Meat Behind?

“It is the position of the American Dietetic Association that appropriately planned vegetarian diets, including total vegetarian or vegan diets, are healthful, nutritionally adequate, and may provide health benefits in the prevention and treatment of certain diseases. Well-planned vegetarian diets are appropriate for individuals during all stages of the life cycle, including pregnancy, lactation, infancy, childhood, and adolescence, and for athletes”.

Click here and read the Associations comlete findings, as of July 2009.

Wishing every one the best health ever,

Robert Morgan

Creative Health Institute

Union City, Michigan 49094

866.426.1213

What Do The Lables On The Meat You Are Buying Really Mean…

Introduction

Ann Wigmore taught us not to rely upon meat as our source of substance and here at Creative Health Institute we adhere to her teachings and eat only a plant based diet consisting of mainly raw living foods. Though we are living this lifestyle many of our friends still eat animals. We hope this article with information taken from the USDA,  FDA  and the Mayo Clinic will help you to better understand the labeling processes being used by the factories and farms that provide meat for your table.

If the labels on the meat you are buying affect your buying decisions then you should know that food labeled with,”free range,” “natural” and “antibiotic-free” on meat, poultry and egg packages today, do not mean what you may have thought they meant.  In some cases, terms you find on packages are regulated under federal organic rules, while others are standard regardless of organic status. Other terms aren’t regulated at all.  Take a closer look.

Antibiotic-free

Under U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) regulations, meat and poultry products can be labeled as “no antibiotics added” if documentation is provided showing that the animals were raised without antibiotics. Similar allowable terms according to the USDA are “no antibiotics ever,” “no added antibiotics” and “raised without the use of antibiotics.” However, the term “antibiotic-free” isn’t USDA approved.

If animals are given antibiotics to prevent or treat disease, an antibiotic-withdrawal period — usually several days — is generally required before animals can be slaughtered so that there are no antibiotic residues in meat or poultry.

Cage-free

Under U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) regulations, this means that laying hens live uncaged, typically within a barn, warehouse, building or other enclosed area. They must have unlimited access to food and water and the freedom to roam within the enclosed area during their egg-production cycle. Cage-free doesn’t mean the hens have access to the outdoors. Cage-free birds can engage in some natural behaviors, such as nesting and spreading their wings. However, practices such as beak cutting are allowed. Poultry raised for their meat are rarely caged.

Certified humane

This is a voluntary certification and labeling program administered by Humane Farm Animal Care to ensure humane treatment of farm animals from birth through slaughter. This term is not regulated by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA). Certified producers must meet species standards for such things as space, shelter, handling, fresh water, and a diet free of added hormones and antibiotics. Cages, crates and tie stalls are prohibited. Animals must be able to engage in natural behaviors. For instance, chickens must be able to spread their wings and dust bathe, while pigs must have space to move around and root. Other organizations also offer certification and labeling programs.

Chemical-free

Under U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) regulations, this term isn’t allowed on meat or poultry labels, so if you see it, be cautious about its meaning. Similarly federal regulations don’t allow the terms “residue-free,” “residue tested,” “naturally raised,” “naturally grown” or “drug-free.”

At Creative Health Institute We Say When Life Gives You A Lemon Add It To Your Energy Soup…

“When life gives you a lemon add it to your energy soup or at least… squeeze it, mix it with six ounces of (pure) water and drink it.”

Don’t let the bad press about lemons removing tooth enamel scare you into not enjoying these amazing juicy citrus delights. Tooth enamel is made of minerals and its ability to withstand acidic substances varies from person to person.  Lemon juice or any other acidic substance can set up an environment that causes de-mineralization and decay of tooth enamel.

Lemon juice’s high acidity, pH 2-3, is due to the high citric acid content of lemon juice. When eating any food  or drinking beverages with this high acidity your tooth enamel will start to dissolve.

