The Nutritional Power In 1 Cup Of Raw Tomatoes

The following information was covered in a lecture I gave on the nutrient density of raw living food when compared to cooked foods. I shared this information with Creative Health Institute (CHI) students in October 2009. I hope it helps you to appreciate the amazing health benefits we receive, when we eat the way we were intended to eat. Dr. Ann Wigmore’s teachings have inspired me to research the science or raw living foods. I am planning on adding an additional section to the blog that focuses on raw living food nutrition.

Peace, Blessings, Love & Gratitude,

Bobby

Nutrients In One Cup Of Tomatoes

Protein: 1.58 g – The recommended daily protein requirements for humans are derived from “ideal body weight”. The ideal body weight is calculated based on height and varies slightly for men and women.

Our protein requirements can also be expressed in terms of total caloric intake, The World Health Organization (WHO), and many national health agencies have independently conducted studies, which (even though they differ slightly) all conclude our daily protein requirement should be between 10% to 15% of our daily caloric intake. Proteins are necessary for building the structural components of the human body, such as muscles and organs. You also need proteins to keep your immune system healthy, synthesize neurotransmitters, create and signal hormones, and much more. A balanced raw living food diet supplies the body with all of the protein it needs. Living food protein is found in nuts, seeds, sprouts, vegetables and sweet and non-sweet fruits.

Calcium: 18 mg – daily requirement is 1000 -1200 mg. Calcium is a mineral that gives strength to bones and teeth. It is important for muscle contraction, blood clotting, and nerve function. Calcium is the most abundant mineral in the body.Good sources – sunflower seeds, dark-green leafy vegetables

Iron: 0.49 mg – Daily requirement 8 mg a day for men 16 mg a day for women. Iron is a mineral found in every living cell. It is part of red blood cells and muscle proteins. Iron helps the blood cells and muscles to carry and hold oxygen and then release it when needed. Iron is essential to make enzymes and hormones. Good sources – dark-green vegetables,

Magnesium: 20 mg – Daily requirement – 420 mg/day for Males · 320 mg/day for Females. Magnesium is a mineral important for muscle contractions, a healthy nervous system, immune system and strong bones. It is involved in hundreds of enzyme reactions in the body. Good sources seeds, nuts, dark green vegetables, wheat grass. 

Phosphorus: 43 mg – Daily requirement 700 mg/day.  Phosphorous is a critical component of every cell. It works with the B vitamins to generate energy. Phosphorus is necessary for growth of bones and teeth; bones and teeth are 85% phosphorous. It works with sodium and potassium to maintain acid-base balance, and assist in muscle contraction, kidney function, heartbeat regulation, and in nerve conduction. Second to calcium in the body. Bones and teeth are 85% Phosphorus. Good sources all fruits, vegetables, nuts and seeds, and sprouts.

Potassium:427 mg No minimum RDA An adequate daily amount of potassium for adults is 4,700 mg/ day. Potassium maintains heartbeat and is important in many metabolic reactions. It balances fluid inside and outside the cells to maintain normal cell function. Potassium blunts the rise of blood pressure in response to excess dietary sodium. A high potassium diet might help prevent bone loss and kidney stones. Good sources – The highest sources are apricots, figs, prunes, bananas, oranges and orange juice, cantaloupe, honeydew, sweet potatoes and tomatoes

Sodium: 9 mg –  250 -500 mg a day is sufficient. Our  kidneys conserve and release sodium as needed. For “salt-sensitive” people, blood pressure will increases in direct proportion to increases in sodium intake. About 60% of adults with high blood pressure are salt sensitive. Blood pressure above120 systolic/80 diastolic is high. In countries where sodium intake is low, there is less hypertension, cardiovascular disease and stroke. Excess sodium may also weaken the bones by promoting calcium excretion.

Zinc: 0.31 mg The RDA for Zinc for healthy adults is:11 mg/day for healthy males 8 mg/day for healthy females. Zinc is a mineral that is needed for growth, especially during pregnancy and childhood, and for tissue building and repair. It is involved in wound healing, maintaining a healthy immune system, and cell reproduction. Zinc is a component of over 100 enzymes in the body. Good sources – sunflower seeds pumpkin seeds, Almonds pine nuts, pecans, walnuts, cashews, nuts, blackberries and kiwi.

