Help For Those Who Suffer From Fibromyalgia

At Creative Health Institute we are blessed to eat only organic, raw and living foods. Dr. Ann Wigmore taught us nothing is more powerful than a living food diet, especially when it comes to addressing and overcoming our health challenges. 

Unfortunately many people do not understand the benefits of the lifestyle Dr. Ann Wigmore taught us, thus they unnecessarily suffer from many sicknesses and diseases, which they could easily avoid by just eating a living food diet.

We recently had a guest who was suffering from Fibromyalgia and not adhering to a living food diet, therefore she found it necessary to resort to these herbs and supplements which she felt help her overcome her health challenge. If you are not adhering to a living food diet, and suffering form Fibromyalgia you may also benefit from this regiment of herbs and supplements.

Love and blessings,

Bobby

Herbs that may help relieve the symptoms of  Fibromyalgia?

The following herbs may be helpful as an aid in relieving symptoms of this condition:

Evening Primrose oil eases rheumatoid pain.

Ginger harbors anti-inflammatory properties making it useful in the management of many disorders marked by swelling and pain.

Ginkgo biloba is an antioxidant that improves circulation and brain function.

Gotu Kola has anti-inflammatory effects and improves the flow of blood throughout the body by strengthening the veins and capillaries.

Olive Leaf boosts the immune system. Chronic fatigue and fibromyalgia sufferers are often helped by olive leaf extract. Olive leaf extract boosts energy, lift the sprit, Takes about 30 days to experience the full effect.

St. John’s Wort assists in raising serotonin levels which can improve pain tolerance.

Turmeric harbors potent antioxidant properties which makes the herb a fighter of free radical damage. Turmeric has also shown to harbor powerful anti-inflammatory properties that may help alleviate muscle pain and swelling.

Using Kava Kava or Valerian to aid sleep will assist the patient in combating fatigue associated with Fibromyalgia.

Vitamin C and grape seed extracts are powerful anti-oxidants and protect cells from damage.

Supplements that may help relieve the symptoms of Fibromyalgia?

Acetyl-l-Carnitine Addresses all symptoms and has a positive effect on the reduction of fibromyalgia associated pain.

Flax oil supplementation has also been found to provide relief for pain as well as the depression associated with fibromyalgia. It would make sense that ground flax may produce the same result maybe even better.

Magnesium helps to relax muscles. Prevents muscle spasms.

MSM (Methylsulfonylmethane) is a natural sulfur compound that is used to relieve pain.

SAMe helps in stress-relief, depression, eases pain, and it also produces antioxidant effects that may improve liver health.

The B vitamins are essential for increased energy and normal brain function.

5-HTP short for 5-hydroxytryptophan has calming effects and improves anxiety and symptoms of fibromyalgia.

You must not rely on the information on this website as an alternative to medical advice from your doctor or other professional healthcare provider.  If you have any specific questions about any medical matter you should consult your doctor or other professional healthcare provider. If you think you may be suffering from any medical condition you should seek immediate medical attention. You should never delay seeking medical advice, disregard medical advice, or discontinue medical treatment because of information on this website.

Robert “Bobby” Morgan

Creative Health Institute

Union City, Michigan 49094

Questions? 866.426.1213

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Creative Health Institue Reports – Cancer Prevention by Chlorophylls

The following study performed byMichael T. Simonich, Ph.D., gives us some insight as to why Dr. Ann Wigmore felt so sure that eating a plant based diet would have a positive effect in helping the body protects itself from many diseases including cancer. Our guests, at Creative Health Institute, are taught how to create recipes and design menus that really raise their intake of food containing substantial amounts of chlorophyll. On the daily menu is wheatgrass (wheat grass), energy soups and an abundance of sprouts and micro-greens. If you would like more information about our training programs and schedules, contact the office at 866.426.1213.
Blessings,
Robert Morgan – Bobby
Health Education Director
 
 

 Cancer Prevention by Chlorophylls

Michael T. Simonich, Ph.D.
LPI Research Associate

Numerous chemicals from fruits and vegetables protect against the damage wrought by carcinogens in experimental animal models. Usually these chemicals occur in edible plants at such low levels that doses sufficient for protection are not practically attained even in a balanced diet. Because of their abundance in green vegetables, chlorophyll and its widely used derivative, chlorophyllin, have attracted attention as potential anti-carcinogens. Scientists in our laboratory have studied the chemoprotective effects of chlorophyllin and have recently discovered that natural chlorophyll itself is a potent anticancer agent.