So, pay attention to the way you are consuming lemon juice. If you put it in a cup of water, it will raise the pH from high acidic to a slightly acidic range of 5-7 pH. Eating lemons without the water put your tooth enamel at risk of rapidly decaying. Some people drink lemon juice through a straw to keep the juice off of their teeth. The best and easiest way to protect your tooth enamel is to always rinse  out your mouth after eating a lemon, you should do the same with any fruit juice or sugary beverage. By the way, soda pop, pasteurized juices,  and energy drinks have a much greater impact on your tooth enamel does than lemon juice. The average 16oz soft drink is so acid that it takes drinking at least 32 of the same size glasses of alkaline water to restore the the pH blance

My recommendation is that you never drink anything but pure water, fresh raw living fruit juices, vegetable juices and smoothies, lemons always make a tasty addition to any of these. So, why not make a lemon juice diet a part of your healthy lifestyle and enjoy the amazing health benefits you will receive by doing so. Here at creative health institute most of us drink lemon water everyday and it is added to our many of our energy soups and jucices  The natural cleansing benefits are nothing short of amazing.

I love the health classic, Back to Eden, in which author points out that, “The lemon is a wonderful stimulant to the liver and is a dissolvent of uric acid and other poisons, liquefies the bile, and is very good in cases of malaria. Sufferers of chronic rheumatism and gout will benefit by taking lemon juice, also those who have a tendency to bleed, uterine hemorrhages, rickets and tuberculosis. In pregnancy, it will help to build bone in the child. We find that the lemon contains certain elements which will go to build up a healthy system and keep that system healthy and well. As a food, we find, owing to its potassium content, it will nourish the brain and nerve cells. Its calcium builds up the bony structure and makes healthy teeth.

“Its magnesium, in conjunction with calcium, has an important part to play in the formation of albumen in the blood. The lemon contains potassium 48.3, calcium 29.9, phosphorus 11.1, magnesium 4.4. Lemons are useful in treating asthma, biliousness, colds, coughs, sore throat, diphtheria, la grippe [flu or influenza], heartburn, liver complaint[s], scurvy, fevers and rheumatism.”

Make this moment the best moment ever!

Robert Morgan – Bobby

Creative Health Institute

Union City, Michigan

 

What Is The pH, & How Much Sugar, Caffeine & Calories Are In Your Favorite Drink?

Drink

Acid
(pH)

Sugar
(teaspoons in 12oz.)

Caffeine
(grams)

Calories (in 12 oz.)