Vitamin C: 22.9 mg  – The Recommended Dietary Allowance is 90 milligrams a day for males and 75 milligrams a day for females. Vitamin C is a powerful antioxidant  protecting cells against oxidizing damage, helps wounds to heal, fights infections, promotes healthy bones, teeth, gums and blood vessels, and aids in the absorption of iron. Good sources -Fruits and vegetables are high in Vitamin C. The highest are red and green peppers, oranges, cantaloupe, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cabbage, and tomatoes. 

Thiamin B Vitamin:0.067 mg – RDA 1.2 mg/day for males and 1.1 mg/day for females. Thiamin is a water soluble B vitamin, also known as vitamin B1. It helps produce energy from carbohydrate on a cellular level, and is very important for nerve conduction and muscle function. Alcoholics are very low on Thiamin – Not enough causes BERIBERI , both  wet and dry. Good sources – Brazil nuts, pecans, spinach, tomatoes, cantaloupe and oranges.

Riboflavin B2 Vitamin: 0.034 mg –  adults are 1.3 mg/day for males and 1.1 mg/day for females. Riboflavin is a water-solublevitamin, which helps us get energy from carbohydrates. It is important for growth and red blood cell production. It also helps to convert the amino acid, tryptophan, to the B vitamin, niacin. Good sources- Almonds,  broccoli, asparagus, and spinach.

Niacin B Vitamin: 1.069 mg The RDA for niacin (as NE) in healthy adults is 16 mg/day for males and 14 mg/day for females. Niacin is a water-soluble B vitamin, essential for energy metabolism in the cells, the proper functioning of the gastrointestinal and nervous systems, healthy skin, and the release of energy from carbohydrates, fats and protein. Affects the proper functioning of over 50 much-needed enzymes in the body. Niacin also has the ability to lower the LDL cholesterol (coined as bad cholesterol) level and prevent build-up of plaque on arterial walls. Good sources –  Niacin rich foods include almonds and seeds, wheat grass, green leafy vegetables, carrots, turnips and celery.

Pantothenic Acid – B Complex Vitamin:0.160 mg – 5mg a day is good. Pantothenic Acid is a water-soluble vitamin that is one of the B complex vitamins. It is involved in the release of energy from carbohydrates and helps to metabolize protein, fat and carbohydrates from food. Pantothenic acid plays a part in 100 different chemical reactions needed to produce lipids, steroids, hemoglobin, and other substances in the body. Good Sources – mushrooms, avocadoes, broccoli, and sweet potatoes.

Vitamin B6:0.144 mg – 1.3 – 1.7 mg per day. Vitamin B6, is a water-soluble vitamin needed by the nervous and immune systems. Vitamin B6 helps nerve cells to communicate. It is involved in making hormones, insulin, antibodies, and cell membranes, and is needed for the normal breakdown of protein, carbohydrates and fat. Vitamin B6 helps to maintain blood sugar within the normal range. Vitamin B6 also aids in the formation of niacin from the amino acid, tryptophan. Good sources – bananas, spinach, leafy greens, wheat grass, sprouts.

Folate:27 mcg –  The RDA for folic acid is 400 micrograms /day. Folate is one of several B vitamins found in foods. It is vital for making new, healthy body cells. Low Folate causes –  General weakness, fatigue, depression, gastrointestinal problems, and frequent infections. Good sources – strawberries and citrus fruits and juices; leafy green vegetables such as spinach and romaine lettuce, wheatgrass Folic acid, a man-made form of folate.

Vitamin A:1500 IU – International Units (IU) on food and supplement labels. Adult men require 3000 IU/day and women need 2310 IU/day. There is no RDA for provitamin A. Vitamin A is needed for: Vision, immunity, growth and reproduction. It keeps the mucous linings of he respiratory, urinary, and intestinal tracts healthy to prevent bacteria and viruses from entering.  Vitamin A is usually abundant in colorful fruits and vegetables is in a form that can be converted to Vitamin A (provitamin A). Carotenoids, like beta-carotene, are examples of provitamin A.  Good sources – Pro vitamin A is found in dark green and bright orange vegetables and fruits like spinach, sweet potatoes carrots, cantaloupe, apricots, tomatoes and others. Deeper colors are associated with higher levels of  Pro Vitamin A.