Chlorophyllin is easily and inexpensively made from crude chlorophyll and has been used for decades without known human toxicity as a food dye, a wound-healing accelerant, and for odor control. The anticancer properties of chlorophyllin have been extensively reported in dozens of studies from cell culture to rats, where different chemical carcinogens were used to initiate cancer. From these studies we have learned that chlorophyllin acts primarily as a blocking agent against chemical initiation of carcinogenesis. Simply put, chlorophyllin is most effective when administered along with the carcinogen, thereby blocking cancer-initiating activity. Molecular complexes formed between chlorophyllin and carcinogen molecules are physically too large to be absorbed from the gut. Because fewer carcinogen molecules reach the target organ, less DNA damage occurs, and the chance of tumor development is diminished. Consistent with the blocking mechanism, chlorophyllin is generally much less effective if administered after the carcinogen, i.e., once the carcinogen’s damage has been done.

Importantly, protection by chlorophyllin extends beyond a single chemical carcinogen to include aflatoxins from heavy fungal contamination of grain or nuts; heterocyclic amines, whose primary source of exposure is overcooked meat; and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), an increasingly abundant class of combustion-derived air pollutants. While aflatoxin B1 exposure is insignificant in developed countries with safe grain storage methods, it is prevalent in Asia and sub-Saharan Africa, where it contributes to astonishingly high rates of liver cancer. The latter two carcinogen classes represent significant exposures for the U.S. population, given high consumption of grilled meats and huge increases in airborne PAH-bound particulate matter, especially from diesel exhaust.

Significant protection against cancer by chlorophyllin was reported in the Fall/Winter 2002 LPI Research Newsletter (“Chlorophylls and Cancer Prevention: Passing the First Hurdle,” by Dr. George S. Bailey). That article summarized the results of a clinical trial of dietary chlorophyllin supplementation in a human population in eastern China with chronic, unavoidably high aflatoxin exposure and a high incidence of liver cancer. Administration of 100 mg of dietary chlorophyllin (in pill form) thrice daily led to a highly significant 55% reduction in the amount of aflatoxin-DNA adducts (substances connected by a chemical bond; in this case, indicative of DNA damage) in the urine of participants. Elevated urinary output of this hepatic DNA adduct biomarker in humans is clearly associated with increased risk of liver cancer, and diminished levels of aflatoxin-DNA adduct are associated with reduced liver cancer risk in several animal studies. Thus, simple dietary supplementation with chlorophyllin might cut human liver cancer risk in half for people chronically exposed to high levels of dietary aflatoxin. A long-term, 20-year clinical trial is now being conducted by Chinese investigators to evaluate the reduction of liver cancer incidence by chlorophyllin.

In impoverished regions, where diet choices are limited to survival staples and grain storage methods and pollution exposure will only improve with increases in the standard of living, dietary supplementation with chlorophyllin might be the easiest and most effective protection strategy to implement. In the developed world, a diet high in natural chlorophyll from vegetable consumption could offer substantial protection against food- and air-borne carcinogens, in addition to all the other known benefits of a vegetable-rich diet.

Dietary chlorophyll intake comparable to the 300 mg per day of chlorophyllin administered in the Chinese human intervention trial is obtainable by moderate-to-high consumption of green vegetables. Chlorophyll has no known human toxicity, but its protective properties have been little studied. This is likely due to the extraordinary cost of commercially pure chlorophyll (necessary for unambiguous experimental evaluation), or the difficulty and expense of purification in the laboratory.