Battery Acid 1.00 0 0 0
Stomach acid 2.00 (as low as 1.0 with projectile vomiting) 0 0 0
Lime Juice 2.00-2.35
Lemon juice 2.00-2.60
Cranberry Juice, canned 2.30-2.52
Vinegar 2.40-3.40
Sunny Delight 2.4 6.3 0 0
Gatorade Clear 2.4 5.5 0 0
Pepsi 2.49 9.8 (27 grams) 37 150
Country Time Lemonade 2.5 5.4 0 0
SoBe Sugarfree Tropical 2.5 0 0 0
RC Cola 2.50 43.2
Cherry Coke 2.52 8.9 34 0
Coke Classic 2.53 9.3 (27 grams) 34 140
SoBe Strawberry-Grape 2.6 6.5 0 0
Capri Sun 2.6 5.5 0 0
Orange Crush 2.7 10.5 0 0
Hi-C Blast Fruit Punch 2.7 5.5 0 0
Tang 2.7 5.1 0 0
HiC Lemonade 2.7 5.5 0 0
Extran 2.74 0 60
Powerade 2.75 15 grams 0 115
Orange Minute Maid 2.80 11.2 (48 grams) 0 180
Mellow Yellow 2.8 10.1 51 0
Diet Cherry Coke 2.8 0 34 0
Welch’s White Grape 2.8 7.8 0 0
Mr. Pibb 2.8 0 40 0
Hawaiin Fruit Punch 2.82 10.2 0
Squirt 2.85 9.5
Lipton Brisk 2.87 7 9 0
Upside Down 7-Up 2.9 6.3 0 0
Grapefruit Juice, canned 2.90-3.25
Cranberry Juice, white 2.9 5.5 0 0
Dr Pepper 2.92 9.5 (40.5 grams) 40 160
Gatorade 2.95 5.5 (21 grams) 0 75
Nestea Sweetened Lemon Iced Tea 2.97 7 16.6 0
Grapefruit juice 3.00 35 grams 0 150
Diet Rite (white grape) 3.00 0 0 0
Grapefruit juice 3.00 7.4 0 150
Kool-Aid Jammers (cherry) 3.00 5.1 0 0
Sierra Mist 3.00 5.5 0 0
Surge 3.02 10 51 170
Nestea 3.04 5 11 to 26
Pepsi One 3.05 0 36 1.5
Vinegar, cider 3.10
Diet Code Red Mountain Dew 3.1 0 0 0
Pepsi Blue 3.1 5.7 0 0
V8 Splash Berry Blend 3.1 5.5 0 0
Vinegar, cider 3.1 0 0 0
Orange Slice 3.12 11.9
Dole (orange strawberry banana) 3.2 6.3 0 0
Fresca 3.2 0 0 0
Propel 3.2 0.4 0 0
Snapple Tea 3.2 7.6 31.5 0
Snapple Tea Diet 3.2 0 0 0
Twist Up 3.2 5.5 0 0
Fresca 3.20 0
Mountain Dew 3.22 11 (46 grams) 55 165
Grape Minute Maid 3.29 11.9 0
Pineapple Juice, canned 3.30-3.60
Orange Juice, Flordia 3.30-4.15
Orange Juice, California 3.30-4.19
Diet Mountain Dew 3.34 0 55
Sherry-wine 3.37
Diet Coke 3.39 0 45
Dole (pineapple juice) 3.4 5.7 0 0
Apple Juice 3.4 4.8 0 0
Diet Dr Pepper 3.41 0
Sprite 3.42 9 0 140
Plum Nectar 3.45
Ultima 3.50 15
Juicy Juice 3.5 4.6 0 0
Tea (iced) 3.5 0 70.6 0
Tropicana Sprite Remix 3.5 5.5 0 0
Sherry-wine 3.37
Diet 7UP 3.67 0 0
Cytomax 3.79 75
Accelerade 3.86 4.4 0 120
Enervit G 3.88 8.9 0 81
Powerbar Endurance 3.89 0 0 105
Vegetable Juice 3.90-4.30
Prune Juice 3.95-3.97
Dad’s Root Beer 4 9.7 0
Pear Nectar 4.03 0 0
Milk, Acidophilus 4.09-4.25
Tomatoes, Juice 4.10-4.60
A&W Crème Soda 4.2 9.7 29
GU20 4.29 75
A&W Root Beer 4.3 0 0
Buttermilk 4.41-4.83
e load 4.50 216
Diet Barq’s 4.55 0
Barq’s 4.61 10.7 22
Emend 4.95
Milk, sour, fine curd 4.70-5.65
Emend 4.95 0 0
Milkfish 5.30
Guava Nectar 5.50
Brewed Coffee 5.51 203
Instant Coffee 5.51 143
Milk, evaporated 5.90-6.30
Alo Juice 6.00-6.80
Milk, condensed 6.33
Milk, Cow 6.40-6.80
Milk, Goat’s 6.48
Chrysanthemum Drink 6.50
Coconut Milk 6.10-7.00
Milk, 2% 6.8 3.5 0
Milk, skim 6.8 3.5 0
Water 7.00 0 0 0
Soybean Milk 7.00
Milk, peptonized 7.10
Wax Gourd Drink 7.20
Tea (brewed) 7.2 0 70.6
Tea 7.20
7UP 9.3 0 140
A&W Crème Soda 29
A&W Diet Crème Soda 22
Kick 57
Mellow Yellow 51
Ocean Spray 100% Cranberry Juice 35 grams 0 180
Pepsi One 55
Schweppes Ginger Ale 22 grams
Skim Milk 11 grams
Starbucks Latte 9.5 grams
Snapple 4.5 to 31.5
(see NSDA website)
Sunkist Diet Orange 42
Sunkist Orange Soda 35 grams 41
TAB 45
Tropicana Orange Juice 22 grams
Honest Tea Peach Oo-la-long 4.5 (18 grams) 60
Milk 18 grams 0 180
Orangina 7.75 (31.5 grams) 135
Fizzy Lizzy Grape 29 grams 0 120
Jones Soda Co. Green Apple 11.5 (46 grams) 180
Sweet Leaf Raspberry Sweet Tea 6.375 (25.5 grams) 105
Spark Mandarin-Carrot Juice Drink 10.5 (42 grams) 180
Minute Maid Apple Juice 10 (39 grams) 165
Original Arizona Iced Tea 9 (36 grams) 135
The Switch Black Cherry 9 (36 grams) 180

Because the pH scale is logarithmic, a one unit change in pH is associated with a 10 fold change in the acidity. For example, lemon juice has a pH of 2.0, while grapefruit juice has a pH of 3.0. Lemon juice would therefore be 10x as acidic as grapefruit juice. Even more enlightening, Coke Classic is roughly 100 times as acidic as Barq’s root beer.