Vitamin E:0.97 mg – The RDA for vitamin E for adults is 15mg/day. Vitamin E is an antioxidant that protects cells membranes from damage. It is particularly important for cells that carry oxygen like the cells of lungs and red blood cells. Vitamin E also has a role in immune function, DNA repair, and other metabolic processes. Good Sources – seeds, nuts,  wheat grass, sprouts, dark green leafy vegetables (like spinach, etc.), and tomato.

Vitamin K:14.2 mcg  – Vitamin K aids blood clotting, protects the heart, and helps to build bones. Allow your blood to clot normally; Helps protect against osteoporosis; Prevent oxidative cell damage.
Good sources – the major source of Vitamin K is green, leafy, vegetables – kale, collards, spinach, and turnip greens are the highest.

Phytonutrients

Beta Carotene:808 mcg. Beta Carotene, as an anti-oxidant, supports the cardiovascular system. And, after the body transforms Beta Carotene to Vitamin A, it helps maintain the health of the skin, immune system, and eyes. Vitamin A is an essential component of the epithelial cells which guard us from environmental toxins. Beta carotene both lowers cholesterol and helps minimize arterial hardening. It may also benefit sufferers of cataracts, cancer, AIDS, high blood pressure, heart disease, Alzheimer’s disease, rheumatoid arthritis, headaches, and asthma. Beta carotene may also, because of its ability to act as a powerful antioxidant within the human body help prevent cancer and heart disease. In addition, because anti-oxidants neutralize the cell-structure damaging chemical reactions of free radical, beta carotene may slow free radical related aging and disease. A Harvard University study indicated that those who take 50mg of beta carotene daily have their risk of heart attacks and strokes cut in half! Beta carotene will also improve vision and skin conditions like psoriasis and eczema, and beta carotene acts to prevent the development of precancerous cells mouth and respiratory tract.

Lycopene: 4631 mcg. Lycopene is a natural pigment that gives the tomato its red colour.  It is also one of our most powerful antioxidants. Antioxidants have a protective effect on our cells and are often described as being ‘anti-aging’. Lycopene in particular has been noted for its ability to protect DNA and prevent disease, and it continues to be the subject of studies on heart disease and cancer. Lycopene is  released when the food is cooked or when the cell walls are broken down by a high speed blender. Good Sources – Tomatoes and other bright colored vegetables.

Lutein: 221 mcg. Lutein is concentrated in the retinas of your eyes and is necessary for good vision. A diet rich in lutein may lower your risk of developing cataract and macular degeneration. Lutein may also help prevent or slow down atherosclerosis, the thickening of arteries, which is a major risk for cardiovascular disease. Good Sources – Carrots, squash and other orange and yellow fruits and vegetables are sources of lutein. Green leafy vegetables, such as spinach, also contain high amounts of lutein.

I hope this information will help you to better understand how important it is that we have a good variety of fresh fruits, leafy greens, sprouts, nuts and seeds in our diet.

Blessings,

Robert Morgan – Bobby

Health & Education Director

Creative Health Institute

Union City,  Michigan 49094

866.426.1213

How Does Wheatgrass Work?

Many of you have asked for more information on the components of wheatgrass and how it works. This is a quick overview of what we discussed in our  wheatgrass familiarization class. I hope these charts will help you to better understand the wonder of wheatgrass and have a better knowledge of how and why it works to heal, balance and restore our bodies. 

Love and blessings,

Bobby

WHAT IS WHEATGRASS?

  • Wheatgrass is actually a vegetable not a grain. It is considered a cereal grass along with barley, alfalfa, etc.
  • The grass is cut and harvested when it is approximately seven inches tall.
  • One of the numerous good things about wheatgrass is that it does not contain the gluten that is in the grain.