Chlorophyll is potently anti-mutagenic and was recently shown to induce carcinogendetoxifying enzymes of phase 2 metabolism in cell cultures. A few studies have examined natural chlorophyll as a cancer preventative in animals. In rainbow trout, exposure to 200 parts per million (ppm) of dibenzo[a,l]pyrene (the most carcinogenic PAH known) resulted in hepatic DNA-adduct formation. Adduct formation was reduced 66% by co-exposure to 3000 ppm chlorophyll in the diet, which was nearly identical to the protection we observed by a similar dietary co-exposure to chlorophyllin. Another lab reported that dietary spinach or an equivalent dose of chlorophyll equally inhibited the proliferation of colon cells in rats induced by heme, an ironcontaining pro-oxidant from red meat that is correlated with increased risk of colon cancer. The chlorophyll-containing diets also largely blocked formation of a toxic heme metabolite. The authors speculated that green vegetables may decrease colon cancer risk from dietary heme through the protective effects of chlorophyll.

Our lab’s current research is focused on the rigorous testing of cancer prevention by natural chlorophyll in trout and rats. We recently examined protection by dietary chlorophyll in a rainbow trout multi-organ tumor model. Duplicate groups of 140 juvenile trout were exposed via the diet for four weeks to 224 ppm dibenzo[a,l]pyrene (DBP) alone, or with 1000, 2000, 4000, or 6000 ppm chlorophyll, then returned to the control diet. DBP induced high tumor incidence (number of fish with at least one tumor in each treatment group) in the liver (51%) and stomach (56%), and a low incidence in swim bladder (10%) nine months after initiation. Co-feeding 2000, 4000, or 6000 ppm chlorophyll significantly reduced stomach tumor incidence to 29, 23, and 19%, respectively, and liver tumor incidence to 21, 28, and 26%, respectively. A troubling result from the study was that dietary chlorophyllin given after carcinogen exposure (DBP diet, followed by 2000 ppm chlorophyllin for the duration of the study) had no effect on liver or stomach tumor response but promoted swimbladder tumor incidence to 38%. This finding supports previous evidence that chlorophyllin chemoprevention is not without some potential risk. Post-initiation promotion by chlorophyllin has previously been reported in the rat colon in specific experimental designs. However, in the one study where postinitiation effects of natural chlorophyll on colon carcinogenesis were examined, chlorophyll suppressed rather than promoted pre-cancerous lesions of the rat colon. The available evidence from previous studies and our recent finding in trout suggest that natural chlorophyll may be superior to chlorophyllin as a choice for chemoprevention in humans.

Our finding that chlorophyll substantially reduced tumor formation in trout compelled us to look for similar protection by chlorophyll in rats. We first studied protection against early biomarkers of carcinogenesis. Three groups of seven rats each received five daily doses of 250 ppb aflatoxin B1 alone, aflatoxin with 250 ppm chlorophyllin, or aflatoxin with natural chlorophyll equivalent to 250 ppm chlorophyllin. The aflatoxin was attached to a radioactive isotope, or radiolabeled, so that we could follow and measure it. Chlorophyllin and chlorophyll strongly reduced liver DNA adduction by 42% and 55%, respectively, and serum albumin adducts by 65% and 71%, respectively. The feces of chlorophyllin- and chlorophyll-treated rats contained 137% and 412% more radiolabel, respectively, than control (aflatoxin only) feces, indicating that chlorophyllin and chlorophyll inhibited aflatoxin uptake from the gut, restricting its distribution to the GI tract. This finding is consistent with chlorophyllin acting as a blocking agent, i.e., by binding the carcinogen and blocking its uptake to the bloodstream. A similar result for chlorophyll suggests that it, too, may protect by this mechanism. We examined whether chlorophyllin and chlorophyll protection might also occur at the metabolic level, after uptake from the gut. Chlorophyllin and chlorophyll were both recently shown by some of our collaborators to induce higher activity levels of the carcinogen-detoxifying enzymes of phase 2 metabolism in cell cultures. However, in the rat liver, neither co-treatment induced activity of the phase 2 enzymes quinone reductase and glutathione S-transferase (GST) above control levels.