NEWS: UK Study Finds Consumption Of Leafy Green Vegetables Lowers Type 2 Diabetes Risk

August 20, 2010

Green, Leafy Vegetables Linked to Lower Type 2 Diabetes Risk

FRIDAY, Aug. 20 (HealthDay News) — A new analysis of existing research suggests that eating more green, leafy vegetables can significantly reduce the risk of developing type 2 diabetes, but more study is needed.

An estimated 6.4 percent of people in the world have diabetes, and the rates of type 2 diabetes have been going up in the United States as the population has become more overweight, the authors of the analysis noted. Scientists have been trying to understand the role that diet plays in the development of the disease.

Researchers, led by nutritionist Patrice Carter at the University of Leicester in the United Kingdom, examined six studies that looked at the links between diet and the incidence of type 2 diabetes. They found that compared with those who ate the least amount of green, leafy vegetables (0.2 servings daily), people who ate the most (1.35 servings daily) had a 14 percent reduction in risk for type 2 diabetes.

However, the analysis didn’t show that increasing overall intake of fruit, vegetables, or a combination of both would make a significant difference in risk, Carter and colleagues reported in the Aug. 19 online edition of the BMJ.

Still, in the analysis authors concluded that “increasing daily intake of green, leafy vegetables could significantly reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes and should be investigated further.”

Diabetes researcher Jim Mann, who co-wrote a commentary accompanying the analysis, said in an interview that the findings don’t change the general message of the medical community that people should eat lots of fruits and vegetables.

The research is “a reminder of just how important dietary factors are in reducing the risk of type 2 diabetes. There’s far more evidence for this than for any drug treatments,” said Mann, a professor in the department of human nutrition at the University of Otago in New Zealand.

In regard to green, leafy vegetables, Mann wrote in his commentary that it may be reasonable to draw attention to their potential benefits and that they could be incorporated into one of the five recommended portions of fruits and vegetables a day. In an interview, he added: “Though they are certainly a potential component of a diet likely to reduce the risk — not only of diabetes but all chronic disease — the message needs to go beyond green, leafy vegetables.”

More information

The U.S. National Library of Medicine has details on diets for people with diabetes.

The Nutritional Power In 1 Cup Of Raw Tomatoes

The following information was covered in a lecture I gave on the nutrient density of raw living food when compared to cooked foods. I shared this information with Creative Health Institute (CHI) students in October 2009. I hope it helps you to appreciate the amazing health benefits we receive, when we eat the way we were intended to eat. Dr. Ann Wigmore’s teachings have inspired me to research the science or raw living foods. I am planning on adding an additional section to the blog that focuses on raw living food nutrition.

Peace, Blessings, Love & Gratitude,

Bobby

Nutrients In One Cup Of Tomatoes

Protein: 1.58 g – The recommended daily protein requirements for humans are derived from “ideal body weight”. The ideal body weight is calculated based on height and varies slightly for men and women.

Our protein requirements can also be expressed in terms of total caloric intake, The World Health Organization (WHO), and many national health agencies have independently conducted studies, which (even though they differ slightly) all conclude our daily protein requirement should be between 10% to 15% of our daily caloric intake. Proteins are necessary for building the structural components of the human body, such as muscles and organs. You also need proteins to keep your immune system healthy, synthesize neurotransmitters, create and signal hormones, and much more. A balanced raw living food diet supplies the body with all of the protein it needs. Living food protein is found in nuts, seeds, sprouts, vegetables and sweet and non-sweet fruits.