Wheatgrass is a complete food made up of:

  • 12.0%    water
  • 70.0%    chlorophyll bonded carbohydrates
  • 12.0%    protein
  •  2.0%     fat
  •  1.8%     minerals
  •  2.2%     crude fiber

In addition, it contains an impressive array of trace minerals, vitamins, amino acids (all eight essential ones), and enzymes.

MAIN DIFFERENCE IN WHEATGRASS AND OUR BLOOD

Chlorophyll is the blood of plants. Its makeup is almost ODidentical to that of hemoglobin in human blood. The only difference is that chlorophyll has magnesium as its central atom. The central atom of hemoglobin ( BLOOD)  is iron. 

Nobel Prize winner, Dr. Hans Fischer while doing research on red blood cells, discovered that chlorophyll is remarkably similar to human blood on the molecular level. When wheatgrass juice is taken internally, its chlorophyll is rapidly assimilated into the bloodstream due to its resemblance to hemoglobin. It enters the red blood cells and works to heal tissues, purify the liver, balance blood sugar, and flush out toxins. Chlorophyll stimulates the production of red blood cells in hemoglobin, which carries oxygen to the cells. Chlorophyll often returns red blood cell counts to normal within four to five days. 

Chlorophyll / Oxygen / Blood

Otto Warburg, a German biochemist, won a Nobel Prize for his study that revealed that cancer cells cannot exist in the presence of oxygen. The enzymes, amino acids, and chlorophyll in wheatgrass juice contain antibacterial compounds that are especially good at destroying anaerobic bacteria that thrive in oxygen-poor blood and tissue.

Chlorophyll increases the function of the heart and affects the vascular system, the intestines, the uterus, and lungs. It helps in the stimulation and regeneration of the liver – the main organ of detoxification in the body.

   

The main difference between wheatgrass, and our blood:

 
     Blood  Central Atom  
   Plants  Chlorophyll  Magnesium  
   Humans  Hemoglobin  Iron  
 Major Components of Wheatgrass Utilized by the Human Body
 WATER  Involved with nearly all body processes
CARBOHYDRATES  Supply fuel
PROTEINS  Build and repair tissue
 FAT  Supplies energy
 MINERALS  Blood building and waste removal
 FIBER  Helps with good elimination
 CHLOROPHYLL  Protects / heals/ cleans/ builds blood / oxygenates (SUN ENERGY)
 ENZYMES  Workers who act as catalysts in many processes including digestion
 AMINO ACIDS  Building materials
 VITAMINS  Growth and development of cells
             

 

  Energizer  

How Does Wheatgrass Work

  • It is easily absorbed by the blood stream.
  • Less digestive work for the body means more energy and less sleep is required.
  • You will experience clarity of thought due to more oxygen reaching the brain.
 Appetite Depressant
  •  Wheatgrass is a complete food. As a result the appestat in the brain naturally shuts down the appetite.
 Digestive Aid
  •  Wheatgrass enzymes act as catalysts in the digestion of food and add valuable nutrients that are quickly absorbed into the blood stream.
 Fiber
  •  Wheatgrass provides fiber and chlorophyll, which helps to achieve and maintain colon health and regularity. We use the juice for rapid detoxification and rejuvenation.
 Minerals and Vitamins
  •  Wheatgrass has approximately 92 of the 102 known minerals found in the soil.
  • Wheatgrass, has thirteen essential vitamins and minerals, in addition to dozens of trace elements and enzymes.

To Your Health – A Shot of Wheatgrass

This article was written by Bobby and appeared in the Cold Water Michigan newspaper.

To Your Health – A Shot of Wheatgrass

Many of us within Branch County, financially benefit from modern farming techniques, most of our farms fertilize with NPK (Nitrogen, Phosphorous, Potassium) and it dramatically increase crop yields. Unfortunately, this fertilization process does not contain the necessary vitamins, phyto-nutrients and trace minerals, needed by the human body, for good health and prevention of disease. The cost of adding these nutrients to the soil is usually cost prohibitive and therefore the need nutrients are not incorporated into the farming process.