A second study was done to examine the protection against late pathophysiological markers in the rat liver and colon. We specifically examined the effect of chlorophyllin and chlorophyll co-treatment on GST-placental form positive staining foci in the liver and aberrant crypt foci in the colon. Both foci types are small populations of cells that have undergone a hyperplastic transformation and, while not yet cancerous, will often become so. Twenty-nine rats in three experimental groups were treated with chlorophyll or chlorophyllin for ten days. At 18 weeks after carcinogen exposure, the chlorophyllin and chlorophyll co-treatments had reduced the percentage of GST-placental form positive foci in the liver by 74% and 77%, respectively, compared to control livers. Chlorophyllin and chlorophyll reduced the mean number of aberrant crypt foci per colon by 63% and 75%, respectively.

Our results show that both chlorophyllin and chlorophyll protect against early biochemical and late pathophysiological biomarkers of aflatoxin carcinogenesis in the rat liver and colon, and against PAH-initiated cancer in the rainbow trout. These studies provide the first demonstration in any animal model of cancer chemoprotection by dietary natural chlorophyll, which may be a less problematic choice for human intervention than its derivative chlorophyllin. While our results are entirely consistent with chlorophyll acting as a blocking agent like chlorophyllin, further experiments are needed to determine the precise inhibitory mechanism by chlorophyll of aflatoxin and dibenzo[a,l]pyrene uptake. The results also support the idea that increased consumption of vegetables with high chlorophyll content may substantially lower cancer rates among human populations at high risk from exposure to aflatoxin and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

Ladies: Don’t Lose Your Hair Over A Vitamin or Hormone Imbalance

 

Your hair is one of the first areas, along with skin and nails, to show signs of poor nutrition, hormonal imbalance, or illness. Excessive hair loss and the thinning of your hair can indicate something amiss.

Keep in mind  some hair loss is quite normal, so do not be alarmed by normal hair loss. Many women experience hair loss, to some degree, no matter what their age.  Healthy hair goes through two stages with 90% of the hair being in the growth stage and 10% of it being in the resting stage, which means 10% of your hair is in the process of falling out. 

Human beings lose hair every day, typically 50–100 strands a day. You can test hair loss with the “pull test.” Take about 50 hairs between your fingers and pull gently but firmly. Normally, 5-8 hairs will come out — reflecting the average 10% of hair follicles that are transitioning towards the resting phase at any one time. More than 15 hairs may indicate a more unusual period of hair loss.

If you have large amounts of hair falling out you should be concerned. This is a good time to take in to consideration your overall health and begin to first of all take a closer look at your nutrition regiment. Once you have determined you are providing your body with the proper nutrition, then it’s time to look into other factors which may be responsible for your hair loss. Some of the major contributors to women’s hair loss are hormonal imbalances, stress, yeast overgrowth and thyroid imbalances. 

The key to healthy hair is to make sure your diet is rich in raw living foods that provide the nutrients your body needs. If you are eating a balanced diet consisting of a wide array of foods that have all their live enzymes intact, you can pretty much be assured that you are getting the vitamins, minerals and phyto-nutrients your body needs to keep your body and hair in a healthy state. If  you have your diet under control and you are still experiencing above-normal hair loss it’s time to consider other factors which may be contributing to the loss and possibly using herbs and supplements to help stop the loss.  

 Herbal Remedies

 Horsetail

Also known as shave-grass, this herb looks like a horse’s tail, with its rough edges and spiky protuberances at the end of each sprig. Horsetail helps to repair tissues and improve circulation by stimulating blood flow. Hair follicles as well as nails are encouraged to grow. With its high silica content, Horsetail is an essential for forming collagen, maintaining tissue moisture, and assisting in maintaining a healthy immune system.  As with most herbs, horsetail can be taken as a tea, a tincture, or in capsules.