Calcium: 18 mg – daily requirement is 1000 -1200 mg. Calcium is a mineral that gives strength to bones and teeth. It is important for muscle contraction, blood clotting, and nerve function. Calcium is the most abundant mineral in the body.Good sources – sunflower seeds, dark-green leafy vegetables

Iron: 0.49 mg – Daily requirement 8 mg a day for men 16 mg a day for women. Iron is a mineral found in every living cell. It is part of red blood cells and muscle proteins. Iron helps the blood cells and muscles to carry and hold oxygen and then release it when needed. Iron is essential to make enzymes and hormones. Good sources – dark-green vegetables,

Magnesium: 20 mg – Daily requirement – 420 mg/day for Males · 320 mg/day for Females. Magnesium is a mineral important for muscle contractions, a healthy nervous system, immune system and strong bones. It is involved in hundreds of enzyme reactions in the body. Good sources seeds, nuts, dark green vegetables, wheat grass. 

Phosphorus: 43 mg – Daily requirement 700 mg/day.  Phosphorous is a critical component of every cell. It works with the B vitamins to generate energy. Phosphorus is necessary for growth of bones and teeth; bones and teeth are 85% phosphorous. It works with sodium and potassium to maintain acid-base balance, and assist in muscle contraction, kidney function, heartbeat regulation, and in nerve conduction. Second to calcium in the body. Bones and teeth are 85% Phosphorus. Good sources all fruits, vegetables, nuts and seeds, and sprouts.

Potassium:427 mg No minimum RDA An adequate daily amount of potassium for adults is 4,700 mg/ day. Potassium maintains heartbeat and is important in many metabolic reactions. It balances fluid inside and outside the cells to maintain normal cell function. Potassium blunts the rise of blood pressure in response to excess dietary sodium. A high potassium diet might help prevent bone loss and kidney stones. Good sources – The highest sources are apricots, figs, prunes, bananas, oranges and orange juice, cantaloupe, honeydew, sweet potatoes and tomatoes

Sodium: 9 mg –  250 -500 mg a day is sufficient. Our  kidneys conserve and release sodium as needed. For “salt-sensitive” people, blood pressure will increases in direct proportion to increases in sodium intake. About 60% of adults with high blood pressure are salt sensitive. Blood pressure above120 systolic/80 diastolic is high. In countries where sodium intake is low, there is less hypertension, cardiovascular disease and stroke. Excess sodium may also weaken the bones by promoting calcium excretion.

Zinc: 0.31 mg The RDA for Zinc for healthy adults is:11 mg/day for healthy males 8 mg/day for healthy females. Zinc is a mineral that is needed for growth, especially during pregnancy and childhood, and for tissue building and repair. It is involved in wound healing, maintaining a healthy immune system, and cell reproduction. Zinc is a component of over 100 enzymes in the body. Good sources – sunflower seeds pumpkin seeds, Almonds pine nuts, pecans, walnuts, cashews, nuts, blackberries and kiwi.

Vitamin C: 22.9 mg  – The Recommended Dietary Allowance is 90 milligrams a day for males and 75 milligrams a day for females. Vitamin C is a powerful antioxidant  protecting cells against oxidizing damage, helps wounds to heal, fights infections, promotes healthy bones, teeth, gums and blood vessels, and aids in the absorption of iron. Good sources -Fruits and vegetables are high in Vitamin C. The highest are red and green peppers, oranges, cantaloupe, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cabbage, and tomatoes. 

Thiamin B Vitamin:0.067 mg – RDA 1.2 mg/day for males and 1.1 mg/day for females. Thiamin is a water soluble B vitamin, also known as vitamin B1. It helps produce energy from carbohydrate on a cellular level, and is very important for nerve conduction and muscle function. Alcoholics are very low on Thiamin – Not enough causes BERIBERI , both  wet and dry. Good sources – Brazil nuts, pecans, spinach, tomatoes, cantaloupe and oranges.

Riboflavin B2 Vitamin: 0.034 mg –  adults are 1.3 mg/day for males and 1.1 mg/day for females. Riboflavin is a water-solublevitamin, which helps us get energy from carbohydrates. It is important for growth and red blood cell production. It also helps to convert the amino acid, tryptophan, to the B vitamin, niacin. Good sources- Almonds,  broccoli, asparagus, and spinach.