Supplying the human body with these lost nutrients is what wheatgrass does best. First studied for fortifying animal feed by agricultural chemist Charles Schanabel in the 1930s, wheatgrass was found to have more than 90 of the minerals and nutrients needed for the human body to operate at optimum levels.  In the early 60’s, Dr. Ann Wigmore, utilized wheatgrass in healing her own colon cancer and since then 1000’s of other people have learned about wheatgrass. Here at Creative Health we have been growing wheatgrass for 37 years and have had more than 15000 people attend  our institute, experiencing and learning the benefits of the wheatgrass and Dr. Ann Wigmore’s Raw Living Food Lifestyle. 

Wheatgrass contains over 90 minerals, including high concentrations of the most alkaline minerals: potassium, calcium, magnesium and sodium. Because it is a complete food it had all of the most necessary nutrients for life including the enzymes Protease (assists in protein digestion), Cytochrome Oxidase (a powerful anti oxidant), Amylase (facilitates digestion), Lipase (a fat splitting enzyme), Transhydrogenase (strengthens the heart muscle) & Superoxide Dismutase (SOD) (found in all body cells and is known for its ability to lessen the effect of radiation and slow cellular aging).

 Wheatgrass also contains 70% Oxygen rich Chlorophyll, which Otto Warburg, a German biochemist, won a Nobel Prize for his study, which proved cancer cells, cannot exist in the presence of oxygen. Dr. Ann Wigmore called wheatgrass “liquid oxygen.

 The enzymes, amino acids, and chlorophyll in wheatgrass juice also contain antibacterial compounds that are especially good at destroying anaerobic bacteria that thrive in oxygen-poor blood and tissue.

 If you feel like you would like to learn more about wheatgrass, I recommend “Wheat Grass Natures Finest Medicine” by Steve Meyerowitz and “Why Suffer – How I Overcame Illness & Pain” by Dr. Ann Wigmore. You can download a free copy of this book from several location on the internet.

A Simple Yeast Overgrowth Test You Can Do At Home

 
Yeast Over Growth Test

“Some health care professionals believe that Up to 89% of Americans May Have Candida” – If you would like to have a good indication if you have an over abundance of yeast… 

Try this Fast Candida Saliva Test Our Students & Guest Do It Every Day!` 

When you awake in the morning, before you brush your teeth, drink anything or eat any food, bring your tongue to the roof of your mouth and make a chewing motion until you have enough saliva in your mouth, then spit the saliva into a clear 8 oz  glass of water. Within 5-15 minutes, look in the glass. If there are strings coming down from your saliva, or if the water turned cloudy, or if your saliva sank to the bottom, You May have a Candida concern.  Healthy saliva will simply float on the top! 

Why does this work? 

Candida overgrowth begins in the colon. Overtime, as the fungal yeast multiplies it begins to migrate through the digestive tract, moving up into the small intestine, then the stomach (bloating, indigestion), up the esophagus and into the mouth. If it becomes strongly entrenched there and many times you can see a white film on your tongue and inside your cheeks. Once it has moved up to the mouth and you spit into a glass of water the yeast will sink because it is heavier than water. If there is no yeast, it will float on top. 

Remember this test is not 100% accurate and may miss yeast that has not traveled into the up the digestive track and entrenched itself on the tongue or in the mouth.  At Creative Health Institute we use the test as an indicator making sure our students understand that it is both a science and an art, when it comes to reading the results of the saliva test.

Physicians have other testing modalites which help with identifying Candida Overgrowth (CO).  One of the most reliable is the Candida Immune Complexes test, followed by a combinatoin of IgA, IgG and IgM test.  These tests range from $100 to $250, excluding the cost of your office visit.

Checklist for Candida Albicans  

This test is reviewing the signs and symptoms to determine if you have Candida Albicans yeast infection Overgrowth. 

Candida Albicans yeast infection Overgrowth, Candida Overgrowth (CO) symptoms are so numerous and seemingly unrelated that they can be confusing to both doctor and patient. The majority of people who have CO do not realize they have it until they become seriously ill. Why? Because candida yeast not only steals nutrients from the food that you eat, it then poisons the tissues with waste material containing over 75 known toxins. Candida albicans is linked, directly or indirectly, to the following list of conditions and symptoms. A “symptom” is an outward sign that points to a deeper problem. 