Nettles

Hippocrates considered nettles a cure for almost all ailments. Also called stinging nettle, or urtica dioica, this herb has been used for thousands of years for its myriad healing properties. Using nettles as a medicinal can yield potent results as the herb is rich in vitamins A, B complex, C, D, beta carotene, magnesium, phosphorus, iron, and protein. Nettles contain an abundance of silica for hair and nail strength and health. Nettles ability to promote circulation, assists in reducing hair loss and cleansing the skin.

Flax Oil

Consider taking a tablespoon of flax oil on a daily basis as it has been shown to help raise your immunity, soothe inflammation and strengthen hair follicles.

Maca, Dong Quai, Chaste Tree Berry, Wild Yam

The four most powerful herbs for balancing female hormones are maca, dong quai, chaste tree berry, and wild yam.

Vitamin and Mineral Supplements

Zinc

Zinc can boost thyroid function and reduce hair loss that comes from an under active thyroid. Zinc must be taken with its companion Copper (2 mg a day) in order to maintain proper mineral balance in the body. Copper also contains melanin, the pigment that colors hair and skin and can help reverse or delay premature graying. Zinc can also affect the levels of androgens, the hormones involved in some form of genetic hair loss.

Raw Multivitamin

Make sure it includes hair-healthy vitamins such as B, C, D and E. Other important nutrients are calcium, magnesium, and iron.

Massage

Scalp massage and can be helpful in stimulating blood flow to the scalp and supporting normal follicle function. You may also want to make sure that you get

Should your hair loss become unmanageable it is best to consult with a dermatologist as soon as possible.

Wishing all of our friends and family the best holiday season ever!

Love and blessings,

Bobby

Robert Morgan is a certified naturalpath and is the director of health and education at Creative Health Institute in Union City, Michigan.

Pyruvate – May Help Increase Mitochondria Energy

Description:

Pyruvate is a “salt” form of pyruvic acid – a 3-carbon molecule derived from the breakdown of glucose. The form of pyruvic acid found in dietary supplements is combined with various minerals such as sodium, calcium, magnesium or potassium to improve stability. In the body, glucose (6 carbons) is split into 2 pyruvic acid molecules (3 carbons each) in the end stages of cellular glycolysis.

When enough oxygen is present, pyruvic acid can be converted into acetyl CoA in the mitochondrion of the cell to produce energy. Oxygen coming to the cells is of the up most importance as it becomes pyruvic acid can raise the lactic acid, levels when there is a lack of oxygen. This situation can lead to muscle fatigue.

Claims:

  Elevated energy levels

  Increased endurance levels

  Increases muscle glycogen

  Reduces fatigue

Theory:
Because glucose (the chief sugar used by cells for energy) is broken down body into pyruvic acid, an increased level of pyruvic acid in the body is theorized to enhance a cell’s ability to generate energy.

Scientific Support:
In general, the scientific support for pyruvate as a way to boost energy levels is somewhat controversial. At least a couple of human studies, however, have shown that daily consumption of 25 grams of pyruvate plus 75 grams of DHA (another 3-carbon sugar derived from glucose) over one week can help improve endurance performance. 
 
Value:
Pyruvate products being sold at the health food stores contain only about 250-1500mg of pyruvate per serving – or about 100 times less than the levels shown to be effective in the clinical studies outlined above. Powdered forms are available that can increase serving sizes to 5 or 6 grams per serving.

Dosage:
Although 15 grams of pyruvate are typically recommended per day, this is more of a market . Most studies have used 20-30  grams or pyruvate or more. Most commercial preparations contain 500mg to 1 gram of pyruvate with 2-3 servings recommended per day.

Safety:
In some studies, subjects consuming relatively large doses of pyruvate have reported minor gastrointestinal disturbances such as diarrhea and flatulence.