Niacin B Vitamin: 1.069 mg The RDA for niacin (as NE) in healthy adults is 16 mg/day for males and 14 mg/day for females. Niacin is a water-soluble B vitamin, essential for energy metabolism in the cells, the proper functioning of the gastrointestinal and nervous systems, healthy skin, and the release of energy from carbohydrates, fats and protein. Affects the proper functioning of over 50 much-needed enzymes in the body. Niacin also has the ability to lower the LDL cholesterol (coined as bad cholesterol) level and prevent build-up of plaque on arterial walls. Good sources –  Niacin rich foods include almonds and seeds, wheat grass, green leafy vegetables, carrots, turnips and celery.

Pantothenic Acid – B Complex Vitamin:0.160 mg – 5mg a day is good. Pantothenic Acid is a water-soluble vitamin that is one of the B complex vitamins. It is involved in the release of energy from carbohydrates and helps to metabolize protein, fat and carbohydrates from food. Pantothenic acid plays a part in 100 different chemical reactions needed to produce lipids, steroids, hemoglobin, and other substances in the body. Good Sources – mushrooms, avocadoes, broccoli, and sweet potatoes.

Vitamin B6:0.144 mg – 1.3 – 1.7 mg per day. Vitamin B6, is a water-soluble vitamin needed by the nervous and immune systems. Vitamin B6 helps nerve cells to communicate. It is involved in making hormones, insulin, antibodies, and cell membranes, and is needed for the normal breakdown of protein, carbohydrates and fat. Vitamin B6 helps to maintain blood sugar within the normal range. Vitamin B6 also aids in the formation of niacin from the amino acid, tryptophan. Good sources – bananas, spinach, leafy greens, wheat grass, sprouts.

Folate:27 mcg –  The RDA for folic acid is 400 micrograms /day. Folate is one of several B vitamins found in foods. It is vital for making new, healthy body cells. Low Folate causes –  General weakness, fatigue, depression, gastrointestinal problems, and frequent infections. Good sources – strawberries and citrus fruits and juices; leafy green vegetables such as spinach and romaine lettuce, wheatgrass Folic acid, a man-made form of folate.

Vitamin A:1500 IU – International Units (IU) on food and supplement labels. Adult men require 3000 IU/day and women need 2310 IU/day. There is no RDA for provitamin A. Vitamin A is needed for: Vision, immunity, growth and reproduction. It keeps the mucous linings of he respiratory, urinary, and intestinal tracts healthy to prevent bacteria and viruses from entering.  Vitamin A is usually abundant in colorful fruits and vegetables is in a form that can be converted to Vitamin A (provitamin A). Carotenoids, like beta-carotene, are examples of provitamin A.  Good sources – Pro vitamin A is found in dark green and bright orange vegetables and fruits like spinach, sweet potatoes carrots, cantaloupe, apricots, tomatoes and others. Deeper colors are associated with higher levels of  Pro Vitamin A.

Vitamin E:0.97 mg – The RDA for vitamin E for adults is 15mg/day. Vitamin E is an antioxidant that protects cells membranes from damage. It is particularly important for cells that carry oxygen like the cells of lungs and red blood cells. Vitamin E also has a role in immune function, DNA repair, and other metabolic processes. Good Sources – seeds, nuts,  wheat grass, sprouts, dark green leafy vegetables (like spinach, etc.), and tomato.

Vitamin K:14.2 mcg  – Vitamin K aids blood clotting, protects the heart, and helps to build bones. Allow your blood to clot normally; Helps protect against osteoporosis; Prevent oxidative cell damage.
Good sources – the major source of Vitamin K is green, leafy, vegetables – kale, collards, spinach, and turnip greens are the highest.