Review the 80 likely symptoms listed below to see if any apply to you. Give yourself ONE POINT for each of those which you have had persistently (for a month or longer, either currently or at anytime in the past).

Digestive Troubles

  • Bad Breath,
  • Gas/Bloating,
  • Indigestion,
  • Diarrhea,
  • Constipation,
  • Intestinal Pain,
  • Low Blood Sugar,
  • Food / sugar cravings,
  • Mouth or stomach ulcers,
  • Allergies (Air or Food),
  • Food Sensitivities,
  • Heartburn,
  • Dry Mouth,
  • Receding Gums,
  • Hemorrhoids, rectal itch
  • Irritable bowel.

Behavioral 

  • Anti-social Behavior,
  • Suicidal Tendencies,
  • Insomnia,
  • Depression,
  • Anxiety, high strung.
  • Irritability.

Skin & Joint Problems 

  • Thrush, Diaper Rash,
  • Acne, Skin Rash or Hives,
  • Dry Skin & Itching,
  • Finger, toe or foot Fungus,
  • Athlete’s Foot,
  • Liver Spots,
  • Water Retention,
  • Joint Pain,
  • Muscle Aches,
  • Numbness.

Troubles 

  • Hyperactivity
  • Attention Deficit Disorder,
  • Lack of Impulse Control,
Female Problems

  • Infertility,
  • Vaginal Yeast Infection,
  • Menstrual Problems,
  • PMS Symptoms,
  • Bladder Infections,
  • Endometriosis,
  • No Sex Drive,
  • Hormonal Imbalance,
  • Iron Deficiency.

Mental & Emotional 

  • Dizziness,
  • Mental Fogginess, (Confused, spaced-out, blank stares, day dreaming)
  • Inability to Concentrate (Having to re-read the same thing twice)
  • Poor memory (Where are my car keys? or, Why did I come into this room?)
  • Mood Swings,
  • Headaches.

Immune Problems 

  • Lethargic/Laziness,
  • Chronic Fatigue,
  • Asthma, Hay Fever,
  • Colds & Flu,
  • Puffy Eyes,
  • Respiratory Problems,
  • Chemical Sensitivity,
  • Epstein Barr Virus,
  • Adrenal/Thyroid Failure,
  • Cold/Shaky,
  • Ear Infections,
  • Chronic sore throat,
  • Post nasal drip,
  • Hair Loss,
  • Stuffed sinus (sinusitis),
  • Overweight,
  • Underweight,
  • Diabetes,
  • Burning Eyes,
  • Premature Aging,
  • Autism

YOUR ADDED SCORE IS _____ (one point per symptom) 

0-4 points – Indicates variations of normal living (unless persistent and severe).
5-9 Points– Indicates a Clear Pattern shows likely development of CO dysbiosis.
10 or more – Indicates Strong Pattern and almost certain CO dysbiosis. 

The term dysbiosis was originally introduced in the early 1900s by Dr Eli Metchnikoff to describe an imbalance of the bacteria in the gut. Literally it means ‘dys’ incorrect and ‘biosis’ life. The word comes from ‘symbiosis’ meaning to reside together harmoniously with the ‘dys’ meaning the opposite. He coined the expression that “Death begins in the gut!”. Metchnikoff was awarded the Nobel Prize in 1908 for his work on friendly bacterial flora [1]. He introduced the idea that fermented milk products could prove beneficial to the gut, inhibiting bacterial infection. He believed that the root of many diseases was via intestinal bacteria decomposing protein in the bowel. Lactic acid producing bacteria were believed to stunt the production of the pathogenic bacteria. 

Evidence has suggested that Dysbiosis plays a part in many conditions such as: Over production of yeast, Irritable Bowel Syndrome, Anklyosing Spondylitus, Rheumatoid Arthritis, Inflammatory Bowel Disease, Multiple Sclerosis, Chronic Fatigue, Eczema, food allergies. Many people are unaware that they are even suffering from Dysbiosis.  

Please call us if you need more information about our programs and how we deal with helping you to eliminate yeast overgrowth.

Blessings,

Robert Morgan – Bobby

Creative Health Institute

Union City, Michigan 49094

866.426.1213