Phytonutrients

Beta Carotene:808 mcg. Beta Carotene, as an anti-oxidant, supports the cardiovascular system. And, after the body transforms Beta Carotene to Vitamin A, it helps maintain the health of the skin, immune system, and eyes. Vitamin A is an essential component of the epithelial cells which guard us from environmental toxins. Beta carotene both lowers cholesterol and helps minimize arterial hardening. It may also benefit sufferers of cataracts, cancer, AIDS, high blood pressure, heart disease, Alzheimer’s disease, rheumatoid arthritis, headaches, and asthma. Beta carotene may also, because of its ability to act as a powerful antioxidant within the human body help prevent cancer and heart disease. In addition, because anti-oxidants neutralize the cell-structure damaging chemical reactions of free radical, beta carotene may slow free radical related aging and disease. A Harvard University study indicated that those who take 50mg of beta carotene daily have their risk of heart attacks and strokes cut in half! Beta carotene will also improve vision and skin conditions like psoriasis and eczema, and beta carotene acts to prevent the development of precancerous cells mouth and respiratory tract.

Lycopene: 4631 mcg. Lycopene is a natural pigment that gives the tomato its red colour.  It is also one of our most powerful antioxidants. Antioxidants have a protective effect on our cells and are often described as being ‘anti-aging’. Lycopene in particular has been noted for its ability to protect DNA and prevent disease, and it continues to be the subject of studies on heart disease and cancer. Lycopene is  released when the food is cooked or when the cell walls are broken down by a high speed blender. Good Sources – Tomatoes and other bright colored vegetables.

Lutein: 221 mcg. Lutein is concentrated in the retinas of your eyes and is necessary for good vision. A diet rich in lutein may lower your risk of developing cataract and macular degeneration. Lutein may also help prevent or slow down atherosclerosis, the thickening of arteries, which is a major risk for cardiovascular disease. Good Sources – Carrots, squash and other orange and yellow fruits and vegetables are sources of lutein. Green leafy vegetables, such as spinach, also contain high amounts of lutein.

I hope this information will help you to better understand how important it is that we have a good variety of fresh fruits, leafy greens, sprouts, nuts and seeds in our diet.

Blessings,

Robert Morgan – Bobby

Health & Education Director

Creative Health Institute

Union City,  Michigan 49094

866.426.1213

A Simple Yeast Overgrowth Test You Can Do At Home

 
Yeast Over Growth Test

“Some health care professionals believe that Up to 89% of Americans May Have Candida” – If you would like to have a good indication if you have an over abundance of yeast… 

Try this Fast Candida Saliva Test Our Students & Guest Do It Every Day!` 

When you awake in the morning, before you brush your teeth, drink anything or eat any food, bring your tongue to the roof of your mouth and make a chewing motion until you have enough saliva in your mouth, then spit the saliva into a clear 8 oz  glass of water. Within 5-15 minutes, look in the glass. If there are strings coming down from your saliva, or if the water turned cloudy, or if your saliva sank to the bottom, You May have a Candida concern.  Healthy saliva will simply float on the top! 

Why does this work? 

Candida overgrowth begins in the colon. Overtime, as the fungal yeast multiplies it begins to migrate through the digestive tract, moving up into the small intestine, then the stomach (bloating, indigestion), up the esophagus and into the mouth. If it becomes strongly entrenched there and many times you can see a white film on your tongue and inside your cheeks. Once it has moved up to the mouth and you spit into a glass of water the yeast will sink because it is heavier than water. If there is no yeast, it will float on top. 

Remember this test is not 100% accurate and may miss yeast that has not traveled into the up the digestive track and entrenched itself on the tongue or in the mouth.  At Creative Health Institute we use the test as an indicator making sure our students understand that it is both a science and an art, when it comes to reading the results of the saliva test.

Physicians have other testing modalites which help with identifying Candida Overgrowth (CO).  One of the most reliable is the Candida Immune Complexes test, followed by a combinatoin of IgA, IgG and IgM test.  These tests range from $100 to $250, excluding the cost of your office visit.

Checklist for Candida Albicans  

This test is reviewing the signs and symptoms to determine if you have Candida Albicans yeast infection Overgrowth. 

Candida Albicans yeast infection Overgrowth, Candida Overgrowth (CO) symptoms are so numerous and seemingly unrelated that they can be confusing to both doctor and patient. The majority of people who have CO do not realize they have it until they become seriously ill. Why? Because candida yeast not only steals nutrients from the food that you eat, it then poisons the tissues with waste material containing over 75 known toxins. Candida albicans is linked, directly or indirectly, to the following list of conditions and symptoms. A “symptom” is an outward sign that points to a deeper problem. 

Review the 80 likely symptoms listed below to see if any apply to you. Give yourself ONE POINT for each of those which you have had persistently (for a month or longer, either currently or at anytime in the past).

Digestive Troubles

  • Bad Breath,
  • Gas/Bloating,
  • Indigestion,
  • Diarrhea,
  • Constipation,
  • Intestinal Pain,
  • Low Blood Sugar,
  • Food / sugar cravings,
  • Mouth or stomach ulcers,
  • Allergies (Air or Food),
  • Food Sensitivities,
  • Heartburn,
  • Dry Mouth,
  • Receding Gums,
  • Hemorrhoids, rectal itch
  • Irritable bowel.

Behavioral 

  • Anti-social Behavior,
  • Suicidal Tendencies,
  • Insomnia,
  • Depression,
  • Anxiety, high strung.
  • Irritability.

Skin & Joint Problems 

  • Thrush, Diaper Rash,
  • Acne, Skin Rash or Hives,
  • Dry Skin & Itching,
  • Finger, toe or foot Fungus,
  • Athlete’s Foot,
  • Liver Spots,
  • Water Retention,
  • Joint Pain,
  • Muscle Aches,
  • Numbness.

Troubles 

  • Hyperactivity
  • Attention Deficit Disorder,
  • Lack of Impulse Control,
Female Problems

  • Infertility,
  • Vaginal Yeast Infection,
  • Menstrual Problems,
  • PMS Symptoms,
  • Bladder Infections,
  • Endometriosis,
  • No Sex Drive,
  • Hormonal Imbalance,
  • Iron Deficiency.

Mental & Emotional 

  • Dizziness,
  • Mental Fogginess, (Confused, spaced-out, blank stares, day dreaming)
  • Inability to Concentrate (Having to re-read the same thing twice)
  • Poor memory (Where are my car keys? or, Why did I come into this room?)
  • Mood Swings,
  • Headaches.

Immune Problems 

  • Lethargic/Laziness,
  • Chronic Fatigue,
  • Asthma, Hay Fever,
  • Colds & Flu,
  • Puffy Eyes,
  • Respiratory Problems,
  • Chemical Sensitivity,
  • Epstein Barr Virus,
  • Adrenal/Thyroid Failure,
  • Cold/Shaky,
  • Ear Infections,
  • Chronic sore throat,
  • Post nasal drip,
  • Hair Loss,
  • Stuffed sinus (sinusitis),
  • Overweight,
  • Underweight,
  • Diabetes,
  • Burning Eyes,
  • Premature Aging,
  • Autism

YOUR ADDED SCORE IS _____ (one point per symptom) 

0-4 points – Indicates variations of normal living (unless persistent and severe).
5-9 Points– Indicates a Clear Pattern shows likely development of CO dysbiosis.
10 or more – Indicates Strong Pattern and almost certain CO dysbiosis. 

The term dysbiosis was originally introduced in the early 1900s by Dr Eli Metchnikoff to describe an imbalance of the bacteria in the gut. Literally it means ‘dys’ incorrect and ‘biosis’ life. The word comes from ‘symbiosis’ meaning to reside together harmoniously with the ‘dys’ meaning the opposite. He coined the expression that “Death begins in the gut!”. Metchnikoff was awarded the Nobel Prize in 1908 for his work on friendly bacterial flora [1]. He introduced the idea that fermented milk products could prove beneficial to the gut, inhibiting bacterial infection. He believed that the root of many diseases was via intestinal bacteria decomposing protein in the bowel. Lactic acid producing bacteria were believed to stunt the production of the pathogenic bacteria. 

Evidence has suggested that Dysbiosis plays a part in many conditions such as: Over production of yeast, Irritable Bowel Syndrome, Anklyosing Spondylitus, Rheumatoid Arthritis, Inflammatory Bowel Disease, Multiple Sclerosis, Chronic Fatigue, Eczema, food allergies. Many people are unaware that they are even suffering from Dysbiosis.  

Please call us if you need more information about our programs and how we deal with helping you to eliminate yeast overgrowth.

Blessings,

Robert Morgan – Bobby

Creative Health Institute

Union City, Michigan 49094

866.426.1213